Faculty News

Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies affiliated faculty members, visiting scholars, and staff are involved in a number of research projects and activities relating to the role of Canada, Québec and the Inuit in Arctic affairs. Please find news on some of these activities below.

 

March-May 2013
Vincent Gallucci, Chair, Presents Arctic Research at U.S. & Icelandic Conferences
In Spring Quarter 2013, Vincent Gallucci, Chair of Canadian Studies and Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, presented papers on Arctic geopolitics at three separate conferences. More ...

March 2013
Joël Plouffe Gives Talk at Western Washington University, "The Arctic Dimension to Canada’s Foreign Policy"
by Joël Plouffe, Visiting Québec Professor, University of Washington
Joël’s talk looked at how Canada’s foreign policy for the circumpolar world started to emerge in the 1950s as part of bilateral Canadian and American defense relations in the North American Arctic. More ...

March 2013
Economics of Ice: Globalization and the Polar Regions
by Kristy Leissle, PhD, Lecturer, University of Washington
I am very pleased to be offering the first humanities and social science based course on the polar regions, Economics of Ice: Globalization and the Polar Regions, at UW Bothell in spring quarter. More ...

January 2013
Québec Visiting Professor Teaches Course on Arctic Security
by Sophie Hubbell and Adam Akerblom, Arctic Initiative Interns, UW Undergraduates
Every so often the University has the honor of hosting one of the world’s bright minds in the form of a visiting scholar. More ...

January 2013
Joël Plouffe: Arctic Council, Circumpolar Governance, Environmental Cooperation
Joël Plouffe, l’Université du Québec à Montréal, U.W. Québec Visiting Professor for 2012-13 was interviewed by Exploring Geopolitics in January for all his achievements and efforts concerning the Arctic. Click here to view full article. 

January 2013
Article by Vince Gallucci, Nadine Fabbi, and Don Hellmann's Published in Fishing People of the North 
"Geopolitics, Arctic Council, and Arctic Resources,” by Vince Gallucci, Nadine Fabbi, and Don Hellmann, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, was just published in Fishing People of the North: Cultures, Economies, and Management Responding to Change (2012). More ... 

January 2013
Nadine Fabbi's Article Published in the 2012 Arctic Yearbook
“Inuit Political Engagement in the Arctic,” by Nadine Fabbi, was just published in the 2012 Arctic Yearbook, including 16 peer-reviewed papers providing a critical analysis on the Arctic region. More ...

January 2013
Visiting Scholars in Arctic Studies Offer Two Spring Quarter Classes!
Sari Graben, 2012-13 Canada-US Fulbright Chair, and Tony Penikett, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies 2012-13 Visiting Scholar, will be offering classes on Arctic Studies this upcoming Spring Quarter. More ...

October 2012
18th Inuit Studies Conference – Learning from the Top of the World
The Canadian Studies Center is building its Arctic initiative bolstered, in part, by participation in the Inuit Studies Conference held at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. in late October. More …

May 2011
Arctic Change! A New Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Class for University of Washington
by Rebecca A. Woodgate, Applied Physics Laboratory
Spring 2011 marked the start of a new Arctic class at the UW. Led by Oceanography professor Woodgate, this class aimed to introduce students of any discipline to the wonders and challenges of the Arctic. More...

 


March-May 2013
Vincent Gallucci, Chair, Presents Arctic Research at U.S. & Icelandic Conferences

In Spring Quarter 2013, Vincent Gallucci, Chair of Canadian Studies and Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, presented papers on Arctic geopolitics at three separate conferences.

In March, Vince traveled to Iceland where he presented the paper, “Fisheries resources under climate change and Arctic governance: A risk perspective” at a conference at the University of Iceland. The conference, The Trans-Arctic Agenda: Challenge of Development Security Cooperation, was a high-level seminar of the Institute for International Affairs and Centre for Arctic Policy Studies, University of Iceland and the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute held in cooperation with the Swedish and Icelandic Ministries for Foreign Affairs.

In April, Vince presented a paper, “How melting Arctic ice will change Russia, Canada and the rest of us,” at the 19th Annual Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Conference. The conference was held on the University of Washington campus.

This past May, he presented the paper with C. Michel, “Climate induced changes in Arctic marine ecosystem diversity with consequences for indigenous communities,” at the Wakefield Symposium: Responses of Arctic Marine Ecosystems to Climate Change held in Anchorage, Alaska.

Vince has served as the Chair of Canadian Studies since January 2013. Vince is a professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and director of the Center for Quantitative Sciences. He held the Lowell A. and Frankie L. Wakefield Professorship in Ocean and Fishery Sciences from 2001-2008.

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March 2013
Joël Plouffe Gives Talk at Western Washington University, "The Arctic Dimension to Canada’s Foreign Policy"
by Joël Plouffe, Visiting Québec Professor, University of Washington

WWU photo with Joël (left), Don Alper (center) and Chris Sands (right)

Joël’s talk looked at how Canada’s foreign policy for the circumpolar world started to emerge in the 1950s as part of bilateral Canadian and American defense relations in the North American Arctic. While both countries continued to engage bilaterally in that region throughout the 1960s till the 1980s, mainly (but not exclusively) because of the long-lasting legal dispute over the Northwest Passage, the Northern/circumpolar dimension to Canada’s foreign policy as we know it today was born in the early 1990s. Joël’s presentation also looked at how Canada was very active on circumpolar issues throughout the post-cold war period, being a major actor in the creation of the Arctic Council (Canada was the first country to Chair the Arctic Council in 1996 and will be starting its second mandate as Chair of the Arctic Council in May 2013). Today, Joël explained, because of climate change and emerging security issues, Canada is trying desperately to regain a role of influence in the circumpolar north but has yet to fine tune its approach to this changing region and also the changing role of the Arctic Council as the main forum for dialogue in the Arctic and with the rest of the world.

While visiting the Center for Canadian/American Studies at WWU, Joël had various meetings on Québec/US relations and studies with Dr. Don Alper, Director of Canadian American Studies at WWU, and Dr. Christopher Sands, 2013 Ross Distinguished Professor at WWU. In 2010, Joël was Québec Visiting Professor at WWU, teaching Québec Politics and Contemporary Issues. His two appointments in Washington State, at WWU in 2010 and, now, at UW for the Task Force on Arctic Security in 2013 were made possible through government funded grants from the Government of Québec, Ministère des relations internationals du Québec. He is grateful for their valuable support in funding research on Québec/US/Canada/North America related issues, and for allowing Québec scholars to visit and work with American colleagues around the United States.

Joël Plouffe from Université du Québec à Montréal is the 2013 Visiting Québec Professor at the JSIS, UW, co-teaching with Nadine Fabbi from the Canadian Studies Center a Task Force on Arctic Security. He is grateful to be working with Nadine at UW, and the outstanding JSIS IR major students part of the Arctic Task Force.

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March 2013
Economics of Ice: Globalization and the Polar Regions
by Kristy Leissle, PhD, Lecturer, University of Washington 

I am very pleased to be offering the first humanities and social science based course on the polar regions, Economics of Ice: Globalization and the Polar Regions, at UW Bothell in spring quarter. My scholarly interest in the polar regions arose after what I thought would be a purely recreational expedition trip to the Antarctic more than a year ago. Upon my return, I began to consider the geopolitical parallels between the Antarctic and my primary geographical area of study, sub-Saharan Africa. As I expanded my polar interests to include studies of the Arctic as well, I realized that, much like sub-Saharan Africa, the polar regions have been major and crucial locations of resource extraction, helping to fuel the global economy both historically and today, and at the same time under-discussed and under-represented in both popular media and social scientific academic studies. While the melting of the Arctic sea ice especially has opened new windows onto polar discussion, there still remains, I believe, a significant gap between the scale of political, economic, and historical contributions the polar regions have made to global flows of ideas, people, and goods, and the frequency with which they are discussed in popular discourse and studies of globalization within the academy.

My seminar will introduce the importance of the Arctic and Antarctic regions to global economic, political, and environmental processes, especially climate change, through both social scientific analyses and -- just as importantly -- analyses of representations in text and film, to explore the ways we think about and imagine the poles. My students will explore human interactions with the poles, regarding indigenous peoples, the age of European exploration, contemporary cultures (especially food), sovereignty, resource extraction, climate change, and contemporary tourism. We will look especially forward to an April visit from Antarctic veteran and author Jason Anthony, whose recent book Hoosh: Roast Penguin, Scurvy Day, and Other Stories of Antarctic Cuisine (2012), is required reading for the course, along with Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing (2007), and The Future History of the Arctic by Charles Emmerson (2010). Throughout the course, we will interrogate academic and popular media depictions of the poles, both textual (especially explorer accounts) and filmic. My goal is to emphasize the fragility and importance of the polar regions to global environmental health, resource flows, and historical knowledge of our planet. Students will give presentations on their research papers, which may cover any issue discussed in the course for either pole, on June 3 and June 5 on the Bothell campus. If you are interested in attending their presentations, please do contact me - we'd love to have you join us for what will undoubtedly be enlightening and lively presentations.

Kristy Leissle is Lecturer at the University of Washington Bothell and Seattle. Her research areas are, broadly, feminist international political economy, global trade, and sub-Saharan Africa, especially that continent's political-agricultural and colonial histories. Specifically, her work has been on the cocoa-chocolate trade between West Africa, Europe, and North America.

Download Course Syllabus

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January 2013
Québec Visiting Professor Teaches Course on Arctic Security
by Sophie Hubbell and Adam Akerblom, Arctic Initiative Interns, UW Undergraduates

Pictured here in the UW Quad are Adam Akerblom, Joёl Plouffe, and Sophie Hubbell.

Every so often the University has the honor of hosting one of the world’s bright minds in the form of a visiting scholar. In January the Canadian Studies Center had the pleasure of welcoming Joёl Plouffe to our beautiful campus. On the 15th of January we, the Arctic Initiative Interns, had the opportunity to spend the afternoon with Joёl showing him around our campus. Joёl is a professor visiting the University of Washington from Université du Québec à Montréal, and is here teaching the Task Force on Arctic Security. His primary focus is the international relations between actors involved in the Arctic as well as their security dimensions. These include international commerce, economics and military questions in the area. The research he conducts is an investigation of the geopolitical and regional dynamics of the numerous Arctic states and actors. Particularly the role played by Arctic interests in U.S. foreign policy is a major focal point.

When asked what the single most important thing he wanted people to understand about his research is, he divulged that the region is exceedingly dynamic in nature. Its diversity, peoples, cultures, histories, and biodiversity should be in the forefront of Arctic initiatives. The Arctic ice is disappearing however the people are not. Climate change can mean new opportunities that foster adaptation and substantial growth. This knowledge is taking effect in the Nordic region however Joёl seeks to create an awakening within North America and political science as a whole. The issues of the Arctic are not often felt by the southern-oriented people of North America and as such are largely absent from political debate and academic curriculums.

His foremost task during his visit to Seattle is to teach the 2013 Task Force on Arctic Security, a program of the Canadian Studies and International Studies programs in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. With climate change and globalization, the transformations taking place in Alaska, the Canadian Arctic territories and Inuit regions, and other Arctic nation-states, provide an opportunity to identify, assess, and challenge the meanings of 'Arctic Security' in the 21st century. The program is funded in part by the Ministère des relations internationales of the Gouvernement du Québec (MRI) (Website: http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/quebec/) In addition to this Joёl will also be giving a lecture entitled “Media in the Arctic, A Case Study of Canada and Quebec” on March 7th right here at the UW. 

Sophie Hubbell and Adam Akerblom are the Arctic Initiative Interns through the Canadian Studies Center. The Arctic Initiative includes expanding Arctic Studies at the UW. 

Funding for the Québec Visiting Professor Grant and the Québec Unit Grant are provided by the Government of Québec, United States University Grant Program.

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January 2013
Joël Plouffe: Arctic Council, Circumpolar Governance, Environmental Cooperation

Joël Plouffe, l’Université du Québec à Montréal, U.W. Québec Visiting Professor for 2012-13 was interviewed by Exploring Geopolitics in January for all his achievements and efforts concerning the Arctic. Click here to view full article.

Download pdf 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 2013
Article by Vince Gallucci, Nadine Fabbi, and Don Hellmann's Published in Fishing People of the North

The book, edited by C. Carothers, et al, includes 19 peer-reviewed papers that were presented at the symposium Fishing People of the North in September of 2011 in Anchorage Alaska. The goal of the symposium was to share knowledge of the opportunities and constraints that fishing people in northern countries encounter in a time of environmental, social and economic change. It was the first Wakefield Symposium to focus on the work of social scientists.

The paper by Gallucci, Fabbi and Hellmann focuses on the geopolitics of the Arctic Ocean. Geopolitics will determine the extent that the Arctic Ocean's alleged bounty of natural resources is utilized and in turn the fate of the peoples of the North and their environment. This paper reviews the role of the Arctic Council and some of its limitations. The role of the all-important United Nations Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) is described in the context of both non-arctic and Arctic Council nation states in the Arctic Ocean donut hole (the territory surrounding the geometric center of the Arctic Ocean) and exterior to the extended jurisdictions of the five arctic littoral states. Finally, opportunities the Arctic offers are considered for the nation state of China, as representative of North Pacific countries.

To order a copy of the book or article click here.

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January 2013
Nadine Fabbi's Article Published in the 2012 Arctic Yearbook

Nadine’s article focuses on the intersection between Arctic indigenous political mobilization and nation-state politics in the Arctic. The nation-state has typically been employed as the primary unit for political analysis in conventional international relations theory. However, since the end of the Cold War, transnational issues such as climate change along with a growing number of multinational corporations and international organizations are challenging the limits of that analytical model. This is especially true in the Arctic where indigenous organizations have reframed the region as a distinct territory that transcends national political boundaries. In Canada, the Inuit have remapped the Arctic along cultural lines in an effort to ensure all Inuit benefit from future policy implementation. At the international level, the Inuit are promoting a concept of the Arctic based on cultural cohesion and shared challenges, in part to gain an enhanced voice in international affairs. The Inuit are also utilizing customary law to ensure their rights as a people will be upheld. What is occurring in the Arctic is an unparalleled level of indigenous political engagement. The Inuit are “remapping” the Arctic region and shaping domestic and international policy with implications for the circumpolar world and beyond. This paper explores the unique nature of Inuit political engagement in the Arctic via spatial and policy analysis, specifically addressing how the Inuit are reframing political space to create more appropriate “maps” for policy implementation and for the successful application of international customary law. Joël Plouffe, Visiting Québec Scholar at the Canadian Studies Center, is a managing editor of the 2012 Arctic Yearbook.

About the Arctic Yearbook
The Arctic Yearbook is the outcome of the Northern Research Forum and the University of the Arctic Thematic Network (TN) on Geopolitics and Security. The TN also organizes the annual Calotte Academy.

The Arctic Yearbook is intended to be the preeminent repository of critical analysis on the Arctic region, with a mandate to inform observers about the state of Arctic geopolitics and security. It is an international and interdisciplinary peer-reviewed publication, published online at [www.arcticyearbook.com] to ensure wide distribution and accessibility to a variety of stakeholders and observers. To read the full version of The Arctic Yearbook , please click the front page image.

This publication is available under limited copyright protection. You may download, distribute, photocopy, cite or excerpt this document provided it is properly and fully credited and not used for commercial purposes.

Editor: Lassi Heininen, University of Lapland
Managing Editors: Heather Exner-Pirot, University of Saskatchewan and Joël Plouffe, University of Québec at Montréal (UQAM)

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January 2013
Visiting Scholars in Arctic Studies Offer Two Spring Quarter Classes!

The Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, and American Indian Studies, are offering the following courses in Arctic Studies in Spring Quarter 2013. The courses are open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Students who are interested in pursuing a minor in Arctic studies, may use these classes to count toward the minor (pending approval of the minor). Building on this foundation, Canadian Studies will work with the Quaternary Research Center the Program on Climate Change, and other new partners in the College of the Environment and the Polar Science Center to focus the chair on the Arctic.

JSIS 482A Canada Special Topics/AIS 475 Special Topics in American Indian Studies
Business in the Arctic - Working with Law and Policy in Resource Development

Dr. Sari Graben, U.W. 2012-13 Canada-U.S. Fulbright Chair

Dr. Sari Graben, U.W. 2012-13 Canada-U.S. Fulbright Chair
3 credits
Thursdays, 1:30-4:20p.m.
In the last several years, countries bordering the Arctic Ocean have made law and policy in the region a major priority. While there are several contributing factors to this prioritization, one of the most important ones is the opportunity for countries to develop their Arctic resources in concert with commercial partners. This opportunity has led to the proliferation of legal mechanisms that facilitate the exploration, development, and commercialization of natural resources on both land and in the seas as well as the protection of those resources as environmental goods. Providing an overview of the most recent legal and political developments in the Arctic, this course will emphasize challenges posed by environmental and global changes and developments in various areas of Arctic governance and will be organized around particular resource development activities. This will allow students to be exposed to the complex issues facing the Arctic from both an international and domestic perspective and to address legal/policy frameworks for dealing with them.

Tony Penikett, JSIS 2012-13 Visiting Scholar

JSIS 482B Canada Special Topics/AIS 475 Special Topics in American Indian Studies
Indigenous Land Claim Treaties in North America and the Arctic
Tony Penikett, JSIS 2012-13 Visiting Scholar
5 credits
Fridays, 9:30a.m.-12p.m.
The course will address the precedents or foundations of 20th century land claims agreements in North America including the Mexican conquest, the Cherokee cases at the Marshall Court, and the 400-plus Canadian and U.S. treaties that followed. Treaty negotiations and settlements in Alaska and northern Canada will be compared to those in Greenland and Norway.

Sari Graben, LL.B. LL.M. Ph.D., currently serves as an Arctic Policy Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Queen’s Institute for Energy and Environmental Policy, Queen’s University, Toronto. Graben’s primary research interests are in the field of administrative law, contract law, and comparative law with a special focus on issues raised by environmental contracting, privatization, and collaborative governance in the Arctic.

Tony Penikett, a Vancouver-based mediator, served in politics for 25 years including two years in Ottawa as Chief of Staff to federal New Democratic Party Leader Ed Broadbent MP; five terms in the Yukon Legislative Assembly; and two terms as Premier of Canada's Yukon Territory (1985-92). His government negotiated final agreement for First Nation land claims in the territory and passed pioneering education, health, language legislation, as well as leading a much-admired bottom-up economic planning process.

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October 2012
18th Inuit Studies Conference – Learning from the Top of the World

Conference advisory board: Vera Kingeekuk, Aqqaluk Lynge, Nancy Karetak-Lindell, and Louis-Jacques. Dorais.


The Canadian Studies Center is building its Arctic initiative bolstered, in part, by participation in the biennial Inuit Studies Conference held at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. 24-29 October 2012. This was the first year the Center participated in the Inuit Studies Conference serving to build new scholarly and organizational relationships with the Center.

Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director of the Center, chaired the panel entitled, “Inuit Governance, Land Claims and Sovereignty.” Nine panelists participated including from Greenland and Nunatsiavut, Canada’s eastern-most Inuit region. Johannas Lampe, Minister of Culture, Recreation and Tourism in Nunatsiavut, and Dave Lough, Deputy Minister of Culture, presented on the Inuit economy in the region including Inuit art.

Nadine also gave her paper, “Inuit Political Involvement in the Arctic,” that explores the relationship between Arctic foreign policy, territory, and customary law as found in the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The conference was hosted by the Arctic Studies Center, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. “The conference serves the critical function of drawing together scholars and Inuit representatives to share research results in the fields of archaeology, anthropology, linguistics, political governance, environmental sciences, health, education, and culture” (conference brochure).

The Inuit Studies Conference, founded at l’Université Laval, has been held biennially since 1978. This was the largest conference ever and the first to be held in the “lower 48.” There were about 550 attendees representing 16 countries and 40 states in the United States. An additional 1,000 individuals accessed the conference on-line.

Conference website: http://www.mnh.si.edu/arctic/ISC18/

The Inuit Studies Conference provided Nadine with a National Science Foundation travel grant to present her research at the conference.

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May 2011
Arctic Change! A New Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Class for UW

by Rebecca Woodgate, Applied Physics Laboratory
 

 

Rebecca Woodgate

Spring 2011 marked the start of a new Arctic class at the University of Washington. Led by Oceanography professor Rebecca Woodgate, this class aimed to introduce students of any discipline to the wonders and challenges of the Arctic.

As described on the course website: "The Arctic is no longer remote. Arctic sea-ice loss, shipping through the legendary Northwest Passage, the international land-grab for the North Pole and the Arctic sea floor, Arctic oil and gas exploration, the fate of the polar bear – these and more are all household terms. Yet, many people’s understanding of this system and the reality of the issues is based primarily on news and media coverage. The UW houses a remarkably wide range of world-class Arctic research – this course will access that knowledge base and provide an interdisciplinary, science-based introduction to Arctic science and topical world issues that are at the forefront of understanding how the Arctic works today, how the Arctic is changing, and what impacts those changes may have on us."

The course covered the ocean-ice-atmosphere system, extending into Arctic ecosystems (from ice-algae to the "charismatic megafauna"), and from this base, looked into topics ranging from the challenges faced by communities that live in the Arctic to the various roles the Arctic plays in the world. Guest lecturers from UW covered their own specializations, including Jody Deming (on Life In the ice), Sue Moore (on Life on and under the Ice, the Megafauna), George Hunt (on the Ecosystems of the Bering Sea, home of 50% of the US fish catch), Vince Galluci (on the Politics of the Arctic) and finally the Canadian Studies Center's own Nadine Fabbi, introducing Arctic Indigenous political mobilization particularly in Arctic Canada.

Woodgate and Deming also teach a graduate oceanography class - The Changing Arctic Ocean - but this new class was aimed much broader. Indeed, the 2011 class drew students in widely varying subjects, including oceanography, biology, engineering, astronomy, computer science, environmental science, aquatic and fisheries science, languages, psychology, sociology, architecture, ethnic studies, communications, law, political science, anthropology, art, international studies, health sciences, human design, and comparative religion - a true cross-section of the University, and a living example of the breadth of interest in the Arctic from communities at lower latitudes.
For more about "Arctic Change" see the course website at http://psc.apl.washington.edu/ArcticChange11.html

The Canadian Studies Center is the Council Representative for the University of Washington's membership in University of the Arctic. UW students are eligible to apply for a major in Circumpolar Studies via UArctic membership.

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Arctic & International Relations
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
Vincent Gallucci, Chair vgallucc@uw.edu
Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director nfabbi@uw.edu
Monick Keo, Webmaster monick@uw.edu