Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships

The Canadian Studies Center is a recipient of a U.S. Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships program grant. The grant provides allocations of academic year and summer fellowships to assist meritorious graduate students undergoing training in modern foreign languages and Canadian Studies. Each fellowship includes an institutional payment and a subsistence allowance. The Canadian Studies Center is extremely proud in having awarded several Fellowships in least-commonly taught Canadian Aboriginal languages including Inuktitut, Dane-zaa, Musqueam Salish, and Anishinaabemowin.

FLAS Coordinator: Robyn Davies

Information for FLAS 2014-2015 application here
What is FLAS and how to apply? To view video, click here
 

2013-2014 FLAS Fellows

Elizabeth Allen, Law School
Academic Year FLAS 2013-14, French 
"I am interested in studying Canadian policies and practices surrounding bilingual education. I hope to apply best policies and practices found in Canada to Washington state education programs for First Nation and English-Language-Learner students. " - Elizabeth

Michelle Daigle, Geography
Academic Year FLAS 2013-14, Anishinaabe
"I am Omushkegowuk Cree and a member of Constance Lake First Nation. I have an MA in Indigenous Governance from the University of Victoria and I am currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Geography. I am interested in how the maintenance and restoration of Indigenous food practices contributes to the larger process of self-determination by examining how they contribute to place-based identities. My research will focus on Anishnaabe food practices, including the wild rice harvest. It is my hope that this research will expand on understandings of food sovereignty and will contribute to the larger efforts of Indigenous empowerment."-Michelle

Michelle Daigle Studies First Nations Language - Anishinaabe

Caitlyn Evans, Law School
Academic Year FLAS 2013-14, French
Caitlyn is interested in studying U.S. and Canadian Arctic law and policy. She will explore how Arctic laws and policies impact the Arctic environment and indigenous populations. Caitlyn will study Inuktitut, an indigenous language, during the 2013-2014 school year. 

Wesley Kovarik, Law and International Studies
Academic Year FLAS 2013-14, French
"I am originally from Vancouver, Canada and graduated from UC San Diego in 2009 with a degree in International Studies. I am currently pursuing a Juris Doctor – International & Comparative Law and a Masters in International Studies – Peace and Security. My research concentration focuses on the relationship between international law, international security treaties, and nuclear affairs. My research will focus on the United States and Canada’s Arctic maritime claims as they relate to Arctic security and nuclear security concerns." - Wes

Brit Sojka, Marine and Environmental Affairs
Summer and Academic FLAS 2013, French
"With support from a Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship from the Canadian Studies Center, I will be studying Canada’s political response to cross-border interventions from foreign environmental NGO funders and, in particular, the political dimension of foreign funding related to Canadian oil development (Enbridge Pipeline/Canadian Arctic). With support of a Summer FLAS fellowship, I also greatly enjoyed the intensive French language studies offered during the summer quarter right here at the University of Washington!" - Brit

Congratulations to New FLAS Summer Fellows!

 


Spring 2014 
Michelle Daigle Studies First Nations Language - Anishinaabe

Michelle Daigle is Omushkegowuk Cree and a member of Constance Lake First Nation. She has an MA in Indigenous Governance from the University of Victoria and is currently a PhD candidate in the Geography department at the University of Washington. Her doctoral research focuses on food sovereignty for Anishinaabe people in what is now known as the Treaty #3 territory in northwestern Ontario. She is specifically interested in how Anishinaabe food practices are a pathway towards self-determination as defined by Anishinaabe people themselves.

As a 2013-2014 FLAS fellow, Michelle has been studying the Anishinaabe language (Anishinaabemowin) through an online program offered by the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire. Her study of Anishinaabemowin has been invaluable to her research as she learns day-to-day communication skills and is able to converse with participants. Also, she is committed to incorporating the Anishinaabe language in her dissertation as it communicates Indigenous knowledge and philosophical views in a way that cannot be expressed in the English language. For Michelle, the language is knowledge and the FLAS been invaluable to her own personal growth as well as professional development.

The Canadian Studies Center is a recipient of a U.S. Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships program grant. The grant provides allocations of academic year and summer fellowships to assist meritorious graduate students undergoing training in modern foreign languages and Canadian Studies. The Canadian Studies Center is extremely proud in having awarded several Fellowships in least-commonly taught Canadian Aboriginal languages including Inuktitut, Dane-zaa, Musqueam Salish, and Anishinaabemowin.

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Canadian Studies Center, June 2013, Report
Congratulations to New FLAS Summer Fellows!

Brit in awe of Banff National Park!

The Canadian Studies Center is proud to announce that Brit Sojka, School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, will be studying French this summer as part of her Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowships.

As a Master’s candidate with U.W.’s School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, my current studies are an effort to develop the scientific and environmental management skills needed to undertake future leadership roles within the Pacific Northwest’s environmental grant-making and nonprofit community. The large-landscape preservation interests of these organizations, make Canada’s vast wilderness areas and the policies governing the natural resources they contain an important research and future career focus. However, researching and effectively working in this arena also requires sensitivity to the well-being of Canada’s citizens, heritage and cultural diversity. The Canada Centre’s FLAS fellowship presents a unique opportunity to develop this very important cultural understanding and appreciation.

This summer, with support from a Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship from the Canadian Studies Center, I will be researching Canada’s political response to cross-border interventions from foreign environmental NGO funders and, in particular, the political dimension of foreign funding related to Canadian oil development (Enbridge Pipeline/Canadian Arctic). I am also looking forward to the intensive French language studies I will be immersed in right here at the University of Washington! – from Brit Sojka

The Canadian Studies Center is a recipient of a U.S. Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships program grant. The grant provides allocations of academic year and summer fellowships to assist meritorious graduate students undergoing training in modern foreign languages and Canadian Studies. The Canadian Studies Center is extremely proud in having awarded several Fellowships in least-commonly taught Canadian Aboriginal languages including Inuktitut, Dane-zaa, Musqueam Salish, and Anishinaabemowin.

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Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu