University of Washington

K-16 Professional Development

The Canadian Studies Center forms the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center (NRC) on Canada with the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University (WWU). Tina Storer, at WWU, serves as Education and Curriculum Specialist for the NRC. The Pacific Northwest NRC on Canada and the seven other NRCs in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, frequently collaborate to offer K-16 professional development programs addressing the Arctic as an emerging world region. Please see below for news on some of our most recent trainings.

June 2013
Archives on the Arctic: Connecting Global Issues with Primary Resources
In June 2013, twenty-three educators gathered at Metropolitan State University of Colorado, to learn about the role of the Inuit in Canada and globally thanks to a collaborative program partnership between the Pacific Northwest National Resource on Canada and Library of Congress. More ...

February 2013
Hood River Middle School becomes Arctic Living Museum
by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University
Sarah Segal, a teacher at Hood River Middle School in Oregon, attended the National Council for the Social Studies Conference in Seattle, WA this year for the wonderful professional development opportunities offered there. More ...

November 2012
Who Owns the Arctic? Pre-NCSS Clinic
“This is an area that few students know anything about yet is vitally important to the future of not only our country, but to the world,” said one participant. More …

November 2012
Inuit Political Leadership in Canada & the World Today
Arctic indigenous diplomacy and international relations in the Arctic today is an international phenomenon changing how we understand global affairs. More …


 

January 2012
Diana Mackiewicz, Eighth Grade educator at Eagle Hill School, Hardwick, Massachusetts, has utilized professional development workshops on Canada to introduce Canada’s Arctic into the classroom. In January of this year, her students produced a very impressive video on the Inuit culture. Diana is a graduate of the 2012 K-12 STUDY CANADA Summer Institute. See movie Mackiewicz made with her students!                    


February 2011
World Affairs Council and Center Collaborate on Educator Program – Who Owns the Arctic?
On February 16th, more than 30 Puget-sound area teachers gathered together at the Pacific Science Center for a workshop organized by the World Affairs Council. More ...


June 2013
Archives on the Arctic: Connecting Global Issues with Primary Resources

Twenty-three educators participated in Archives on the Arctic in Denver, Colorado.

In June 2013, twenty-three educators gathered at Metropolitan State University of Colorado, to learn about the role of the Inuit in Canada and globally thanks to a collaborative program partnership between the Pacific Northwest National Resource on Canada and Library of Congress.

The Arctic is emerging as one of the most important regions in our global world. Students need an understanding of this region, including its people, to help them understand about current discussions. – participant

For students to be citizens of the world, they must understand how events in one place affect people in other places. Understanding the issues of the Arctic and their impacts will help achieve this since this region is one they can relate to. - participant

On Day One of the program began with two lectures by Nadine Fabbi – “History of the Inuit in Canada and the Circumpolar North” and “Climate Change as a Human Rights Issue in the Arctic.”

The lectures were followed by a session by Michelle Pearson, Teacher Associate, Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources, and educator/historic preservation specialist for History Colorado. Michelle engaged the educators in an active exercise to illustrate how primary sources can be used to spur student interest in a topic. Most appropriately, the photo utilized was of a group of Inuit from Nunatsiavut in eastern Canada who travelled to Seattle in 1909 to participate in the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (World Fair).

Michelle gave a thorough overview of how to search for materials on the Library of Congress website noting the significant developments on the site over the last few years including tremendous new resources on Canada.

On Day Two, Nadine provided a third lecture entitled, “International Relations and Indigenous Diplomacies in the Arctic,” focused on how Inuit remapping and renaming of the Arctic region is facilitating a more effective Inuit voice in global affairs. The lecture introduced the Inuit concept of territory – nunangat – or territory as land, sea and ice.

Peggy O’Neill-Jones, professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver and director of the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources program at the University as well as the Western Region program, followed with a presentation on curriculum design.

Tina wrapped up the workshop with “best practices” for lesson plans and other sources for resources including the K-12 STUDY CANADA resource site http://www.k12studycanada.org/resources_teacher_resources.html. The creation of a lesson plan, or presentation at an educator conference, is required of all participants.

The participants represented 10 states – Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington – and ranged from social studies to science educators, heads of state geographical organizations to editors of educational journals. During time dedicated to exploring topics for lesson plans, a number of wide-ranging topics emerged. How do we understand Inuit concepts of sea ice and its potential influence on international law? How does the Arctic environment shape Inuit culture? Who owns the Arctic? How do we define the Arctic as a region? How is the Arctic serving as a barometer for global warming?

Educators noted that Arctic is nowhere in the U.S. curriculum yet, the region will be the most impacted by our activities than any other region now and in the future. They will go on to produce lesson plans to incorporate into their classrooms, to share with other educators, and to present at conferences.

Archives on the Arctic wiki website: https://archivesonthearctic2013.pbworks.com/w/page/66923556/TPS%20Level%20I

The program was generously funded by a grant from the Library of Congress, Western Region Program. Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies, was the Principle Investigator of the $20,000 grant. The purpose of the Teaching with Primary Resource grants is for the activities of the grants to continue into the future. The grants are for in-service professional development and educational programs for teachers and available on a rolling basis.

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February 2013
Hood River Middle School becomes Arctic Living Museum 

by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University

6th Grade students at Hood River MS displaying their skills, knowledge and research projects at an Inuit Cultural Fair on Friday, February 1, 2013.

Sarah Segal, a teacher at Hood River Middle School in Oregon, attended the National Council for the Social Studies Conference in Seattle, WA this year for the wonderful professional development opportunities offered there. New Social Studies Content Standards were recently adopted by the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and include a unit on the Inuit. After participating in a pre-conference clinic at NCSS called "Who Owns the Arctic? Arctic Peoples and Global Change" presented by the National Resource Centers on Canada, Ms. Segal returned to her school inspired to implement a 6th grade-wide cultural unit including exploration of the Inuit Nations of the circumpolar north. Sarah Segal describes the cross-cultural undertaking as a living-museum of students’ learning, enthusiastic generation of traditional artifacts, and participation in the culminating Arctic Cultural Fair activity - highlighting the role of Inuit Peoples of the Arctic Council.

Using resources and information from the “Who Owns the Arctic? Arctic Peoples and Global Change” workshop, along with ODE Social Studies Content Standards, teaching Inuit history created the foundation for the Arctic Cultures unit. Integrating science to investigate how cultures develop due to their environment led to expanding this unit to include ALL regions in the Arctic Circle. Comparing pre-1900 life-ways (prior to arrival of traders) to modern-day life-ways, further directed investigating environmental, social, economic, and political, changes that have taken place in the last century.
Students learned that in 2011, indigenous arctic peoples came together to create the Arctic Council and explored their role in assessing, create reports, and informing the general public about trade routes through the arctic, extraction of natural resources, and how global weather changes effect individual country's environments along the Arctic Ocean.

The entire Hood River Middle School 6th grade then spent the month of January developing a student-created ‘living museum’ Arctic Cultural Fair. Students learning was guided through use of the 8 Cultural Universals: Communication, Arts & Aesthetics, Recreation, Family Structure, Political Organization, Attitudes Towards the Unknown (+ Rituals), Economics, and Food/Clothing/Shelter. Every 6th grade student (180+) dressed to represent their arctic cultural, in addition to displaying a variety of technology presentations and object models of the cultural universals. These will included dancing, games, foods for sampling, murals, informational posters, student-generated and original artifacts, and much more. In addition, the Family and Consumer Science classes used traditional smoking techniques to prepare meat in the school’s native plant arboretum. Furthermore, students researched and created visual displays of their culture in regards to environment. For example, most arctic cultures find significance in the northern lights; treasure meat such as salmon, caribou, and walrus; and the festivals such as Christmas, are derived from folklore of a man bearing gifts on a sleigh and entering the home through chimneys' (because doors are buried under snow), comes from the Lapland Saami of Scandinavia.

On Friday, March 1st, from 1-2pm, the Hood River Middle School Multi-Purpose Room (MPR) was be sectioned into 6 geographic regions to represents the 7 Permanent Arctic Council. Homerooms broken into council members (Inuit, Athabaskan, Gwich’in, Aleut, RAIPON, and Saami) a ‘living-museum’ for public viewing was created.

The NRC on Canada presenters, Nadine Fabbi (UW), Tina Storer (WWU), Betsy Arntzen (U Maine) and Amy Sotherden (SUNY Plattsburgh) were delighted by this impressive outcome of their outreach. It is wonderful to see the impact of Ms. Segal’s newfound knowledge on her students as well as the entire 6th grade class at Hood River Middle School.
Congratulations to Sarah Segal, her fellow 6th grade teachers, and the entire class of students at Hood River Middle School for a job well done! You have not only met but exceeded new content standards and your successful approach will undoubtedly inspire others in the state and across the country to use your unit as a best practice model.

“STUDY CANADA,” the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada’s annual professional development workshop, has been offered by the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University for the last 34 years serving educators from almost every state in the nation. The Institute is funded, in part, by a Title VI grant from International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education. Paulette is a Humanities and World Language Teacher in the Ida B. Wells School for Social Justice and a U.W. graduate student in Education, Curriculum and Instruction (Multicultural Education). View the K-12 STUDY CANADA website.

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November 2012
Who Owns the Arctic? Pre-NCSS Clinic

Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada/Institute on Québec Studies, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh presents on her 10-day visit to Nunavik, Canada in 2009.

As part of the 92nd National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference, “Windows to the World,” a pre-conference clinic on the Arctic was provided to educators. “This is an area that few students know anything about yet is vitally important to the future of not only our country, but to the world,” said one participant. “By studying this topic, students can be involved with geography international relations, economics, and government.”

The Arctic is receiving increased attention as a result of climate change, natural resource exploitation, and sovereignty issues. The region has become one of the most dynamic international regions in the world argued by some to be the new center of world politics. Eight Arctic nation-states claim rights to the Arctic including Canada, the United States, Russia, Finland, Denmark (Greenland), Sweden, Norway, and Iceland. In addition, many non-Arctic nation-states are seeking entry into the Arctic Council. In 2013 Singapore, India, China, South Korea and possibly the European Union will submit applications to join the Arctic Council. In addition, six Arctic indigenous organizations have status as Permanent Participants on the Arctic Council marking the first time in history indigenous peoples and national states are working together to make decisions that will impact the circumpolar world and beyond. Governance over the region is complex and dynamic.

On Thursday, November 15th, sixteen educators representing eight states attended the clinic, “Who Owns the Arctic?” held in the Maple Leaf Room of the Consulate General of Canada, Seattle. Educators who attended the session gained an understanding of global change in the Arctic, Inuit contemporary views relating to identity and interdependence, self-determination, population dynamics, language, modernization, cultural transition, social problems, and environmental matters.

One participant noted, “Who Owns the Arctic?” is an important workshop that helped me think about the geopolitical effects on countries in relation to the problems and issues of the Arctic that many educators are totally unaware of … this workshop was critical in helping me understand the indigenous issues related to the Arctic.”

Nadine Fabbi, U.W. Canadian Studies Center offered an overview of the geopolitics and territorial claims in the region. Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada/Institute on Québec Studies, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and Betsy Arntzen, Canadian-American Center, University of Maine discussed their recent trip to the Canadian Arctic. Tina Storer, Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University, provided a presentation and packet of educational resources on the region.

This event was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers on Canada including the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS), University of Washington and the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University), the Northeast National Resource Centers on Canada (Center for the Study of Canada, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and the Canadian-American Center, University of Maine); the eight U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers in JSIS (including Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center); the East Asia Resource Center, JSIS; the Consul General of Canada, Seattle; and, the Government of Québec.

Program

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November 2012
Inuit Political Leadership in Canada & the World Today

Sixteen educators, representing eight states, attended the pre-NCSS clinic, "Who Owns the Arctic?" held at the Consulate General of Canada, Seattle.

As part of the 92nd Annual National Council for Social Studies Conference, “Windows to the World,” held in Seattle, November 16-18, Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center, offered a presentation on the effective involvement of the Inuit in domestic and international affairs and how that involvement is altering how we understanding international relations. The presentation covered some of the recent activities of the Inuit Circumpolar Council representing the Inuit in Russia, Greenland, Canada and the United States, and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Inuit association in Canada.

The presentation had ten participants each with a strong interest in international affairs. The participants gained an understanding of how global interdependence is shaping political institutions in the Arctic. The Arctic is an ideal lens via which to understand the broader issues of indigenous involvement in international affairs, social justice and environmental sustainability.

One participant noted that it was critical students understand what is occurring in the Arctic in order that they become more civically engaged particularly understanding the “cooperation among nations and indigenous peoples.”

This event was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers on Canada including the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS), University of Washington and the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University), the Northeast National Resource Centers on Canada (Center for the Study of Canada, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and the Canadian-American Center, University of Maine); the eight U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers in JSIS (including Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center); and, the East Asia Resource Center, JSIS.

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February 2011
World Affairs Council and Center Collaborate on Educator Program – Who Owns the Arctic?

Nadine Fabbi
Nadine Fabbi


On February 16th, more than 30 Puget-sound area teachers gathered together at the Pacific Science Center for a workshop organized by the World Affairs Council. Global Classroom was excited to partner with Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director, Canadian Studies Program (UW Jackson School of International Studies) and Zeta Strickland, education manager from Pacific Science Center for this three-hour program.

Both speakers encouraged teachers to grapple with the question (and title of the workshop) “The Arctic: Who Owns it and How Long Will it be There?” Nadine provided an hour presentation on policy formation by the eight Arctic nations and the unique role of Canada’s Inuit in Arctic governance. The evening ended with a visit to the NOAA designed “Science On a Sphere.” Teachers discovered how this room-size tool could be used to illustrate climate change, ocean temperatures, and other environmental and topographical information.

Participating teachers also received a 40-some page resource packet, a Canadian buffet dinner, and three clock hours. The evaluation responses were incredibly positive. In fact one teacher wrote: “A whole day (workshop) would have been awesome!”

About 40 local educators attended the workshop on the future of the Arctic.
About 40 local educators attended the workshop on the future of the Arctic.

Workshop information:
http://www.world-affairs.org/calendar.cfm?eventID=1379&action=eventDetails
In a few weeks, the resource packet will be available on line here:
http://www.world-affairs.org/globalclassroom/resourcepackets.htm

The Global Classroom program connects teachers and students with international resources, ideas, and people through a combination of professional development trainings, speaker series, curriculum design, and youth programs. The Arctic: Who Owns It and How Long will it be There, was one of a dozen teacher workshops that the World Affairs Council organizes every year.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

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Arctic & International Relations
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
Vincent Gallucci, Chair vgallucc@uw.edu
Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director nfabbi@uw.edu
Monick Keo, Webmaster monick@uw.edu