University of Washington

Canadian Studies Center November 2010 Report

November 2010 Report

Programming News


UW Libraries & Canada Collections

Sion Romaine (right) receives a Government of Canada Library Support Grant check from Kevin Cook, Political, Economic and Academic Officer, Consulate General of Canada, Seattle.

Note from the Canadian Collections Librarian - Vive le Québec!, by Sion Romaine, UW Libraries’ Canadian Studies Librarian
UW Libraries is pleased to announce two major acquisitions made earlier this year to support Canadian and Québec Studies at the University of Washington (UW).

Le Son des Français D’Amérique is a landmark series of 27 documentary films on traditional Francophone culture. Francophone culture is based largely on music, songs and dances handed down from generation to generation, even in places where the language itself was discouraged. Filmed between 1976 and 1984, the series shows the music, history and the presence of the four French-speaking people of America: the Québecois, Acadians, Métis and Creoles. UW is one of only two U.S. institutions to hold the complete set (the other is the Acadian Archives at the University of Maine-Fort Kent). Le Son des Français D’Amérique is now available for loan at the Libraries Media Center.

This purchase was made possible through the generous support of the Government of Canada; the Anna Murray and Charles Fremont Porter Endowed Library Fund; and the Canadian Studies Center’s Title VI grant, U.S. Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

The Québec Popular Music Collection demonstrates the immense musical, cultural, and linguistic diversity that characterizes the vast genre of popular music in Québec. Compiled by ethnomusicology student Cody Case with the aim of teaching the French language and Québec culture through popular music, the collection consists of recordings that demonstrate Québec’s eclectic varieties of music, and artists that are popular, well known and/or possess innovative musical and lyrical aesthetics. Titles in this collection are now available for loan at the UW Libraries Media Center.

This purchase was made possible through the generous support of the Gouvernement du Québec; and the Canadian Studies Center’s Title VI grant, U.S. Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

Finally, this fall UW Libraries received a grant from the Government of Canada to support the purchase of the 2010 Microlog microfiche set. Microlog is the clearinghouse for Canadian research and report literature in all subject disciplines. The set includes research, scientific, technical and annual reports, policy papers and statistical materials and is indexed in the Canadian Research Index, available online through the Libraries website.

The success of our students and researchers depends on access to high quality and often uniquely held resources. The generosity of our donors is greatly appreciated!

Romaine’s degree is from the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies at the University of British Columbia with a research focus in First Nations library services. Sion oversees the Libraries Subject Guide on Canada, provides a monthly notice of new Canadian Studies acquisitions, and serves as the Library representative on the Executive Council for the Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium.

 

Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


Outreach to Educators & Community

Center Increases Collaboration with the American Association of Teachers of French, by Mary Anne O’Neil, President, AAFT Northwest
The American Association of Teachers of French (AATF), founded in 1927, is the largest association of French teachers in the world (currently there are about 10,000 members). The AATF fall luncheon was held on 9 October 2010, at the conclusion of our annual meeting of the Washington and Oregon foreign language teachers. The luncheon was well attended by over 70 members from the United States and Canada.

American Association for French Language Teacher’s (AAFT) local chapter at the October AAFT conference at Seatac.
American Association for French Language Teacher’s (AAFT) local chapter at the October AAFT conference at Seatac.

Nadine Fabbi from the Canadian Studies Center was the keynote speaker. She began with an overview of the importance of the study of Québec in the United States. Québec is the only jurisdiction in North America where the official language is not English. “Québec is an extraordinary example of a minority culture and language not only surviving but thriving in North America,” she pointed out. In addition, Québec supports minority regional governments, such as the Regional Government of Nunavik for the Inuit in the Arctic region of the province.

After the luncheon, several young teachers expressed their interest in applying for travel grants to study in Canada and for library grants. Two seasoned teachers, musicians themselves, intend to contact the Léger family musicians living in Seattle about visiting their schools. We also anticipate that many of the French educators in attendance will take advantage of the Center’s annual Québec and French Canadian Workshop – the only all-day professional development training in French in the State that focuses on Québec that will be held in May on the University of Washington campus.

This event provided the opportunity for AAFT and the Canadian Studies Center to work in closer collaboration in the future to ensure that our French language educators are supported and have a stronger foundation in Québec culture and its distinct language.

Mary Anne O’Neil is a professor of French at Whitman College. She is currently serving as president of Region IX for AAFT. This visit was supported by funding from the Canadian Studies Center’s Title VI grant, US Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

 

Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


K-12 Study Canada Activities

In October, Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist at the Center for Canadian-American Studies (WWU) exhibited K-12 STUDY CANADA exhibited resources on

Tina Storer (second from left) with Karen Palmarini, Canadian Consulate of Canada, Denver, at the 32nd Annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Institute in Whistler, British Columbia, June 2010. In front, educator participants, Anastasia Sunday from Colorado, and Tom Cambisios, from Ohio
Tina Storer (second from left) with Karen Palmarini, Canadian Consulate of Canada, Denver, at the 32nd Annual K-12 STUDY CANADA Institute in Whistler, British Columbia, June 2010. In front, educator participants, Anastasia Sunday from Colorado, and Tom Cambisios, from Ohio

behalf of the National Resource Center (NRC) for Canada at the Idaho Council for History Education (ICHE) conference in Boise, Idaho as well as the Washington State Council for the Social Studies Fall In-Service at Edmonds-Woodway. At the ICHE conference, the executive director of the National Council for History Education, Peter Seibert, invited Tina Storer to write a regular column for the organization's History Matters! publication. This will be an exciting new avenue for our NRC to encourage greater connections to Canada in history classrooms particularly. In addition, numerous educators signed up to join the NRC's "Canada Listserv" to receive regular emails (September-June) about recommended resources for teaching about Canada in K-12 classrooms at these two conferences as well as at a NRCs on Canada exhibit at the recent National Council for Geographic Education conference in Savannah, Georgia.

The K-12 STUDY CANADA portal is a joint project by our NRC. See http://www.k12studycanada.org/.

The UW Canadian Studies Center joins with the Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University (WWU) in Bellingham to create a federally supported Pacific Northwest National Resource Center (NRC) on Canada. For more information on the Center for Canadian-American Studies at WWU see http://www.wwu.edu/canam/.
 

 


Welcoming the Region’s New Consul General

President of the Canada-America Society, Michael Herbst (left), and Washington State Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen (center), welcome Canada’s new Consul General, Denis Stevens, to the region.
President of the Canada-America Society, Michael Herbst (left), and Washington State Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen (center), welcome Canada’s new Consul General, Denis Stevens, to the region.

In late September the Center partnered with the Canada-America Society of Washington, Trade Development Alliance of Greater Seattle, and the Pacific Northwest Economic Region to welcome Canadian Consul General Stevens to the regional community. Mr. Stevens was welcomed to the region by Michael Herbst, president of the Canada-America Society. Herbst described the importance of the Canada-U.S. relationship to the region in his welcome. Lieutenant Governor of the State of Washington, Brad Owen, also welcomed Consul General Stevens.

Stevens provided a brief presentation on the role of the Canadian government in the U.S. and the importance of the Canada-U.S. economic partnership – one of the largest trade relationships in the world.

Attendees included the CEO of Esterline Technologies, and Honorary Consul for the United Kingdom, Bob Cremin; the Consul-General of Japan Kiyokazu Ota; Ambassador Alejandro Garcia Moreno, Consul of Mexico; Consul of the Republic of Korea, Haryong Lee; and, from the Canadian Consulate, Consul Wendy Baldwin and Trade Commissioner, Robert Fosco.

Wendy Baldwin, Canadian Consul, joins UW’s Mike Giambattista at the dinner following the reception. Giambattista teaches international business in the Foster School of Business and is the faculty advisor for the MBA 2011 Study Tour to Canada.
Wendy Baldwin, Canadian Consul, joins UW’s Mike Giambattista at the dinner following the reception. Giambattista teaches international business in the Foster School of Business and is the faculty advisor for the MBA 2011 Study Tour to Canada.

Several University of Washington faculty and students were there to welcome the new Consul General including Associate Dean of Public Health, Mark Oberle (Oberle just received a Government of Canada Conference Grant for a project on cross-border public health); Mike Giambattista, Foster School of Business faculty advisor for the MBA 2011 Study Tour; Greg Shelton, Global Trade, Transportation and Logistics Studies; Nadine Fabbi from the Center; Morna McEachern, Affiliated Faculty of Canadian Studies in the School of Social Work; Lucas Olson, 2009-10 Killam Fellow now with UW International and English Language Programs; and Victoria Choe, Assistant to the Director for the Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium and International Studies major.

