Canadian Studies Center October 2009 Report

 

June 2010 Report

Center & Circumpolar Initiative News


Canadian Studies Center Annual Reception

The Center's annual reception was the most impressive ever, celebrating the new Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellows, Killam Fellows, and over $30,000 in grants awarded to faculty and staff for student mobility and research.

Professor Anne Goodchild and Matt Klein, graduate student, were awarded a Government of Canada Mobility Grant to take students to the Detroit-Windsor border to conduct research on border wait times and freight mobility. The Global Business Center was also awarded a Mobility Grant for the annual MBA Study Tour. In 2011, MBA students Christopher Bajuk and Valery Potakh will lead the first Study Tour to Toronto.

Lucy Jarosz, Geography; Kathryn Bunn-Marcuse, Art History; and Charles Emlet, Social Work, UW Tacoma, each received Faculty Research Grants. In addition, librarians Siôn Romaine and Jennifer Sundheim both received grants from the Canadian Government, Matching Library Grant.

Ten FLAS Fellows were awarded for Summer 2010 and Academic Year 2010–2011. Congratulations to summer fellows Julia Day, Ethnomusicology, French; Bree McConnell, Ethnomusicology, French; Rachel Hanisch, Epidemiology, French; Charles Bloomfield, Communication, Sencoten; Jennifer Leider, Public Affairs, French; and Mark Wetzler, Spanish, French. Congratulations also go to academic year fellows Melanie Beckwith, Law, French; Julia Day, Ethnomusicology, French; Christopher Lizotte, Geography, French; and Bree McConnell, Ethnomusicology, French.

The 2010–2011 Killam Fellows were also celebrated. This year Ivy Gooch, Business Administration, will study at L'Université de Montréal and Gregory Johnsen, Economics and International Studies, will spend a semester at McGill University.

Congratulations to all our Canada awardees!

Canadian Studies Center Annual Awards Reception


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Indigenous Research Methods by Canadian Cree, Shawn Wilson

By Clementine Bordeaux

Clementine Bordeaux is a member of the Rosebud Lakota (Sioux) Tribe located in South Dakota. She is pursuing a Master’s Degree in Communication with Native Voices, an Indigenous documentary film program.

Photo with Shawn Wilson. L to R, back row: Allison Krebs, Shawn Wilson, Caroline Lanza, Amal Eqeiq, and Carol Warrior. Front Row: Chilan Ta, Michelle Kleisath, and Tia Gehlhausen.
Students in Professor Hart's and Professor Ross' graduate reseearch class with Shawn Wilson. Back row (L to R): Allison Krebs, Shawn Wilson, Caroline Lanza, Amal Eqeiq, and Carol Warrior. Front Row: Chilan Ta, Michelle Kleisath, and Tia Gehlhausen.

Dr. Shawn Wilson had a whirlwind visit to the University of Washington this Spring Quarter—full of classroom engagements, innovative presentations, small luncheons, large dinners, and the Native American Students in Advanced Academia (NASAA) annual Spring Symposium. I enthusiastically followed Dr. Wilson to as many events as my schedule would allow, each one more extraordinary than the next; hearts and minds that stimulated dialogue creating an environment of valuable reflection.

My initial introduction to Dr. Wilson was through his book, Research Is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods (2008), which explores relationality and relational accountability in academic research. The book is thoughtfully written and is accessible – the voice is not overtly academic. Shawn offers a text that welcomes the reader, engaging him or her to look beyond conventional methodologies. Originally written as his doctoral thesis, the book allows the reader to think about research as a conversation, a relationship rather than a means to an end. It is a book that any individual, Indigenous or not, would benefit from reading.

An Opaskwayak Cree originally from northern Manitoba, Dr. Wilson now resides in Australia with his wife and three children: Julius, Max, and Falco—whom he addresses directly in many of his works. One of the first questions Dr. Wilson asked me was, “Where are you from?” As an Indigenous person, it was a pleasure to meet an academic who openly recognizes a connection to the land. As his visit progressed, it was not long before students and faculty felt as though we were talking to an old friend. Dr. Wilson shows humility while engaging you to think in broader terms, with an open mind, by taking a positive approach to research.

A person he spoke candidly about was his father, Stan Wilson, who grew up in “the bush” of Canada and now has a doctoral degree. Having a strong background in education paved the way for Shawn to develop a keen interest in how Indigenous students in professional school could do well in the academic world while sustaining a strong connection to their Native identity. He is an ideal example of the power of education, travel and belief. There are times when we do not think of Indigenous Research on an international level, but Shawn has taken it from Canada to the world—a step, a thought, a paper, a conversation, a relationship at a time.

As the week dwindled down, I was left with a sense of accomplishment along with a feeling of empowerment. Dr. Shawn Wilson is just a man trying to open the doors to changing research methodologies for Indigenous people and beyond. I asked for his autograph in my book at the last event I shared with him, and he wrote, “Best of luck with your own Research Ceremony. Shawn Wilson.” Thank you for starting the dialogue, Dr. Wilson! 

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Program Enhancement Grant, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Government of Canada and Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

Shawn Wilson with attendees at the Native American Students in Advanced Academia (NASAA) symposium.
Shawn Wilson with attendees at the Native American Students in Advanced Academia (NASAA) symposium.

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Center Hosts Canadian Nation Builder

Don Chapman (center), effectively changed Canadian legislation in Canada, enabling members of the UW community, including Robert Stacey, Division Dean, Arts and Humanities and Linda DiBiase, Collections Development Librarian (proudly displaying her citizenship card), to obtain their Canadian citizenship.
Don Chapman (center), effectively changed Canadian legislation in Canada, enabling members of the UW community, including Robert Stacey, Division Dean, Arts and Humanities and Linda DiBiase, Collections Development Librarian (proudly displaying her citizenship card), to obtain their Canadian citizenship.

In April, the Canadian Studies Center hosted guest speaker, Don Chapman, finalist of the “Nation Builder of the Year” award by The Globe and Mail in 2007 and 2008. Chapman, a former UW student, has been the inspiration and effort behind the April 2009 Canadian legislation, Bill C-37, that amended the Citizenship Act to give Canadian citizenship to those who lost or never had it due to outdated provisions in legislation. Upwards of a million people can now call themselves Canadian citizens as a result. Chapman provided a roundtable discussion on “The Lost Canadians” legislation to faculty, students, and community members. He provided a background on the legislation including what it means to have Canadian or American citizenship and how children can still be born stateless.

This project was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Program Enhancement Grant, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Government of Canada and Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.


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UW Tacoma Library Receives Government of Canada Grant

Jennifer SundheimThe University of Washington Tacoma Library has received a Government of Canada Library Matching Grant as part of the Canadian Studies Library Support Program. Jennifer Sundheim, Head of Collections and Access Services for the University of Washington Tacoma Library, applied for the grant and intends to acquire monographs across a range of disciplines to support the integration of Canadian Studies across Tacoma's diverse curriculum.

Tacoma faculty from the Social Work, Education and Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences programs have participated in the Government of Canada Grant Programs to study in Canada in past years. Ms. Sundheim will also be consulting with Siôn Romaine, Canadian Studies Librarian for the University of Washington Seattle campus, to insure the monographs acquired will compliment the Canadian Studies materials throughout the University of Washington Libraries 16 different libraries.


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Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu