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Student News

Students from across the University of Washington benefit from Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Arctic-focused courses and mentoring. In particular, the Task Force on Arctic studies has provided training and placement for International Studies majors. Please find below recent news from students engaged in Arctic studies and research.

February 2014
President Young Signs UW Arctic Minor!
by Naqiah Azhar, from The Daily, February 4, 2014 Issue, University of Washington
The interdisciplinary minor in Arctic Studies at the University of Washington – part of UW’s Future of Ice – is a partnership between the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, and the School of Oceanography, College of the Environment, in collaboration with University of the Arctic. The purpose of the Arctic Studies minor is for undergraduates to have an opportunity to gain skills relevant to addressing major science and policy issues in the Arctic.  More ...

July 2013
Ross Coen, Doctoral Student & Author Gives Talk on Resource Development in Canada’s Arctic
Ross Coen, a Ph.D. student in the History Department and author of, Breaking Ice for Arctic Oil, gave a presentation “Historical Perspectives on Environmental Stewardship and Resource Development in the Canadian Arctic” at the Jackson School’s Community College Master Teacher Institute in July. More ...

March 2013
Task Force on Arctic Security Reception & Expert Evaluation
The end of Winter Quarter was a busy one for the students in the Task Force on Arctic Security. More ...

February 2013
Task Force 2013 Trip to Québec City & Ottawa!
by Charlotte Dubiel, Kevin Shaw, and Binh Vong, Task Force 2013 Students
For the 12 student members of the JSIS 495 Arctic Task Force on Arctic Security, the research trip to Canada flew by in a whirlwind of Arctic security studies. More ...

Winter 2012
Arctic Governance Task Force Presents at the UW Annual Undergrad Research Symposium
The 2011 Task Force on Arctic Governance team presented their research at the UW Annual Undergrad Research Symposium. More ...

 

August 2012
Center Welcomes New Affiliated Graduate Student in Arctic Legal Studies
Wes Kovarik, Law School and International Studies, is pursuing research on Canada’s Arctic claims. More …

May 2011
The Arctic Governance Task Force at the Canadian Embassy, Washington, D.C.
During week six of the quarter, I would normally be engaged in studying for midterms, writing papers, and being in the midst of another typical, but jam-packed quarter, but from May 4th to May 8th, I had the privilege of being able to travel to Washington D.C. to make a presentation on behalf of the Jackson School of International Studies about my senior capstone project called Task Force. More ...

April 2011
Reflections from the Evaluator of the SIS 495A Task Force on Arctic Governance
By Julie Gourley, U.S. Senior Arctic Official, Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs, U.S. Department of State and Expert Evaluator, Task Force
I served as the evaluator for the Task Force 2011 project entitled, “Melting Boundaries: Rethinking Arctic Governance.” More...

February 2011
Task Force Mentioned on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network
Kelsey Barrett, editor of the Task Force on Arctic Governance, was interviewed by the Canadian Aboriginal Peoples Television Network at the 40th anniversary gala for the Canadian Inuit association, the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, in Ottawa. She poses with John Bryan, Task Force researcher on the impacts of climate change on the environment. See 2 February 2011 newscast. More...

January 2011
Embracing the Arctic: JSIS Task Force
Ottawa in January might not be everyone’s dream destination, but for 14 UW students and two visiting Inuit students taking a course on Arctic governance, it was the place to be. They walked miles in blizzard conditions. They ate musk oxen and caribou... More...

Spring 2009 
Arctic Governance Task Force Presents at Research Symposium
by Kristen Olsen, 2009 Arctic Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty 
The Twelfth Annual UW Undergraduate Student Symposium is an opportunity for undergraduates to showcase exciting fields of research to fellow students, UW faculty, and community members. Presenting my group’s Task Force research at the 2009 Symposium was an unforgettable academic experience. More ...


February 2014
President Young Signs UW Arctic Minor!
by Naqiah Azhar, from The Daily, February 4, 2014 Issue, University of Washington

The proposal for a new interdisciplinary minor in Arctic Studies by the Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Oceanography, and College of the Environment has been approved.

Vincent Gallucci, chair of the Canadian Studies Center in the Jackson School and director of the Center for Quantitative Sciences in the College of the Environment, said the minor initiative, the first of its kind outside of Alaska, is part of a larger mission to educate students on the globe-spanning social and ecological impacts of climate change affecting the poles of the planet.

“It’s absolutely the right timing, if not even late, to be trying to learn as much as possible about those poles — what will happen to them and what will be the consequences for the rest of the world,” Gallucci said. “Training students to be knowledgeable and capable of working in these environments is a major function of a university.”

The lead-up to the proposal for the minor introduced four courses starting Winter 2014 available under the new ARCTIC prefix in the UW course registration catalog. The establishment of the minor will give undergraduate students the opportunity to obtain the relevant skills with the objective of tackling major science and policy issues in the Arctic.

Nadine Fabbi, associate director of the Canadian Studies Center, said that training experts for the future is important in order to deal with this critical emerging region.

“[Access] to new resources are opening up, shipping lanes are opening up, indigenous peoples are working with nation states on decision making for the Arctic region,” Fabbi said. “All those are new things that are occurring.”

The Canadian Studies Center has had an Arctic initiative for more than a decade and had become involved with the University of the Arctic, a collaboration of universities, colleges, and organizations with an interest promotion research and education in the Arctic, in 2008. The partnership with the University of the Arctic in the minor initiative means that UW students can engage in arctic-subarctic research collaboration apart from taking up courses offered by the northern network of institutions. Fabbi added that being a part of the University of the Arctic network offers UW students the opportunity to be involved in a global virtual university. “It’s a terrific opportunity to be involved with students from around the circumpolar world. Students can be a part of a network that’s really trying to build a regional identity through education,” Fabbi said.

In a 2010 report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, minimum Arctic sea ice extent observed each September has diminished by a 12 percent average per decade compared to the 1979-2000 average. As climate change continues to alter the polar landscape and environment, unmeasurable shifts in the social, economic, and political foundations of populations in the circumpolar region require the attention of the social sciences. The Arctic studies interdisciplinary minor will be an educational intersection of policy, culture and science while simultaneously addressing the opening up of the emerging region on an extensive international scale.

“The nature of the minor is trying to offer a perspective on the Arctic that includes both the natural sciences and social sciences,” said senior Walter O’Toole, an English major who is interested in Inuit literature. “Any student interested in policy and natural sciences should definitely look into [pursuing] the minor.”

Fabbi also talked about the relevance of major science and policy issues at the Arctic gaining place in academic instruction.

“One of the beauties of this minor is that we designed it in such a way that it isn’t a stand-alone. There are electives from 20 different departments. [The minor] is meant for students to build on their major but also to look at it through the lens of the Arctic,” Fabbi said.

View original article from The Daily here: http://dailyuw.com/archive/2014/02/04/news/new-arctic-studies-minor-approved#.UvKDEUJdW1J
View Arctic Minor Website: http://www.jsis.washington.edu/arctic/minor/

The Arctic Minor Steering Committee co-chairs Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center;
Vincent Gallucci, Canadian Studies Center and School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences; Rebecca Woodgate, Co-Chair, Applied Physics Laboratory and Oceanography; and,
Jody Deming, Oceanography wishes to thank the members of the Arctic Minor Steering Committee for their time and dedication in putting together the application for the new minor and courses. A special thanks to Ben Fitzhugh, Anthropology; Gary Hamilton and Don Hellmann, Jackson School of International Studies; Clare Ryan, Program on the Environment and Environmental and Forest Sciences; and, LuAnne Thompson, Oceanography and Program on Climate Change.

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July 2013
Ross Coen, Doctoral Student & Author Gives Talk on Resource Development in Canada’s Arctic at the Annual Community College Master Teacher Institute

Ross Coen with 2013 Community College Master Teacher Institute participants.

Ross Coen, a Ph.D. student in the History Department and author of, Breaking Ice for Arctic Oil, gave a presentation “Historical Perspectives on Environmental Stewardship and Resource Development in the Canadian Arctic” at the Jackson School’s Community College Master Teacher Institute in July.

Upon discovery of the Prudhoe Bay oil field on Alaska’s North Slope in 1968, the proposed construction of pipelines, drilling pads, offshore terminals, tankers, and other infrastructure stood to threaten the environmental integrity of the Canadian Arctic and challenge Ottawa’s claims of sovereignty over the lands and waters of the region. At the same time, however, American development proposals afforded an opportunity for Canada to frame its own Arctic resource policies in the context of ecological stewardship. This presentation will provide a historical context for present-day debates about Arctic resource development by examining the political, diplomatic, and technological facets of the Alaska “oil rush” of the late 1960s.

Ross Coen is a Ph.D. student in the UW History Department where he is studying the 20th century American West, in particular the intersections of environment, technology, and politics in Alaska fisheries. His 2012 book, Breaking Ice for Arctic Oil, examines the political and technological history of the SSManhattan, an icebreaking tanker that transited the Northwest Passage in 1969 in order to test the viability of shipping Alaska North Slope crude oil via circumpolar marine routes. Ross formerly worked on climate change policy in the office of Senator Ted Stevens and on rural energy development for the Alaska Center for Energy and Power (ACEP), an applied research institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

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March 2013
Task Force on Arctic Security Reception & Expert Evaluation

Tony Penikett, Expert Evaluator for the Task Force on Arctic Security, stands in front of the student poster.

The end of Winter Quarter was a busy one for the students in the Task Force on Arctic Security. They provided a public presentation of their research trip to Québec City and Ottawa and, the following day, presented their research projects to expert evaluator, Tony Penikett, former premier of the Yukon.

On Thursday afternoon, March 14th, the students in the JSIS 495G Task Force on Arctic Security, gave a 30-minute presentation on their research trip to Québec City and Ottawa. Hannah Dolph gave an overview of the visits in Québec City including to the Inuit Makivik Corporation, l’Université Laval, the National Assembly and more. Hannah was followed by Max Sugarman and Rachel Tam who discussed the visit to the Canada Conference Board, Nunavut Sivuniksavut, the national and international Inuit associations, and dozens of other visits with organizations and scholars in Ottawa.

The research trip to Québec City and Ottawa was part of the course that looked at the many ways one can approach security in the Arctic – from food security to educational security to health, social services, and even housing security. From January 26th to February 2nd the students travelled to Canada where they met with over 40 individuals representing numerous offices, organizations and areas of research.

The reception began with friend of the Center, Consuelo Corbett, playing piano including a beautiful rendition of O Canada. The student presentations were completed with a 10-minute focus on Québec’s role in the Arctic by Nicholas van Tulder. At the end of Nicholas’ presentation, Vice President of Sociéte d’habitation du Québec, Jean-François Arteau, stood up and personally congratulated the Task Force student for providing the “best overview of Plan Nord and Plan Nunavik I have ever heard!”

The following day each of the 12 students presented their research projects to expert evaluator, Tony Penikett. The projects included “Ending the Northwest Passage Dispute: How Inclusion of Inuit Perspectives on Sea Ice could Build a more Effective Strategy for Canada;” “Le Québec Total: Creating a Unifying Vision for Northern Development;” and, “Education in Canada’s Arctic: The Nunavut Sivuniksavut Program as an Inuit-Centered Model.”

Penikett offered challenging and insightful remarks to the students. He was joined by Donat Savoie, President, Inuit, Arctic and Circumpolar and Jean-François Arteau.

Already students from the Task Force on Arctic Securities are receiving tremendous success. Hannah Dolph was just awarded a Killam Fellowship to study in Ottawa next year and Zoë Cosford was hired as an intern by the Pacific Northwest Economic Region.

For the full Task Force report, Equatorial North: Centering the Arctic in Global and Local Security, the research report to Québec City and Ottawa, and other materials from the 2013 Task Force on the Arctic, click here: http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/courses/arcticpolicy.shtml

The program was supported by the Government of Québec (Visiting Professor & Québec Unit grants); the Centers for Global Studies & Canadian Studies (International and Foreign Language Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education); the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Hellmann Fund for Innovation and Excellence in International Studies; International Studies Program Discretionary Fund; Maxwell M. and Julia Fisher Endowment; and, the Chapman Charitable Fund. Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies, and Joël Plouffe, Visiting Québec Professor, co-taught the course.

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March 2013
Task Force 2013 Trip to Québec City & Ottawa!
by Charlotte Dubiel, Kevin Shaw, and Binh Vong, Task Force 2013 Students

Task Force students visit the Nunavut Sivuniksavut - a school for the Inuit of Nunavut in Ottawa.

For the twelve student members of the JSIS Arctic Task Force, the past week flew by in a whirlwind of security studies. We spent every day attending conferences and dialoguing with individuals at the forefront of Arctic politics and research. The program kicked off with a morning tour of historic Québec City, where we trekked through ice, snow and freezing temperatures while marveling at the breathtaking, centuries-old architecture. In true Arctic fashion, we took an ice-breaking ferry across the St. Lawrence and marveled as the boat navigated along the frozen river. In following days, we heard presentations from the Québec government, research institutions, and aboriginal organizations. Each speaker gave us a unique perspective on issues surrounding Arctic security.

On the day we departed lovely, francophone Québec, freezing rain painted the ground with a deadly sheen of ice. Treading carefully, we journeyed to the ROC (Rest of Canada) by train, where we were very fortunate to stay in a magnificent bed and breakfast. Our hosts in Ottawa greeted us with incredible hospitality, showcased by a delicious, made-from-scratch apple pie upon arrival. While not eating copious amounts of pie and soup, we attended meetings in the American Embassy, the Canadian Department of Defense, the WWF, Canada’s number one think tank the CBC, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Inuit Circumpolar Council and, most importantly, met with our peers in the Nunavut Sivuniksavut School. In Ottawa we were challenged to broaden our investigation regarding sovereignty and security in the Arctic space towards developing recommendations for a comprehensive model of community resilience.

Returning to Seattle, we are eager to continue our research and begin drafting a policy report, which will be presented to Tony Penikett, former Premier of the Yukon Territory. Despite being exhausted from a week of traveling and days spent in transit, we are excited to base our report in new findings and a variety of Arctic perspectives.

The 2013 Task Force on Arctic Policy is a joint program between the Canadian Studies and International Studies centers in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington (UW). This year's Task Force on the Arctic has received support from the Government of Québec and will focus on the northern policies of the Government of Québec and Inuit of Nunavik in northern Québec. The vision of the program is to bring UW students together with their Inuit colleagues in Canada to address effective ways to govern the international Arctic region.

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August 2012
Center Welcomes New Affiliated Graduate Student in Arctic Legal Studies


Wes Kovarik, Law School and International Studies, is pursuing research on Canada’s Arctic claims. He plans to continue his prior research of international law, nuclear security, and energy development by examining Canadian Arctic policy. Wes will research the intersection of Canada's Arctic claims under international maritime law within the context of changing defense and energy priorities of other Arctic states.

The Canadian Studies Center, through its Graduate Student Professional Development program, works closely with schools and departments across campus to encourage and support graduate student study and research that includes Canada, the Canada-US relationship and Canada's role in the world contributing to the vibrancy of Canadian studies at the UW. For a list of current graduate affiliates see http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/graduate/.

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Winter 2012
Arctic Governance Task Force Presents at the UW Annual Undergrad Research Symposium

 

2011 Task Force Arctic Governance Team

The 2011 Task Force on Arctic Governance team presented their research at the UW Annual Undergrad Research Symposium. Their panel was entitled, "Governance Issues in the Arctic Region" presented as part of the session, "Governance, the Environment, and Private Militaries." Joel Migdal, Jackson School of International Studies, served as the moderator.

 

 

 

 

Task Force mentioned in Seattle Times: seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/education/2015109878_symposium21m.html

For more information on the Task Force on Arctic Governance see the course website at: http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/courses/arctic.shtml

For more information on the U.W. Undergraduate Research Symposium see: http://exp.washington.edu/urp/symp/

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May 2011
The Arctic Governance Task Force at the Canadian Embassy, Washington, D.C. by Scott Halliday, Co-Editor, Task Force on Arctic Governance

 

Scott Halliday and Kelsey Barrett ham it up at the Task Force celebration dinner at the University of Washington in March.

As a mere undergraduate student in the International Studies major at the UW, I savor any opportunity to travel outside of Seattle. During week six of the quarter, I would normally be engaged in studying for midterms, writing papers, and being in the midst of another typical, but jam-packed quarter, but from May 4th to May 8th, I had the privilege of being able to travel to Washington D.C. to make a presentation on behalf of the Jackson School of International Studies about my senior capstone project called Task Force. Task Force is a class required for all undergraduate International Studies majors, where a group of students research a timely issue in international affairs and then publish a report with recommendations for an expert evaluator. I enrolled in the task force on Arctic governance. “Melting Boundaries: Rethinking Arctic Governance” was the name of the report that culminated from the research of 14 UW undergraduate students in the Jackson School and 2 Inuit students from Nunavik, the Inuit region in northern Québec. My fellow co-editor Kelsey Barrett and I presented the research and experiences of our team at the Canadian Embassy in D.C. Bolstered by a coalition of Jackson school faculty and staff, we had the honor of speaking in front of a group of academics, policy advisors, government officials, fellow UW alumni, and even decorated officers of the Canadian military.

It did not hit me to until I returned to Seattle, but what struck me as the most impressive part of the presentation in DC was how well attended the event was. There were over 100 guests, who took time out of their busy lives to come hear about the findings of our report, not because they were doing it as an assignment for a class or because a professor was giving them extra credit, but because the report that we published was informative, current, and impressive. This is a tribute to the outstanding research and analytical writing performed by the students of the class as well as their excellent recommendations. Being in such a cosmopolitan city as Washington DC which moves to the beat of its politicians and their agendas, it was very gratifying to know that our report and our work was being heard and considered by the foremost policymakers on Arctic affairs. Simply being in Washington DC and trying to grapple with the convergence of government politicians, international and domestic policymakers, and influential scholars was an eye-opening experience and one that I did not fully comprehend in Seattle.

As such, the trip and time I spent in Washington DC will stay with me for the rest of my life. I had the opportunity to engage with my professors in an academic and business-like environment outside of Seattle, where I gained a sense of context about the significance of both my task force and of the Jackson School of International Studies. Outside of my time spent presenting the report, I had the pleasure of some light sight-seeing around DC, connecting with close friends, and enjoying the company of some inspirational faculty members. I will never forget these fun times and sharing the work of my task force team in our nation’s capital!

The 2011 Task Force on Arctic Governance is a joint program between the Canadian and Global Studies Centers in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington and part of the Canadian Studies Center and Makivik Corporation, Nunavik, Canada, Educational Initiative. The Ottawa Research Trip is sponsored by the Canadian and Global Studies Title VI grants, International Education Programs Service, U.S. Department of Education; Government of Canada; Hellmann Fund for Innovation and Excellence; Maxwell M. and Julia Fisher Endowment; International Studies Program Discretionary Fund; Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Wilburforce Foundation, Seattle; and Makivik Corporation.

For more information on the Task Force on Arctic Governance see the course website at: http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/courses/arctic.shtml

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April 2011
Reflections from the Evaluator of the SIS 495A Task Force on Arctic Governance
by Julie Gourley, U.S. Senior Arctic Official, Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs, U.S. Department of State and Expert Evaluator, Task Force

 

Julia Gourley, (second from right, front), U.S. Senior Arctic Official, Office of Ocean and Polar Affairs, U.S. Department of State, poses with the Task Force class at the end of the Expert Evaluation.

On March 10, 2011, I served as the evaluator for the Task Force 2011 project entitled, “Melting Boundaries: Rethinking Arctic Governance.” The undergraduate participants in this project did an outstanding job with their research and policy recommendations. They clearly put a lot of work into their individual topics, and each student or group of students gave an excellent presentation.

The students exhibited creativity in developing their recommendations to governments. Some of the recommendations were very similar to policies the U.S. State Department has already pursued or is considering pursuing. Others were insightful and creative even if not practical (which they would not know without the full picture across government). It was clear from their work that they were intellectually interested in the subject and learned a lot from their research and their excursion to Canada where they met with a number of key players in Arctic policy both in Canada and the U.S.

The experience was also valuable for me. It is always good for government policymakers to be exposed to fresh thinking on key issues we handle on a daily basis. It is good to learn that college students are now studying the Arctic and thinking about policy for the region. An Arctic-focused program of study would hopefully encourage students to consider careers in the federal government, particularly in foreign policy. The government needs smart, energetic, creative thinkers to make the best policy for the United States, and foreign policy is not something most college undergraduate students think about for their future careers. This program at the Jackson School is very unique in that it targets undergraduate students – something very few American colleges and universities are doing to my knowledge.

The Task Force on Arctic Governance is a joint program between the Canadian and Global Studies Centers in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington and part of the Canadian Studies Center and Makivik Corporation, Nunavik, Canada, Educational Initiative. The 2011 Ottawa Research Trip was sponsored by the Canadian and Global Studies Title VI grants, International Education Programs Service, U.S. Department of Education; Government of Canada; Hellmann Fund for Innovation and Excellence; Maxwell M. and Julia Fisher Endowment; International Studies Program Discretionary Fund; Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies; Wilburforce Foundation, Seattle; and Makivik Corporation.

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Spring 2009
Arctic Governance Task Force Presents at Research Symposium
By Kristen Olsen

Kristen Olson just graduated with an undergraduate degree in International Studies. She was part of the Winter Quarter Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty and wrote her chapter on Russia’s involvement in the Arctic. Kristen just left Seattle to serve with Teach for America.

Arctic Governance Task Force Presents at Research Symposium
Members of the Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty, Kristen Olson, Gus Andreasen and Andrew Schwartz, presented their research on "Arctic Sovereignty and Governance" at the Twelfth Annual UW Undergraduate Student Symposium.

The Twelfth Annual UW Undergraduate Student Symposium is an opportunity for undergraduates to showcase exciting fields of research to fellow students, UW faculty, and community members. Presenting my group’s Task Force research at the 2009 Symposium was an unforgettable academic experience.

During winter quarter I had the privilege of working with a dynamic group of thirteen peers under the mentorship of two outstanding faculty members to produce a Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty and Governance. Task Force is a senior capstone project for students at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies where students work in an intensive group setting to produce a 200-300 page set of policy recommendations regarding pressing real world problems.

Our Task Force focused on the future of circumpolar relations among state and non-state actors in the Arctic, and contained extensive chapter analyses of environmental, legal, state, and indigenous concerns in the rapidly changing Arctic. For instance, one of the report’s chapters explored the tensions among and cooperation between the US and Canada over the Northwest Passage.

The primary reason our team wanted to present at the symposium was because of our exciting research expedition to Ottawa, where our team had unparalleled access to leading scientists, diplomats, Inuit leaders, and international lawyers expert in Arctic affairs. Our presentation at the symposium focused on our Ottawa insights, the catalysts for researching Arctic affairs such as climate change, an overview of the key state and non-state stakeholders, and examples of current hot-button issues such as Russia’s continental shelf claim.

As the coordinator of our group’s symposium presentation, author of the Russia chapter for our Task Force, and a graduating senior from the UW, I can say with confidence on behalf of my team that the symposium and Task Force experiences will propel all group members towards greater success academically and professionally.

The Task Force on Arctic Sovereignty and research trip to Ottawa was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Program Enhancement Grant, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada and Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education and Graduate Program Services.

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Arctic & International Relations
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
Vincent Gallucci, Chair vgallucc@uw.edu
Nadine Fabbi, Associate Director nfabbi@uw.edu
Monick Keo, Webmaster monick@uw.edu