Consul General Stevens joined Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) in 1996. Since 2007, he has been the Director General of Intergovernmental Relations and Public Outreach at DFAIT.

The reception was hosted by Schwabe, Williamson and Wyatt.

This event was supported, in part, by funding from the Center’s Title VI grant, U.S. Department of Education, Office of International Education Programs Service.

Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


Center Builds Ties with Whitman College Canadian Studies Association

In late September Jack Iverson, Director, Canadian Studies Association Whitman College, and Professor, Foreign Language and Literature, invited the Center’s associate director, Nadine Fabbi, to Whitman to visit with faculty regarding the enhancement of the Canadian studies program. Although none are dedicated specialists, about a dozen Whitman faculty taken an interest in Canadian matters, including in literature, environmental studies, French Canadian language and Québec culture, film and most interestingly, sport. Athletic director Dean Snider and basketball coach, Eric Bridgeland, are working on a project to build international understanding as part of the team’s training prior to a series of games to be held in British Columbia.

Jack Iverson, Director, Canadian Studies Association at Whitman College with Eric Bridgeland, coach of the Whitman basketball team.
Jack Iverson, Director, Canadian Studies Association at Whitman College with Eric Bridgeland, coach of the Whitman basketball team.

Fabbi provided a presentation to faculty, Challenges and Rewards of a Multidisciplinary Program: Canadian Studies at the University of Washington, as part of the Center for Teaching and Learning program. She gave an overview of the UW Canadian Studies Center faculty and activities and discussed the importance of Canadian studies in an increasingly integrated North American community. “While Canada and the U.S. have developed in parallel and have been close allies and partners, the values of the two nations are divergent and this trend is only increasing,” Fabbi pointed out,
“therefore, it is imperative that our students have some understanding of one another in order to ensure a vibrant North America in the future.”

Meetings were also held with individual faculty including Mary Anne O’Neil, Whitman professor of French and president of Northwest chapter of the American Association of Teachers of French (AATF). O’Neil and Fabbi are now working together to increase Canadian French language and cultural training to AATF.

Fabbi’s visit coincided with Whitman’s O’Donnell Visiting Educator, Magnus Isacsson. Isacsson is an award-winning Canadian documentary filmmaker who has produced more than a dozen independent films since 1986 (http://www.whitman.edu/content/global-studies/odonnell/current).

Members of Whitman College Canadian Studies Association
Members of the Whitman College Canadian Studies Association relax after a day of presentations and meetings. From left, Jack Iverson, Director, Canadian Studies Association; Mary Anne O’Neill, Professor, French; Nadine Fabbi, UW Canadian Studies Center; Magnus Isacsson, Canadian Independent Film Maker and Visiting Scholar; Sharon Alker, Professor, English; Dean Snider, Athletic Director.

As an outcome of the visit, plans were put in place for a Winter 2011 visit to Whitman from the UW Canada-US Fulbright Visiting Chair, Marcia Ostashewski. Ostashewski’s research involves the intersection between music and dance, and race and ethnicity in Canada. She will be in residence at the UW from January to June 2011.

The UW Canadian Studies Center is secretariat for the PNWCSC consisting of 47 universities and colleges in Alaska, the Yukon, Alberta, British Columbia, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, regional organizations, as well as the ministries of Government in British Columbia and Alberta.

The Consortium’s mission is to facilitate the development of Canadian Studies at institutions of higher education in the Pacific Northwest, and to enhance cooperation, joint programming, and information sharing among Canadian Studies programs and faculty in the Pacific region. Whitman College is one of the most active members of the Consortium. See http://www.pnwcsc.org/. Jack Iverson, host of the visit, was the successful recipient of a recent Program Enhancement Grant from the Government of Canada.

 

Return to Top

Return to Newsletter Front Page


 

 

Canadian Studies Center
University of Washington
Box 353650
Thomson Hall, Room 503
Seattle, WA 98195-3650
T (206) 221-6374
F (206) 685-0668
canada@uw.edu