University of Washington

Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships

The Canadian Studies Center is a recipient of a U.S. Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships program grant. The grant provides allocations of academic year and summer fellowships to assist meritorious graduate students undergoing training in modern foreign languages and Canadian Studies. Each fellowship includes an institutional payment and a subsistence allowance. The Canadian Studies Center is extremely proud in having awarded several Fellowships in least-commonly taught Canadian Aboriginal languages including Inuktitut, Dane-zaa, Musqueam Salish, and Anishinaabemowin.

FLAS Coordinator: Robyn Davies

Information for FLAS 2015-2016 application here
What is FLAS and how to apply? To view video, click here

FLAS Fellows 2014-2015
FLAS Fellows 2013-2014
FLAS Fellows 2012-2013
FLAS Fellows 2010-2011
FLAS Fellows 2009-2010
FLAS Fellows 2008-2009


2015-2016 FLAS Fellows

Branden Audet, International Studies and Technology Entrepreneurship, French
Academic FLAS 2015-16
My aim for this coming year will be to truly immerse myself in a new foreign language as well as explore new courses in foreign policy and security within the Arctic regions. I find Canada and the Arctic a treasure trove of natural resources and am very curious to see/shape the foreign policy and diplomacy in that regions – specifically with major players such as China and Russia eyeing the Arctic. It is my belief that the Arctic may be center stage in the future for irregular warfare and conflict.

Taylor Sproed, Law, French
Academic FLAS 2015-16
I am originally from the Seattle area. I received my BA from UW in Environmental Studies, where I also minored in French and interned at the Environmental Protection Agency. I am currently pursuing a Juris Doctor, and I hope to use the FLAS to study the role of Quebec in Arctic development and in international negotiations concerning Arctic policy.

Beth St. Clair, Law, French
Academic FLAS 2015-16
As my francophone studies grew, I became more and more interested in the Distinct Society that is Quebec. I was fortunate to spend a semester abroad in Quebec City and participate in in-depth studies of both the Politics and Government of the Province of Quebec as well as the Nation of Canada. I am excited to expand this scholarship into comparative Canadian Law. In the coming year, I hope to focus on the Canadian Constitution, Canadian Commercial Law and Quebec-Specific Language Laws. What I learn will empower me to be a diverse and internationally competent attorney.

Jason Young, Geography, Inuktitut
Academic FLAS 2015-16
I am a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography at the University of Washington, with an interest in the political implications of emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs) for indigenous peoples. More specifically, my dissertation research focuses on the use of digital technologies by Canadian Inuit to discuss and implement environmental management strategies in response to climate change in the Arctic. I am using my FLAS to learn Inuktitut and to learn more about Inuit culture and environmental politics in Canada.

2015 Summer FLAS Fellows

Branden Audet, International Studies and Technology Entrepreneurship, French
Summer FLAS 2015
My aim for this coming year will be to truly immerse myself in a new foreign language as well as explore new courses in foreign policy and security within the Arctic regions. I find Canada and the artic a treasure trove of natural resources and am very curious to see/shape the foreign policy and diplomacy in that regions – specifically with major players such as China and Russia eyeing the Arctic. It is my belief that the Arctic may be center stage in the future for irregular warfare and conflict.

Elena Barreto, Public Affairs, French
Summer FLAS 2015
I am currently enrolled in the Master of Social Work program at the University of Washington. I chose this program with the intention of learning how to better support immigrant families and communities navigate U.S. systems and assist them in benefiting from these systems and resource opportunities. I applied to learn French in order to serve the Canadian immigrant population since language is such a huge barrier when migrating to another country. Being able to communicate with clients is critical in order to get their basic needs and goals met, and be a support during a time of immense transition. I believe that pursuing education in other languages, starting with French, will help me further develop the professional skills needed to have the most positive impact on immigrant and refugee families’ lives.

Amie De Jong, Linguistics, Nuu-chah-nulth
Summer FLAS 2015
I'm learning Nuu-chah-nulth, a language spoken on Vancouver Island, B.C. by a declining number of native speakers. This language is a major part of Nuu-chah-nulth people's cultural heritage, and has some rare and interesting phonetic (sound-related) and syntactic (grammatical) features; this FLAS will allow me to study the language and its social context more in detail, and to help in preservation and revitalization efforts.

Jason Young, Geography, Inuktitut
Summer FLAS 2015
I am a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography at the University of Washington, with an interest in the political implications of emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs) for indigenous peoples. More specifically, my dissertation research focuses on the use of digital technologies by Canadian Inuit to discuss and implement environmental management strategies in response to climate change in the Arctic. I am using my FLAS to learn Inuktitut and to learn more about Inuit culture and environmental politics in Canada.

 

 

Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu