University of Washington

December 2012 Report
 

Dear Colleagues,
Canadian Studies wishes you the happiest of holidays! Before we “break,” we are pleased to report on another vibrant month at the Center. The 13th Annual International Education Week – a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education – took place in November and education regarding Canada’s role in the world was certainly broadly disseminated. Most notably, Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University, our consortium partner, served as co-chair of the 92nd National Council for Social Studies Annual Conference. Tina oversaw a program that included over 30 presentations and professional development meetings that served over 700 participants! See below for several articles on the conference and more from our affiliated faculty, FLAS students and colleagues. – Nadine


Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
Canada, the United States & the Arctic Council – Preparing for the Age of the Arctic
by Sophie Hubbell and Adam Akerblom, Arctic Initiative Interns, Canadian Studies Center & UW Freshman

(Left to right) Arctic Initiative Interns Adam Akerblom and Sophie Hubbell, Arctic Consultant Terry Fenge, and Arctic Initiative task force students Zoë Cosford and Charlotte Dubiel.

On Tuesday, November 13, key Arctic consultant Terry Fenge visited the UW campus and led a provocative roundtable discussion on the Arctic Council. Terry Fenge is an Ottawa-based consultant specializing in aboriginal, Arctic and environmental issues. Born and raised in the UK, he has degrees from the universities of Wales, Victoria and Waterloo. He has been both Research Director and Executive Director of the Canadian Arctic Resources Committee and for eight years was Research Director and Senior Negotiator for the Inuit of Nunavut in negotiations with the Government of Canada that resulted in the 1993 Nunavut Land Claims Agreement and the establishment of the Territory of Nunavut. From 1996 to 2006 he was Strategic Counsel to Nobel Prize nominee Sheila Watt-Cloutier, then President of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference. He has authored or co-authored six books, including Northern Lights Against POPs: Combatting Toxic Threats in the Arctic, with David Downie of Columbia University, and more than 70 papers.

Canada assumes the chair of the eight-nation Arctic Council in 2013 for a two-year term to be followed by the United States in 2015. Mr. Fenge argues that cooperation between the United States and Canada has the potential to put a major stamp on the circumpolar world. The scope of this premiere and people-driven institution is expanding particularly in its environmental agenda. The conclusion of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) in 2004 made the Arctic our world’s climate change barometer. Persistent organic pollutants found in the blood of Inuit women gave rise to matters of health, culture and women’s issues in the Arctic Council. However Mr. Fenge argues that the indigenous people need an adequate spokesperson to gain much needed attention from civil servants. One of the main issues facing the circumpolar world is the interests other non-Arctic states now have in the region. These would-be observers in the Arctic Council include states like India, China, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore. In reviewing The Declaration on the Establishment of the Arctic Council, Mr. Fenge provocatively argues it is hopelessly outdated and is in desperate need of reform. Nonetheless, we have a council that is functioning well and we are seeing, Mr. Fenge argues, a significant increase in the effectiveness of the council as a high level forum. Ultimately, Mr. Fenge claims Canada and the U.S. need to push a “reset button” with the region. The age of the Arctic is almost upon us and it is in our interests to engage people.

Sophie Hubbell and Adam Akerblom are the Arctic Initiative Interns through the Canadian Studies Center. The Arctic Initiative includes expanding Arctic Studies at the UW.

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
UW Fulbright Visiting Chair in Innovation Addresses Local Business Leaders
by Yan Cimon, Ph.D., 2013 Fulbright Visiting Chair in Innovation

Yan Cimon, Canada's Fulbright Visiting Chair in Innovation (l'Université Laval) with Wes Kovarik, Law & International Studies, and graduate affiliate of Canadian Studies.

Yan Cimon, UW Fulbright Chair originally from Université Laval, provided a presentation on North American economic integration at the Consulate General of Canada in Seattle on 6 December 2012. The talk entitled, “America Bouncing Back: How Canada May be Key to a U.S. Economic Recovery” challenged conventional thinking that the U.S. would be better off if it implemented “buy American” provisions. Cimon argued that such a policy has likely cost the U.S. economy well over 175,000 jobs and has had a considerable, and negative, impact on the U.S. economy in general.

Cimon noted that while North American countries exports to one another were slowing down in recent years, the Canada-U.S. trade relationship remains very beneficial to the United States with the bulk of U.S. exports going to Canada. It is vital, therefore, that the United States do what it can to keep the Canada-U.S. relationship vibrant. Yet, the border has become more of an irritant than a facilitator of trade. In fact, the border may cost anywhere between three to 13% of our bilateral trade depending on the sectors examined and the methodology employed.

Cimon argued that competition between Canada and the United States also makes little sense when most products are built on both sides of the border and cross the border several times before they are complete. Firms are now part of global networks. Cimon urged that “our common discourse should move beyond “trade” and “value chains” to recognize that we operate in “sophisticated networks.”

Twenty members of the business community and the University of Washington enjoyed Cimon’s challenging insights into the North American economy.

Yan Cimon holds the Fulbright Visiting Chair in Innovation at the UW College of Engineering’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He is Associate Professor of Strategy at Université Laval’s Faculty of Business Administration (Québec City, Canada) and is the Deputy Director of CIRRELT (Québec) – the Interuniversity Research Center on Logistics, Transportation and Enterprise Networks.

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
Canada Border and Port Tour with the Canadian Consulate
by Anne Goodchild, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Between September 25 and 27, 2012, I joined a group of academics, industry representatives, and government officials on a tour of land border and marine port facilities in British Columbia. The tour was sponsored by the Canadian Government, and led by Kevin Cook of the Seattle Consulate. The signing of the Beyond the Border initiative by President Obama and Prime Minister Harper on February 4, 2011, defines a new era of Unites States-Canada cooperation, and much of the tour focused on the changes that will take place due to this new agreement. In addition, we observed substantial changes in Canadian Security initiatives since the establishment of the Canadian Border Services Agency in 2003.

I have conducted research on marine ports and land borders for the last 10 years, and have a particular interest in the commercial land border crossings at Pacific Highway, between the lower mainland of British Columbia, and Western Washington. My research group has looked at many questions here, including identifying the operational elements most responsible for delay, the performance of security programs, and the border’s impact on regional supply chains. The site visit provided me with a contemporary view of the operations both on the US and Canadian sides, and an opportunity to observe operations in this ever changing environment.

I am also an active researcher in the area of marine ports, in particular their connections to the landside transportation system, and their role in regional trade. In past research we’ve performed comparative analysis of the ports of Seattle, Tacoma, Vancouver, and Prince Rupert, and were some of the first to visit and study the new Port at Prince Rupert when the Fairview Container Terminal opened there in 2008. My recent visit allowed me to observe what role the port has come to play in global trade, and how operations are conducted.

The tour was a wonderful opportunity to refresh and revitalize my knowledge of Canadian West-Coast transportation infrastructure, and to consider the significance of their investments and programs on the Puget Sound. I was very fortunate to be accompanied by an outstanding group of American colleagues who I can now count as friends. Many thanks to the Canadian Government and the Seattle Consulate for their generosity!

Dr. Goodchild is the Allan and Inger Osberg Endowed Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington. She is also Director of the Goods Movement Collaborative and Academic Director of the Supply Chain Transportation and Logistics Degree Program. Her research interests lie in logistics and freight transportation with a particular enthusiasm for maritime transportation and port operations. In her research she has evaluated strategies to improve port efficiency, the relationships between goods movement operations and air quality, the effect of new technologies on freight transportation system productivity, and the impact of travel time variability on goods movement. She considers the multiple agents acting together that create the transportation system and the incentives for each of these actors. Her primary areas of study are containerized cargo, marine terminals, and international borders.

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
U.W. Faculty Travels to Portland to Talk about Media in Québec
by Natalie Debray, Communication

I was recently invited to participate in “The Faces of Quebec: Two Days of Music and Lectures,” co-sponsored by Canadian Studies and the Portland Center for Public Humanities at Portland State University (PSU). Always eager to share my passion for all things Quebec and all things media, I boarded an Amtrak train for the comfortable 3-hour ride and was pleasantly surprised to discover a dynamic Canadian Studies program in the heart of Portland.

My lecture, “Language, Media and Cultural Identity: A View from Quebec,” was held on the first day of the conference (November 15) at the ethereal Native American Student and Community Center near the epicenter of PSU’s urban campus. Flanked by floor to ceiling windows and a fine collection of Native American art, it was easy to find inspiration – and a captive audience. In the talk I provided an historical overview of the province in the context of Canadian history but also focused on issues salient to Quebec identity: notably language preservation and nation building, particularly the role the media play in both.

We packed a lot of information into 90 minutes and I would have loved to continue the conversation. One after another, members of the audience, a mixture of PSU students (including Assistant Professor Annabelle Dolidon’s French class), faculty, and members of the community at large, maintained the interactive tone of the presentation posing thoughtful and compelling questions ranging from the status of the sovereignty movement to the economic impact of Quebec’s strict language laws. It was exhilarating to be part of such an enthusiastic discussion.

Natalie Debray is a Lecturer with the Department of Communication at the University of Washington where she is currently teaching, COM 321/POLS 330 Communication and International Relations, including considerable content on media in Québec. Natalie is an affiliated faculty of the Center. She was a Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellow (French) in summers 2001 and 2001 and the 2001-02 academic year.

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
UW Faculty Serves at the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States Board Meeting

Members of the executive board of ACSUS. From the left: Sarah-Beth Keogh, Ken Holland, Neal Carter, Myrna Delson-Karan, Jean-Jacques Thomas, and David Archibald.

Morna McEachern, Social Work, is currently serving as secretary of the executive board of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States (ACSUS). ACSUS held its annual meeting in Tampa, Florida over Veteran’s Day (Remembrance Day) weekend. To meet the challenges to funding cuts, ACSUS has reached out and connected with Canadian Studies organizations in several countries: Mexico, Argentina, Sweden, Japan, Israel, Canada. Most significant is the connection with Mexican and Canadian Associations. Both will be academic sponsors of the biennial meeting in Tampa in the fall of 2013. The theme of the conference will be “Canada in the Hemisphere” and will also include a focus on the 20th anniversary of the North American Free Trade Agreement.
ACSUS is also looking for a new home for the head office at a university or other organization and will be sending out a request for proposals in the new year.

Morna McEachern, Social Work, and Program Manager for Pacific Northwest Canadian Studies Consortium (PNWCSC), joined the board of directors of the Association of Canadian Studies in the United States (ACSUS) and serves as its secretary. The Canadian Studies Center is an institutional member of ACSUS.

For more information on ACSUS, click here

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
FLAS Fellow in Inuktitut (2005-2008) Edits New Book in Canadian Studies

Beyond the Border: Tensions across the Forty-ninth Parallel in the Great Plains and the Prairies is edited by Kyle Conway and Timothy Pasch. It is an interdisciplinary look at a neglected region of the Canada-US border. The idea that the American Great Plains and the Canadian Prairies are just "fly-over" country is a mistake. In the post-9/11 era, politicians and policy-makers are paying more attention to the region, especially where border enforcement is concerned. Beyond the Border provides interdisciplinary perspectives on the region's increasing importance.

Drawing inspiration from Habermas's observation that certain modern phenomena - from ecological degradation and organized crime to increased capital mobility - challenge a state's ability to retain sovereignty over a fixed geographical region, contributors to this book question the ontological status of the Canada-US border. They look at how entertainment media represents the border for their viewers, how Canada and the US enforce the line that separates the two countries, and how the border appears from the viewpoint of Native communities where it was imposed through their traditional lands. Under this scrutiny, the border ceases to appear as self-evident, its status more fragile than otherwise imagined.

At a time when the importance of border security is increasingly stressed and the Great Plains and Prairies are becoming more economically and politically prominent, Beyond the Border offers necessary context for understanding decisions by politicians and policy-makers along the forty-ninth parallel.

Contributors include Phil Bellfy (Michigan State University), Christopher Cwynar (University of Wisconsin), Brandon Dimmel (Western University), Zalfa Feghali (University of Nottingham), Joshua Miner (University of Iowa), Paul Moore (Ryerson University), Michelle Morris (University of Waterloo), Paul Sando (Minnesota State University Moorhead), and Serra Tinic (University of Alberta).

Kyle Conway is assistant professor of communication at the University of North Dakota and the author of Everyone Says No: Public Service Broadcasting and the Failure of Translation. 

Timothy Pasch is assistant professor of communication at the University of North Dakota. The title of Timothy's dissertation is, "Inuktitut Online in Nunavik: Mixed Methods Web-Based Strategies for the Preservation of Aboriginal and Minority Languages." Tim is in his fourth year of Inuktitut and has been awarded a FLAS fellowship for the Inuit language each year since 2005. He graduated with his PhD. in Communications in 2008. 

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
FLAS Announcement at NAFSA 

The director of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS), Resat Kasaba, and Foreign Language and Area Studies Coordinator, Robyn Davis, presented on JSIS' eight Title VI National Resource Centers and the Foreign Language and Area Studies program at the annual National Association of Foreign Student Advisers (NAFSA) conference. Robyn discussed the tremendous success of the FLAS program. In 2012-13, 122 UW students were awarded FLAS fellowships in a total of 41 foreign languages. The Canadian Studies Center awarded FLAS Fellowships in French, Tlingit and Anishinaabemowin – the first National Resource Center in the nation to award FLAS Fellowships in First Nations’ languages. Cheryl Gibbs and Timothy Duvall , from the U.S. Department of Education, also presented on the panel. The conference was held in Tacoma in early November.

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
Welcome New FLAS Fellow from the Law School!
by Kevin Kirkpatrick, JD, School of Law, FLAS 2012-13

As a Puget Sound area native who grew up only a few hours from the border—and someone whose great-grandparents immigrated originally to Vancouver, B.C. from Europe—Canada has long intrigued me. I even took a vacation a few years ago to do a brief home stay in a francophone household in Montréal. When I heard about the FLAS program, applying for a fellowship through the Jackson School’s Canadian Studies Center seemed a great way to combine my interest in international natural resources, finance, and tax with study of a country that has captured my interest. I’m currently on the staff of the law school’s Washington Journal of Environmental Law & Policy and am writing an article for that publication on how changes in the North American utilities industry may affect new agreements between the U.S. and Canada. More specifically, I’m curious about how deregulation of electricity markets by state and provincial governments starting in the 1980s and the implementation of NAFTA in the 1990s may play a role in determining new terms of the Columbia River Treaty in 2014. The FLAS has provided a really exciting opportunity to both study more French and gain a deeper understanding of Canadian federalism.

Funding for FLAS Fellowships is provided by a Center allocation from International and Foreign Language Education, U.S. Department of Education. Visit our FLAS page: http://jsis.washington.edu/canada/flas/.

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
NCSS Opens Windows on the World -- and especially Canada – at its Annual Conference in Seattle
by Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist, Center for Canadian-American Studies at Western Washington University

From left to right: Brenda Ball (B.C.S.S.T.A. Board Member and Social Studies Chair at Crofton House School – Vancouver, BC); Joy Kogawa (renowned author of the award-winning novel Obasan); and Tina Storer (Conference Co-Chair and WWU Center for Canadian-American Studies’ Education and Curriculum Specialist) at Kogawa’s “Conversation with an Author” session.

The 92nd Annual National Council for the Social Studies Conference in Seattle last month was simply an outstanding professional development opportunity for the 3500 plus educators who attended the more than 400 sessions, poster presentations, clinics and workshops that were offered. It was my honor to be selected by NCSS leaders two years ago as a co-chair to ensure participation by Canadians in the region and inclusion of content connected to Canada in the conference program.

Although our NRC has worked with NCSS before to increase the profile for Canada among social studies educators, no conference has provided so many opportunities! Almost 700 educators at the conference gained new knowledge about Canada directly through professional development sessions and meetings. Indeed, almost everyone was impacted by the effort when attendance at all thirty-four Canada-related events is considered (including a shared NRCs on Canada exhibit and receptions/scholarships supported by Canadian sponsors). All told, there were 27 Canadians, 3 Canadians who reside in the US, and 8 Americans who presented on Canada at NCSS 2012. It was wonderful learning from them all and to meet so many others from across Canada!

