University of Washington

 December 2010 Report

Faculty Research & Teaching


The Center has sixty-five affiliated faculty representing sixteen departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, ten professional schools and all three UW campuses. Each quarter our faculty make marked contributions to Canadian Studies.


From left, Vancouver artist, Susan McCallum, Charlotte, Charlotte’s niece Jenoah, and Cynthia del Rosario, UW Director of Graduate Recruitment and Retention.
From left, Vancouver artist, Susan McCallum, Charlotte, Charlotte’s niece Jenoah, and Cynthia del Rosario, UW Director of Graduate Recruitment and Retention.

Book Launch for Charlotte Coté’s Spirits of Our Whaling Ancestors

by Charlotte Coté

The Book Launch Event on October 28th for Spirits of Our Whaling Ancestors was a great success! Tleko (thank you) to my family from Canada who came to support me and shared our beautiful Tseshaht songs and dances with the audience. I also want to thank the University of Washington Press and the Burke Museum for making this a wonderful event. Tleko to my family and friends, and everyone who came to show your support and helped make this such a memorable evening. Uu'uq ch'ap'ap 'athle'itsuu - You all make me happy!

Following the removal of the gray whale from the Endangered Species list in 1994, the Makah tribe of northwest Washington State announced that they would revive their whale hunts; their relatives, the Nuu-chah-nulth Nation of British Columbia, shortly followed suit. The Makah whale hunt of 1999 was an event of international significance, connected to the worldwide struggle for aboriginal sovereignty and to the broader discourses of environmental sustainability, treaty rights, human rights, and animal rights. It was met with enthusiastic support and vehement opposition.

 


Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


Center Partner’s with Foster School of Business to Enhance Canadian Content in International Business Courses

Stephen Blank (right), Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation, is introduced by Douglas MacLachlan, Chair, Department of Marketing and International Business, Professor of Marketing, and Marion Ingersoll Endowed Professor.
Stephen Blank (right), Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation, is introduced by Douglas MacLachlan, Chair, Department of Marketing and International Business, Professor of Marketing, and Marion Ingersoll Endowed Professor.

Visiting professor Stephen Blank provided a lecture to the students in Professor Mike Giambattita’s International Marketing course, MKTG 470 International Marketing entitled, “The Interface of Local, National and Global Production Systems: The North American Auto Industry". As the focus of his presentation, Dr Blank asked the students to examine a diagram of a module that becomes part of a finished car – a rear suspension assembly produced by Martinrea, a Canadian Tier I auto supplier, for a number of GM cars. Looking at this diagram, the students and Dr. Blank discussed changes in the structure of the auto industry including the decentralization of the supply chain network, the impact of logistics in this new system and factors that currently affect the North American freight transportation system, and the globalization of the auto supplier network. The class concluded with a discussion of the likely future of the auto industry in North America.

Giambattista’s course introduces the importance and management issues of international marketing. Students build on fundamental marketing concepts and their practical applications. Knowledge is used to analyze and understand international marketing as an integrated system. Most of the students in the course are candidates for the Foster Business School's highly regarded Certificate of International Studies in Business Program. The students felt that Blank’s lecture was informative and that it offered a new perspective on the high degree of integration of the Canada-U.S. auto industry.

Dr. Blank explains the interconnectedness of the North American auto industry to students.
Dr. Blank explains the interconnectedness of the North American auto industry to students.

The materials used in the class can be found on the Portal for North America website

Dr. Blank is a Senior Fellow of the Centre for International Governance Innovation that supports the Portal.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service as part of the North American Economic Partnerships initiative with the Global Business Center, UW Foster School of Business.

 


Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


Government of Canada, Faculty Research Grant Recipient, Lucy Jarosz, Examines Food Systems in Canada and the United States

SOLEFood inner city farm located on a quarter acre in Vancouver's downtown eastside.
SOLEFood inner city farm located on a quarter acre in Vancouver's downtown eastside.

Lucy Jarosz's research project, "How Local Food Systems Address Hunger" compares how hunger is addressed through community gardening and urban farming in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington. Through a series of interviews with gardeners, urban farmers, food distribution and food banking directors, it examines the motivations and experiences of the people working to produce and distribute fresh, locally and organically grown produce to those who cannot afford to buy it. This comparative project investigates the emergence and development of urban gardening and farming projects designed to give food to those most vulnerable members of each community in order to identify the constraints and challenges local food systems face as the numbers of hungry people increase in each nation due to changes in social policy, the current economic crisis and the continued global and regional rise in food prices.

La Cosecha Community Garden, which blends art and food and is part of the HEAL Program, a diabetes self-management program for Spanish-speaking residents of Vancouver            .
La Cosecha Community Garden, which blends art and food and is part of the HEAL Program, a diabetes self-management program for Spanish-speaking residents of Vancouver.

Lucy Jarosz is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography. Her research centers upon food and agriculture, rural poverty and inequality, and rural development and environmental change. She was awarded a 2010-11 Faculty Research Grant from the Government of Canada for her project comparing local food systems in British Columbia and Washington. For Professor Jarosz's homepage see: http://faculty.washington.edu/jarosz/.


 

 

 

 

 


 

Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


Associate Director, Nadine Fabbi Awarded Educational Studies Leadership Fellowship

Nadine was awarded a Leadership Award from the Education Leadership and Policy Studies program at the University of British Columbia to support her research on political activism occurring in the Arctic with a focus on the role of Canada's Inuit and Arctic higher education.

Nadine with students from Sakha State University in Yakutsk, Siberia at the University of the Arctic meeting in June 2010.
Nadine with students from Sakha State University in Yakutsk, Siberia at the University of the Arctic meeting in June 2010.

Arctic Aboriginal peoples are engaged in Arctic foreign policy and educational policy at the international level for the first time in history. They have claimed Permanent Participant status on the Arctic Council, a high-level intergovernmental body formed in 1996. This status provides Arctic peoples with a legitimate voice in resolving transnational issues almost on par with nation-states. In 2001 the Council endorsed University of the Arctic (UArctic), an international network of mostly Arctic institutions created in part to provide policy-relevant research to the Council. The UArctic mission is to provide education in, for and by northerners and claims to have a strong Aboriginal epistemological foundation. What is occurring in terms of the political mobilization of Arctic Aboriginal peoples has the potential to impact foreign policy and higher education in innovative ways.

The Inuit are one of eight Arctic Aboriginal peoples who are playing a key role in Circumpolar governance via the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (Canada's national Inuit association), the Inuit Circumpolar Council (international Inuit association), the Arctic Council and UArctic. Recently the Inuit have redrawn the map of Canada, renamed the Arctic region, and established an international Inuit sovereignty declaration. Nadine's research addresses these effective political strategies and asks what the impact of policy and spatial/territorial activism will have on Arctic foreign and educational policy in the future.

 

Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page

Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu