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Archived Events

The Canadian Studies Center, and other centers and programs in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, have provided public programs on the Arctic (including the role of Canada, Québec, the Inuit, and other Arctic nations) for over a decade. Please find below some of our most recent events. (For a full listing of events see the Canadian Studies Center's "Past Events" page.)

 

May 2013
Foodland Security Exhibition: Urban Inuit Access to “Country Foods”
by Emily Yu, Student Curator, UW Undergrad
Foodland Security, a photography exhibit by Inuk artist, Barry Pottle from Canada’s Nunatsiavut, was on display in the Allen Library through the month of May. More ...

May 2013
New Graduate Seminar! The Arctic as an Emerging Global Region
Thanks to an Andrew Mellon Grant designed to restructure area and international studies in a fast-changing world, Canadian Studies, in conjunction with other area studies programs and units in College of the Environment, are offering a fall graduate seminar on the Arctic as emerging global region including $5,000 Graduate Research Fellowships. More ...
 

May 2013
Fulbright Roundtable on the Arctic: Regulatory Processes & the Role of Canada’s Inuit in Shaping the Arctic Council
by Melissa Croce, Intern, Jackson School of International Studies
The Canadian Studies Center, in collaboration with the Consulate General of Canada, Seattle, the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, Toronto, the sponsors of the Canada-U.S. Fulbright Chair, and the UW Future of Ice initiative, hosted the annual Fulbright lecture and roundtable on current insights into decision-making in the Arctic. More ...

March 2013
New Canada Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at U.W.
The new Canada Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies is part of the Center’s Arctic Initiative as well as part of The Future of Ice: A Polar Regions Science and Policy Initiative being developed by the College of Arts and Sciences, College of the Environment, and Applied Physics Laboratory. More ...

November 2012
Canada, the United States & the Arctic Council – Preparing for the Age of the Arctic On Tuesday, November 13, key Arctic consultant Terry Fenge visited the UW campus and led a provocative roundtable discussion on the Arctic Council. More ...

November 2012
Oil in the Arctic - Decision Making Under Conflict and Uncertainty: Exploring the Environmental and Human Dimensions of Risk from Oil in a Changing Arctic
by Robert Pavia, Ph.D., School of Marine and Environmental Affairs
The School of Marine and Environmental Affairs is examining risks from maritime transportation and oil development in the Arctic in the face of change in the physical environment, ecosystems, and the human communities that depend upon them in a graduate course being offered autumn quarter. More ...

March 2011
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) Arctic Foreign Policy Symposium
In mid-March the International Centre for Northern Governance and Development, University of Saskatchewan, hosted a DFAIT symposium to showcase the research of past Circumpolar Fellowship recipients including Nadine Fabbi. More...

March 2011
Arctic Sovereignty at Edmonds Community College
In the March course on Arctic Sovereignty, my understanding and knowledge of the Inuit in Arctic Canada was broadened. More ...

September 2010
Canadian Studies & University of the Arctic
The Canadian Studies Center is the second institution in the forty-eight contiguous states (after Dartmouth) to have the opportunity to be a member of University of the Arctic—a network of over one hundred institutions dedicated to research and education that benefits northerners. More ...

Winter 2009
Arctic Sovereignty Lecture Series
by Greg Shelton, Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies
The Arctic Sovereignty lecture series provided new thinking on the circumpolar region from the perspective of science, politics, history and international foreign policy. More ...


May 2013
Foodland Security Exhibition: Urban Inuit Access to “Country Foods”
by Emily Yu, Student Curator, UW Undergrad
Foodland Security, a photography exhibit by Inuk artist, Barry Pottle from Canada’s Nunatsiavut, was on display in the Allen Library through the month of May.

Emily Yu, student curator, poses beside one of Pottle’s Foodland Security photographs.

In May, the U.W. was honored to host the exhibition, Foodland Security, by Inuit photograher, Barry Pottle. Foodland Security is about the challenge of Inuit in urban settings to gain access to “country food” or food from the land. Pottle’s work focuses primarily on the Inuit community in Ottawa including cultural activities and images that reflect Inuit identity. His goal is to explore the robust Inuit community in Ottawa and to highlight its richness and vibrancy.

The exhibit included 15 images or photographs including images of food from the community freezer, the preparation of food, cutting caribou, preparing Arctic char. “Still Life” features a piece of char and muktaaq or whale meat. “After the Cut” includes two Inuit cutting knives – the ulu – and a scarp of caribou meat on cardboard. “Muktaaq” illustrates the natural design of the meat. “I wanted to capture elements of the food we eat as Inuit in southern Canada,” says Pottle, “and the way we have adapted to our environment and life.”

I have been extremely privileged to be an intern for the Foodland Security exhibition. I have been in the fortunate position of being able to meet and communicate with the people integral to the success of the exhibit. Every one of them led me to think of the exhibition from a different perspective – Barry Pottle provided the core of the exhibit, Nadine Fabbi gave me direction and focus, the U.W. Allen Library staff helped me think of the logistics and setup of the exhibition. Even the people who stopped to talk to me about the exhibit as they were passing by the Allen Lobby provided me with a new understanding of the whole process. This has not only given me many important experiences outside of a classroom setting, but has also nurtured my ability to look at things from a different, bigger perspective, something I have no doubt will be valuable in the future.

Viewing a photo exhibition from the inside has allowed me to appreciate the amount of thought and effort that goes into every step of the process. Every single detail, from choosing a font and layout for the image descriptions to confirming the dimensions of a shipped package, needs to be considered and planned out in advance. Not only must these factors be well thought out, but there also needs to be efficient and clear communication about them to every person involved in the process.

Barry Pottle is an Ottawa-based photographer originally from the Inuit region of Nunatsiavut, Labrador (Rigolet). He has a BA in Aboriginal Studies from Carleton University. Pottle uses photography to give focus to issues currently facing Inuit.

Emily Yu , student curator for Foodland Security, is an undergraduate student at the University of Washington. She is interested in pursuing a career in the fields of Art and Psychology.

The Foodland Security exhibition was made possible by funding from the Canadian Studies Center’s Title VI grant allocation from the Office of Postsecondary Education, International Education Program Services, U.S. Department of Education; a Fund for the Arts Grant from the Association of Canadian Studies in the United States; the Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium; the UW Native Organization of Indigenous Scholars; the UW Libraries; the Ontario Arts Council; and, the Future of Ice Initiative.

Exhibit poster
Exhibit brochure page 1 & page 2

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May 2013
New Graduate Seminar! The Arctic as an Emerging Global Region

Starting the Feast (from Foodland Security Exhibit)
An Inuk woman cutting up Muktaaq (whale blubber) at the start of an Inuit traditional feast. “I wanted to give some perspective on how the Inuit use traditional practices in an urban setting,” Barry Pottle, Ottawa-based photographer originally from Nunatsiavut, Labrador.

Thanks to an Andrew Mellon Grant designed to restructure area and international studies in a fast-changing world, Canadian Studies, in conjunction with other area studies programs and units in College of the Environment, are offering a fall graduate seminar on the Arctic as emerging global region including $5,000 Graduate Research Fellowships.

In 2013 the U.W. received a $750,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for its area studies programs, enabling the eight Title VI National Resource Centers (NRC) in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies to continue their programs for students, educators, and the community. The NRCs, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, focus on specific areas, regions or countries, providing language instruction, coursework, and public engagement to build awareness and knowledge of different regions of the world.

The Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS), in collaboration with the JSIS Title VI area/international studies centers and a number of units in both the Colleges of Arts and Science and the Environment, wrote a successful $40,000 Andrew W. Mellon Grant Project (2013-14) entitled, Re-Imagining Area Studies in the 21st Century: The Arctic as an Emerging Global Region. The goal of the project is to formulate new ideas concerning how area and global studies can be organized at the U.W. in decades to come. This project will re-imagine the present configuration of area/international studies to include a new emerging world region - the Arctic. In addition, this project will attempt to broaden traditional area/international studies scholarship that encompassed the social sciences and humanities, to include the natural sciences.

In Fall 2013 faculty from the natural and social sciences will team up to teach an interdisciplinary seminar on the Arctic region. Vincent Gallucci, Canadian Studies Center and Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Ben Fitzhugh, Anthropology, Jody Deming, Oceanography, and Christine Ingebritsen, Center for West European Studies and Scandinavian Studies, will co-lead the seminar open to students from across campus.

The Fall 2013 seminar will explore the Arctic as an emerging region in the 21st century from a variety of perspectives – climate and ocean change, human rights, changes to the cryosphere (sea ice, permafrost, glaciers), indigenous concepts of Arctic territory, fisheries management and economics, community security (education, health, housing and food), international customary law, past human-environmental dynamics, global geopolitics, resource extraction and environmental ethics, and the interactions between the Arctic indigenous peoples and state entities in the policy dialogue.

The purpose of this seminar is to bring together students and faculty from across the U.W. to explore Arctic challenges and themes from an interdisciplinary perspective. The seminar will help advanced students develop policy-relevant, interdisciplinary research projects (individually or in teams) that could win two subsequent quarters of fellowship support for completion and publication. The seminar will include lectures by U.W. faculty, researchers and outside experts, and provide substantial brainstorming time for students and faculty to explore potential research projects. Students will then develop and write research proposals in conjunction with colleagues and faculty advisors.

Research proposals will be considered for Mellon Foundation Research Fellowships of $5,000 to support research and writing through Winter and Spring quarters, 2014. In Spring Quarter students will present their research at U.W. symposium and prepare manuscripts for submission to peer-reviewed publications. Fellows will receive $3,000 during Winter Quarter, and another $2,000 in Spring Quarter (after papers have been submitted).

The Principle Investigators for the grant project, Re-Imagining Area/International Studies in the 21st Century: The Arctic as an Emerging Global Region include: Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Vincent Gallucci, Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences, and Center for Quantitative Science; Cecilia Bitz, Department of Atmospheric Sciences; and, LuAnne Thompson, School of Oceanography and Program on Climate Change.

Mellon Project site: http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/mellon/
Fall Graduate Seminar site: http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/mellon/courses.shtml

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March 2013
New Canada Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies at U.W.

The Center's Arctic Initiative will work with colleagues across campus to further develop partnerships with Inuit organizations in the Arctic such as the Makivik Corporation in Arctic Québec (Nunavik). Charlotte Guard, Arctic Security Task Force student (far right) with Joë Lance, Executive Assistant to the President of the Makivik Corporation, and Kitty Gordon, Communications Officer, Makivik Corporation, Québec City (January 2013).

The new Canada Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies is part of the Center’s Arctic Initiative as well as part of a larger initiative on the polar regions being developed by the College of Arts and Sciences, College of the Environment, and Applied Physics Laboratory.

The Fulbright Arctic Chair will enable the UW to capitalize on its existing strengths to become a world leader in integrated multidisciplinary research, scholarship and teaching on the science, policy, and cultures of the polar regions. UW already has an unparalleled research and teaching program in the science of the cryosphere, and a vibrant and successful program in Arctic social sciences and policy.

The Center is working with the Quaternary Research Center, Program on Climate Change, Program on the Environment, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, to create a new academic program in Arctic studies, a scholars program for graduate students, postdoctoral and visiting scholars, and a strategy that ensures the flow of knowledge between the University and stakeholder communities in the polar regions including Arctic indigenous organizations and peoples. These partnerships establish meaningful linkages between natural and social scientists in an effort to address some of the most challenging environmental, economic and social issues of our time.

A Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies will bring scholars, practitioners and indigenous leaders from Canada to the U.W. The Chair will teach a required course for the new Arctic Minor (now in development), provide the annual Fulbright Lecture focused on emerging issues and developments in the Arctic region, and assist the two colleges in building collaborative relations with Arctic scholars, scientists, and indigenous organizations.

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May 2013
Fulbright Roundtable on the Arctic: Regulatory Processes & the Role of Canada’s Inuit in Shaping the Arctic Council
by Melissa Croce, Intern, Jackson School of International Studies

From left, Consul General of Canada, Denis Stevens, and presenters Tony Penikett, Sari Graben, and Vincent Gallucci.

The Canadian Studies Center, in collaboration with the Consulate General of Canada, Seattle, the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, Toronto, the sponsors of the Canada-U.S. Fulbright Chair, and the UW Future of Ice initiative, hosted the annual Fulbright lecture and roundtable on current insights into decision-making in the Arctic.

On May 30, scholars, students, and interested citizens gathered at the University Club, united by an interest in the increasingly complex topic of the Arctic. Organized by the Canadian Studies Center, the event discussed the Arctic in terms of scientific, legal and indigenous frameworks. Presenters included Sari Graben, 2012-13 Canada-US Fulbright Chair, Tom Axworthy, President and CEO of the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation, Toronto and respondents Tony Penikett, 2012-13 Jackson School Visiting Scholar, and Vincent Gallucci, Chair, Canadian Studies Center and professor in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

Sari Graben focused on the increasing role of scientists when developing and implementing international law relating to the Arctic. “My research is focused in how the use of expertise affects law,” said Graben, “and how we understand how science affects international relations.” There are several nations that lay claim to areas of the Arctic – the United States, Canada, Russia, Greenland and Norway – each of which must submit proposals to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf. Nation states are increasingly utilizing science to supplement their claims and strengthen their arguments for why they deserve more land. “The delineation of the Arctic shelf tells us something about when states are motivated to manage consensus and when they’re not. When they have this type of mutual beneficial interest in coming to a consensus, then they will exercise it,” said Graben. “They are looking for a common story that serves them all.”

While Graben focused on the legal and scientific relations of the Arctic, Tom Axworthy’s lecture focused on the political and indigenous frameworks of the Arctic, particularly concerning the Arctic Council. Established in 1996, the Arctic Council is an intergovernmental forum to promote coordination and cooperation among the Arctic states to help protect the Arctic and the indigenous communities who live there. Member states of the Arctic Council are Canada, Denmark (Greenland), Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United States.

Using the Arctic Council as an example, Axworthy discussed the three steps, or, “lessons” as he called them, on how to induce change in the international system. In relation to the Arctic Council, Axworthy described its origins with Mikhail Gorbachev who recognized the need to discuss the Arctic as an environmental region of concern in international politics. Gorbachev referred to the Arctic as a “zone of peace” in his famous Murmansk Speech (1987

The Arctic Council, thanks to successful indigenous internationalism, is the first international fora to include indigenous peoples on almost equal par with nation-states. With the subject of the Arctic becoming increasingly prominent in today’s international society, the Council is more prominent, becoming more involved in international affairs and helping to negotiate treaties and laws to protect the Arctic.

This event was made possible, in part, by Title VI grant funding from the Office of Postsecondary Education, International Education Program Services, U.S. Department of Education; and, the Chapman Charitable Fund.

The UW Canada Fulbright Chair is sponsored by the UW Office of Global Affairs; Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Social Sciences Division, College of Arts and Sciences; Graduate Fund for Excellence & Innovation, Graduate School; and, the Foundation for Educational Exchange Between Canada and the United States.

For information on the event and copies of papers: http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/outreach/contextualizingarctic.shtml 

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November 2012
Canada, the United States & the Arctic Council – Preparing for the Age of the Arctic
by Sophie Hubbell and Adam Akerblom, Arctic Initiative Interns, Canadian Studies Center & UW Freshman

(Left to right) Arctic Initiative Interns Adam Akerblom and Sophie Hubbell, Arctic Consultant Terry Fenge, and Arctic Initiative task force students Zoë Cosford and Charlotte Dubiel.

On Tuesday, November 13, key Arctic consultant Terry Fenge visited the UW campus and led a provocative roundtable discussion on the Arctic Council. Terry Fenge is an Ottawa-based consultant specializing in aboriginal, Arctic and environmental issues. Born and raised in the UK, he has degrees from the universities of Wales, Victoria and Waterloo. He has been both Research Director and Executive Director of the Canadian Arctic Resources Committee and for eight years was Research Director and Senior Negotiator for the Inuit of Nunavut in negotiations with the Government of Canada that resulted in the 1993 Nunavut Land Claims Agreement and the establishment of the Territory of Nunavut. From 1996 to 2006 he was Strategic Counsel to Nobel Prize nominee Sheila Watt-Cloutier, then President of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference. He has authored or co-authored six books, including Northern Lights Against POPs: Combatting Toxic Threats in the Arctic, with David Downie of Columbia University, and more than 70 papers.

Canada assumes the chair of the eight-nation Arctic Council in 2013 for a two-year term to be followed by the United States in 2015. Mr. Fenge argues that cooperation between the United States and Canada has the potential to put a major stamp on the circumpolar world. The scope of this premiere and people-driven institution is expanding particularly in its environmental agenda. The conclusion of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) in 2004 made the Arctic our world’s climate change barometer. Persistent organic pollutants found in the blood of Inuit women gave rise to matters of health, culture and women’s issues in the Arctic Council. However Mr. Fenge argues that the indigenous people need an adequate spokesperson to gain much needed attention from civil servants. One of the main issues facing the circumpolar world is the interests other non-Arctic states now have in the region. These would-be observers in the Arctic Council include states like India, China, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore. In reviewing The Declaration on the Establishment of the Arctic Council, Mr. Fenge provocatively argues it is hopelessly outdated and is in desperate need of reform. Nonetheless, we have a council that is functioning well and we are seeing, Mr. Fenge argues, a significant increase in the effectiveness of the council as a high level forum. Ultimately, Mr. Fenge claims Canada and the U.S. need to push a “reset button” with the region. The age of the Arctic is almost upon us and it is in our interests to engage people.

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November 2012
Oil in the Arctic - Decision Making Under Conflict and Uncertainty: Exploring the Environmental and Human Dimensions of Risk from Oil in a Changing Arctic
by Robert Pavia, Ph.D., School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

Instructors, Dr. Mary Baker of NOAA (left), Professor Tom Leschine (center) and Robert (right), meet after class session ends.

The School of Marine and Environmental Affairs is examining risks from maritime transportation and oil development in the Arctic in the face of change in the physical environment, ecosystems, and the human communities that depend upon them in a graduate course being offered autumn quarter. Graduate students from programs across campus are studying threats from oil in the context of conflicting values and human-induced changes in the Arctic, with a focus on decision-making affecting the future of the region. Understanding these problems in an international context, with an emphasis on Canada and native peoples, has been enhance by the with a guest lecture by Canadian Studies Center’s Nadine Fabbi on international relations & indigenous diplomacies in the Arctic.

The course provides understanding of theory and practice for environmental policy decision-making under conditions of uncertainty and social and political conflict, in the context of Arctic development. Continuing retreat of Arctic sea ice has opened the continental margin to increasing marine shipping and new oil exploration in an area that could hold 10% of the world’s remaining petroleum. Arctic shipping is increasing with commercial sea routes opening for both cargo and passenger traffic with associated pollution risks. The U.S. government has just released its Five Year Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program, which anticipates expanded oil development in the Arctic. Taught in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, students gain experience in addressing problems in the context of the real world requirements of an ocean management agency. Two students from the class will travel to Barrow Alaska to participate in a community meeting focusing on mitigating local consequences of these larger scale changes.

Robert Pavia is an affiliate associate professor of the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs. Robert has led projects including responding to human-caused and natural disasters, ecosystem-based management, and marine protected area management. 

Professor Thomas Leschine is the director and professor of the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs and an adjunct professor for the School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences. Thomas specialities include quantitative methods applied to resource management and environmental impact assessment, marine pollution management, and ocean policy studies. Thomas received his Ph.D. in 1975 from the University of Pittsburgh. 

Mary Baker is the Regional Manager of the Northwest Regions Assessment Restoration Division from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 

Course Flyer

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March 2011
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) Arctic Foreign Policy Symposium

Sponsors and discussants pose for a photo following the symposium. From left, Greg Poelzer and Heather Exner-Pirot, International Centre for Northern Governance; Ken Coates, University of Waterloo; Gary Wilson, University of Northern British Columbia; Thierry Rodon, Université Laval; Beverly Young, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada; and Ross Macdonald, Transport Canada.

 
In mid-March the International Centre for Northern Governance and Development, University of Saskatchewan, hosted a DFAIT symposium to showcase the research of past Circumpolar Fellowship recipients including Nadine Fabbi. Sixteen graduate students from across Canada – representing political science, history, education and other disciplines – provided differing approaches to Canadian policy initiatives in the Arctic.

Nadine, a doctoral student with the Educational Leadership and Policy studies program at the University of British Columbia, was one of ten students to be awarded a Canada’s Role in the Circumpolar World research fellowship in 2010. The fellowship supported the research and writing of the paper, “Toward a National Inuit Education Strategy.” Fabbi’s research explores the relationship between new concepts of territory found in international relations theory, particularly as these theories related to the Arctic region; and emerging Arctic foreign and educational policies.

Canada’s Role in the Circumpolar World research fellowships are co-sponsored by University of the Arctic and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, and are facilitated by the International Centre for Northern Governance and Development. The purpose of the fellowships is to foster innovative research and policy development on a range of issues related to Canada in the circumpolar world.

Funding to attend the symposium was provided by the Government of Canada and the Center’s Title VI grant, U.S. Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

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March 2011
Arctic Sovereignty at Edmonds Community College
by Donn Charnley, Professor Emeritus, Shoreline Community College

Donn Charnley

In the March course on Arctic Sovereignty, my understanding and knowledge of the Inuit in Arctic Canada was broadened. Since the mid-1930s I have visited, camped, hiked, climbed, sailed, and skied in Canada. I feel the need to know as much as I can about my warm neighbors as I can. I have been honored to know, and dance with, the Kwakwaka'wakw First Nations of British Columbia since 1958. To this end I have carved masks, made button blankets, and learned the appropriate songs for the dances I have been given the privilege to perform. But I knew little about the far North.

The course was taught by Nadine Fabbi as part of the Creative Retirement Institute at Edmonds Community College. Nadine discussed the history of contact in Canada's Arctic, between explorers and the Inuit, and the more recent issues concerning climate change. I was intrigued by who has sovereignty over these lands now that there is greater interest from those living outside the Arctic. Nadine is an excellent teacher, a knowledgeable and caring advocate for her native country and for its people. I look forward to learning more.

The Creative Retirement Institute is a member-driven, self-supporting organization whose mission is to provide quality, affordable educational opportunities for adults in a supportive environment. I have enjoyed taking and teaching classes for the Institute - they are always engaging.

I look forward to both taking more of Nadine's classes - and, hopefully, to have her in some of mine!

Donn Charnley is an Emeritus Professor of Geology, Shoreline Community College. For ten years he worked for the Seattle Public Schools as a teacher and high school counselor. He was also a Washington State Senator and Legislator and ski instructor for many years.

This event was sponsored by the Creative Retirement Institute and is part of a long-standing relationship between the Institute and the Center.

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September 2010
Canadian Studies & University of the Arctic

Students from Sakha State University in Yakutsk, Russia, graduate with a major in Circumpolar Studies from University of the Arctic.
Students from Sakha State University in Yakutsk, Russia, graduate with a major in Circumpolar Studies from University of the Arctic.

The Canadian Studies Center is the second institution in the forty-eight contiguous states (after Dartmouth) to have the opportunity to be a member of University of the Arctic—a network of over one hundred institutions dedicated to research and education that benefits northerners. In June, UArctic held its thirteenth meeting at Sakha State University in Yakutsk, Russia. The meeting was attended by Council Representatives from across the Arctic, including Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director of the Canadian Studies Center.

Meeting highlights included the introduction of UArctic’s new Vice President of Indigenous Affairs, Jan Henry Keskitalo. Keskitalo has served on the Board of Governors for UArctic and is presently the Executive Chairperson of the World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium. Fabbi sat on a committee with Keskitalo during the four-day meetings to discuss ways to strengthen indigenous education and traditional knowledge in UArctic research and programming.

Gary Wilson, University of Northern British Columbia and Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium board member, invites University of the Arctic to meet at UNBC in 2014 at the UArctic meetings in Yakutsk.
Gary Wilson, University of Northern British Columbia and Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium board member, invites University of the Arctic to meet at UNBC in 2014.

Kirsi Latola, Program Coordinator, Thematic Networks Office, provided an overview of these research-based, issues oriented institutional networks. The thematic network, “Arctic Coastal and Marine Issues,” includes two University of Washington scientists—Marc Miller, Marine Affairs, and Vincent Gallucci, Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and affiliated faculty of Canadian Studies. As Canada has one of the largest Arctic coastal environments, this network is critical to Center research projects.

UArctic has a Circumpolar Studies Program that is currently being accessed by UW Marine Affairs undergraduate, George Roth. The Center hopes to extend these opportunities to more students in the future.

As part of UArctic activities, the Center is currently working with the Makivik Corporation of Québec to involve Inuit students in the 2011 Task Force on Arctic sovereignty.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

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Winter 2009
Arctic Sovereignty Lecture Series

Mikhail Alexseev
Mikhail Alexseev, Political Science, San Diego State University, points out that within the next few years the Northern Sea Route that follows the Russian coastline (see background map), could be open for shipping. This would significantly reduce transportation costs and is one reason for the enhanced interest in the Arctic.

This Winter Quarter several programs teamed up to offer a lecture series that addressed Arctic sovereignty from the perspective of science, politics, history and international foreign policy serving approximately 250 faculty, staff and community members. Greg Shelton, Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies, wrote the project grant for the series.

The Arctic Sovereignty lecture series provided new thinking on the circumpolar region from the perspective of science, politics, history and international foreign policy. It brought together a wide-range of audience interests and spurred much thinking on this fast emerging global issue.

The University’s own Christine Ingebritsen of Scandinavian Studies kicked off the series with her presentation entitled, “Arctic Sovereignty and Climate Change: A Nordic Perspective” that provided a special focus on Greenland and the November 2008 referendum on independence.

The following week, Barry Zellen, author, researcher, and lecturer from the Center for Contemporary Conflict, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, discussed the issues, challenges and opportunities associated with the modernizing Arctic. Zellen’s lecture entitled, “Toward a Post-Arctic World,” looked at the evolution of Inuit self-governance across Alaska, Canada and Greenland and the increased mobilization of indigenous peoples.

In late February, UW alumnus Mikhail Alexseev, Political Science, San Diego State University presented, “Russia’s Northward Perspective: The Arctic Promise vs. the Siberian Curse” that provided an innovative perspective on Russia’s long-standing interests in the Arctic. There was much discussion of the 2007 planting of the Russian flag at the sea bottom of the North Pole and how this was perceived internationally.

The final lecture, “Globalization and Climate Change: Challenges in the New Maritime Arctic,” by Lawson Brigham, US Arctic Research Commission, Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment dealt with the need for international collaboration on the “race” for Arctic resources.

The interdisciplinary nature of this series was noteworthy. Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies and the Canadian Studies Center hope to foster such collaborative relationships in the future as we continue to recognize and celebrate the interconnectedness of a variety of academic areas. We were particularly pleased to broaden our network by working for the first time with the Polar Science Center and the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean.

The series was sponsored by the Canadian Studies Center (with support funding from a Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Program Enhancement Grant), Center for West European Studies, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Global Studies Center in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies; Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory; and the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean.

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Arctic & International Relations
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
Vincent Gallucci, Chair vgallucc@uw.edu
Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director nfabbi@uw.edu
Monick Keo, Webmaster monick@uw.edu