To advocate for greater inclusion of Canada in U.S. classrooms, the two NRCs collaboratively presented “Canada and the American Curriculum: A National Approach to Canadian Studies” to the Council of State Social Studies Specialists (CS4). This presentation stands out from the rest because it holds great potential impact for curricular reform since state leaders nationwide are currently determining next steps for the revision and/or adoption of Common Core Standards and the soon-to-be-released C3 Frameworks for the Social Studies.

Current NCSS President, John Moore, welcoming the 3500+ social studies educators in attendance to the conference in Seattle.

Some of the other Canada-focused sessions are featured elsewhere in this newsletter but I would like to express my gratitude now to Nadine Fabbi for coordinating a pre-conference clinic focused on the Arctic as well to Betsy Arntzen and Amy Sotherden, our colleagues at the Northeast NRC on Canada, as well as members of the NCSS Canada Community, like Ruth Writer, who personally and professionally supported the initiative. Several Canadian colleagues like Brenda Ball (Crofton House School –Vancouver, BC), Adam Woelders (Trinity Western University – Langley, BC), and Mike Perry-Whittingham (McMath Secondary School – Richmond, BC) worked diligently on the northern side of the border to support the effort as well!

Most importantly, I must acknowledge and thank two local teacher associates who performed outreach on my behalf at the NRCs on Canada exhibit booth when my own duties called me elsewhere. Carol Gnojewski and Kindra Kilgore, both teachers in Monroe, WA, hosted the exhibite and performed outreach by sharing K-12 STUDY CANADA resources with all who stopped by to learn more about Canada. They helped to recruit more than 350 educators as new members of the “Canada Listserv” who will receive emails from me every second month with tips and ideas for teaching about Canada. The new contacts represent 43 U.S. states, Puerto Rico, 4 provinces in Canada, and 6 other countries (China, Hong Kong, Hungary, Korea, Singapore, UK). These figures show just how effective the conference theme, “Opening Windows on the World”, was for Canadian Studies!

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
Who Owns the Arctic? Pre-NCSS Clinic

Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada/Institute on Québec Studies, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh presents on her 10-day visit to Nunavik, Canada in 2009.

As part of the 92nd National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference, “Windows to the World,” a pre-conference clinic on the Arctic was provided to educators. “This is an area that few students know anything about yet is vitally important to the future of not only our country, but to the world,” said one participant. “By studying this topic, students can be involved with geography international relations, economics, and government.”

The Arctic is receiving increased attention as a result of climate change, natural resource exploitation, and sovereignty issues. The region has become one of the most dynamic international regions in the world argued by some to be the new center of world politics. Eight Arctic nation-states claim rights to the Arctic including Canada, the United States, Russia, Finland, Denmark (Greenland), Sweden, Norway, and Iceland. In addition, many non-Arctic nation-states are seeking entry into the Arctic Council. In 2013 Singapore, India, China, South Korea and possibly the European Union will submit applications to join the Arctic Council. In addition, six Arctic indigenous organizations have status as Permanent Participants on the Arctic Council marking the first time in history indigenous peoples and national states are working together to make decisions that will impact the circumpolar world and beyond. Governance over the region is complex and dynamic.

On Thursday, November 15th, sixteen educators representing eight states attended the clinic, “Who Owns the Arctic?” held in the Maple Leaf Room of the Consulate General of Canada, Seattle. Educators who attended the session gained an understanding of global change in the Arctic, Inuit contemporary views relating to identity and interdependence, self-determination, population dynamics, language, modernization, cultural transition, social problems, and environmental matters.

One participant noted, “Who Owns the Arctic?” is an important workshop that helped me think about the geopolitical effects on countries in relation to the problems and issues of the Arctic that many educators are totally unaware of … this workshop was critical in helping me understand the indigenous issues related to the Arctic.”

Nadine Fabbi, U.W. Canadian Studies Center offered an overview of the geopolitics and territorial claims in the region. Amy Sotherden, Center for the Study of Canada/Institute on Québec Studies, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and Betsy Arntzen, Canadian-American Center, University of Maine discussed their recent trip to the Canadian Arctic. Tina Storer, Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University, provided a presentation and packet of educational resources on the region.

This event was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers on Canada including the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS), University of Washington and the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University), the Northeast National Resource Centers on Canada (Center for the Study of Canada, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and the Canadian-American Center, University of Maine); the eight U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers in JSIS (including Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center); the East Asia Resource Center, JSIS; the Consul General of Canada, Seattle; and, the Government of Québec.

Program

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
Inuit Political Leadership in Canada & the World Today

Sixteen educators, representing eight states, attended the pre-NCSS clinic, "Who Owns the Arctic?" held at the Consulate General of Canada, Seattle.

As part of the 92nd Annual National Council for Social Studies Conference, “Windows to the World,” held in Seattle, November 16-18, Nadine Fabbi, Canadian Studies Center, offered a presentation on the effective involvement of the Inuit in domestic and international affairs and how that involvement is altering how we understanding international relations. The presentation covered some of the recent activities of the Inuit Circumpolar Council representing the Inuit in Russia, Greenland, Canada and the United States, and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Inuit association in Canada.

The presentation had ten participants each with a strong interest in international affairs. The participants gained an understanding of how global interdependence is shaping political institutions in the Arctic. The Arctic is an ideal lens via which to understand the broader issues of indigenous involvement in international affairs, social justice and environmental sustainability.

One participant noted that it was critical students understand what is occurring in the Arctic in order that they become more civically engaged particularly understanding the “cooperation among nations and indigenous peoples.”

This event was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers on Canada including the Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada (Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS), University of Washington and the Center for Canadian-American Studies, Western Washington University), the Northeast National Resource Centers on Canada (Center for the Study of Canada, State University of New York College at Plattsburgh and the Canadian-American Center, University of Maine); the eight U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Centers in JSIS (including Canadian Studies Center, Center for Global Studies, Center for West European Studies, East Asia Center, Ellison Center for Russian, East European and Central Asian Studies, Middle East Center, South Asia Center, and Southeast Asia Center); and, the East Asia Resource Center, JSIS.

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Canadian Studies Center, December Report, 2012
International Assembly & College and University Faculty Association Welcome Reception

Tamara Leonard (right), Associate Director the Global Studies Center in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies with Wendy Sue Fitzhenry, Trinity Lutheran School, and one of this year’s JSIS First-Timer Fellows.

Associated groups meet annually in conjunction with the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) conference and two important organizations are the International Assembly (IA) and the College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA). IA provides a forum for communication, collaboration, and interchange of ideas among NCSS members from the United States and foreign countries while CUFA consists of higher education faculty members, graduate students, and others interested in working with social educators such as social scientists, historians, and philosophers. Each year the two groups hold a reception welcoming their members to the conference.

This year, because IA and CUFA opened its doors to all international visitors at the NCSS conference, the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies served as a co-sponsor of the event along with the Alberta Ministry of International and Intergovernmental Relations. Over 300 conference participants attended the reception on Thursday, November 15th at the Sheraton Hotel. Tamara Leonard, Associate Director, Global Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, provided welcoming remarks at the reception and spoke briefly about the role of the Jackson School in promoting international education at NCSS. Tina Storer, Education and Curriculum Specialist at WWU’s Center for Canadian-American Studies, similarly spoke on behalf of the Government of Alberta to welcome international visitors from around the world to the conference, especially the many Canadians in attendance.

NCSS is the world's largest professional development conference including over 500 content-rich sessions. This year’s conference was held in Seattle, Washington entitled, “Opening Windows to the World.” Founded in 1921, NCSS engages and supports educators in strengthening and advocating social studies. With members in all the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and 69 foreign countries, NCSS serves as an umbrella organization for elementary, secondary, and college teachers of history, geography, economics, political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, and law-related education. Sponsors include Alberta Ministry of International and Intergovernmental Affairs, Canadian Studies Center, and Global Studies Center. 

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PHOTO ALBUM

Anne Goodchild joins a group of academics, industry representatives, and government officials on a tour of land border and marine port facilities in British Columbia (11/12).



Jeff Taylor, teacher at Cleveland High School in Seattle, is one of the recipients  of the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS) First-Timer Scholarship (11/12).




Natalie Debray, speaks at Portland State University; her lecture titled, "Language, Media and Cultural Identity: A View From Quebec" (11/12).

 

 

 

Canadian Studies Center
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