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The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

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Jackson School Calendar of Events

For more events you can view each center or program's events page or go to the archive and advanced search link above. You can subscribe to our events mailing list here:
http://mailman13.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/jsis-uw

This Week

Click on the title for more details.

All Events

October 2014

Careers Info Session: Department of State

Academic Services Office

Alumni Relations

Career Services

Joint Outreach

Thursday October 30, 2014
5:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Ambassador Lewis Lukens

JSIS Careers & Professional Development

jsisjobs@uw.edu

JSIS welcomes our brand new Diplomat in Residence Lewis Lukens to Thomson Hall. Lewis has been recently installed as the Diplomat in Residence for the Northwest, and will be leading an info session on how to follow a career in diplomacy with the US Department of State - this workshop is open to all Jackson School students and alumni.


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Civilian Side Choosing in Insurgency

Center for Global Studies

Friday October 31, 2014
12:00 -1:20 PM
Gowen 1A (Olson Room)

Emily Gade, Political Science Ph.D.student (presenter) with Will Gochberg Ph.D. student (discussant)

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment, Richard B. Wesley Graduate Student Fund for International Relations, Center for Global Studies, and Dep't of Political Science

tleonard@uw.edu


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An Enterprise with Two Purposes: Measurement of Longitude in 17th and 18th Century China

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Friday October 31, 2014
12:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Sun Xiaochun, Institute for the History of Natural Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences

cgreed@uw.edu

By the end of the Ming dynasty (1368-1644), the Jesuit missionaries introduced the concept of geographical longitude to China. The longitudinal measurement was important to the Chinese in two respects: astronomically and geographically. The Chinese astronomers were obliged to predict ominous celestial phenomena such as solar and lunar eclipses. The measurement of longitude was necessary for predicting the exact moment of an eclipse in different places, especially for provincial capitals. Also it was realized that accurate measurement of longitude and latitude were essential for map making. From 1708 to 1707, the Kangxi Emperor commissioned Jesuit missionaries to survey the empire. The result was the unprecedented work entitled "The Complete Atlas the Qing Empire." In this talk the speaker will investigate the methods used for measuring the longitude, and the accuracy of this data. He will also point out that the geodesic survey was not only a Chinese undertaking of calendar-making and the geodesic survey of the Qing Empire, but also a part of a global endeavor for the measurement of the meridian and for the controversy over the shape of earth.

Sun Xiaochun is Professor of the History of Science at the Institute for the History of Natural Science at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He studied astronomy in Nanjing University. He received his Ph.D. in History of Astronomy from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1993 and his second Ph.D. in History and Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007. He has published primarily on the history of Chinese astronomy and co-authored "The Chinese Sky During the Han: Constellating Stars and Society" (1997). Currently he serves as Vice-President of Commission 41 on History of Astronomy of International Astronomical Union, and a corresponding member of International Academy of the History of Science.

 


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November 2014

Conversations on Law, Revolution, and Islam: A Workshop Honoring Ellis Goldberg on the Occasion of His Retirement

Middle East Center

Saturday November 1, 2014
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
UW Tower, 22d Floor, Boardroom (Husky Card or sign-in required)

Mona El-Ghobashy, Independent Scholar; Iza Hussin, Cambridge University; Arang Keshavarzian, New York University; Tamir Moustafa, Simon Fraser University; Leonard Wood, Independent Scholar; Malika Zeghal, Harvard University

Department of Political Science, Middle East Center, and Jackson School of International Studies

mecuw@uw.edu

This workshop will be divided into two sessions. The morning session will focus on the distinctly different concepts of democratic transition and revolutionary upheaval to understand the events of the last five years in Iran and the Arab countries. The afternoon session will focus on the claims diverse scholars have made about the ways in which sharia and modern law go in different directions and in which the idea of “Islamic law” is at best a modern calque and perhaps a wholly new creation.


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Dia de Muertos: A Mexican Celebration to Remember Our Departed

Latin American Studies

Saturday November 1, 2014 to Sunday November 2, 2014
12-7pm (Saturday) / 12-6pm (Sunday)
Armory/Center House - Seattle Center

Dia de los Muertos Committee

festivaldiademuertos@gmail.com

Seattle Center Festál presents Dia de Muertos - A Mexican Celebration to Remember Our Departed, Nov. 1 and 2. Explore and experience the cultural roots of Mexico through live performances, spectacular community altar and cemetery, special hands-on activities, foods, face painting and exquisite rituals. Create sugar skulls and paper skeletons, explore community altars and march in a musical procession to remember the dead. The art and spirituality of Mexican culture is celebrated at Dia de Muertos. This “Day of the Dead” festival honors the lives of loved ones who have passed.

 


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The Art of the Indo-Persian Album

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Sunday November 2, 2014
4:00 PM
Seattle Asian Art Museum, Volunteer Park

Keelan Overton, Associate Curator of Islamic Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Seattle Art Museum, The Gardner Center for Art and Ideas

http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/calendar/events?EventId=29302

 Early modern period Indo-Persian albums of painting and calligraphy included important portraits of rulers. These portraits circulated between India and Iran, often with encoded messages that provide insight into the political and cultural realities of the day.

Keelan Overton, Associate Curator of Islamic Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Held in connection with the current installation at the Asian Art Museum, Mughal Painting: Power and Piety.

Tickets: $10; SAM members $5 www.visitsam.org/tickets


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Arctic Caucus - Yukon, Northwest Territories & Alaska

Canadian Studies Center

Monday November 3, 2014
3:30-4:20pm
134 Thomson Hall

Canadian Studies Center

canada@uw.edu

The partnership aims to provide a forum to share information, discuss issues of mutual concern, identify areas for collaboration between the three jurisdictions and the rest of North America, and provide Arctic-relevant input to PNWER working groups and the region at-large. Matt Morrison, Executive Director of PNWER, will discuss the role of the Caucus.

The Arctic Caucus of the Pacific NorthWest Economic Region (PNWER) is a partnership between Alaska, the Yukon, and the Northwest Territories.

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"Impact of Tax and Expenditure Limits (TELs) on Local Government Debt Burdens"

Jackson School Information

Monday November 3, 2014
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
The Parrington Hall Forum

Sharon Kioko

ekwein@uw.edu or 206.685.8983

Evans School Research Seminar Series
"Impact of Tax and Expenditure Limits (TELs) on Local Government Debt Burdens"

Sharon Kioko
Associate Professor
Maxwell School of Public Administration and International Affairs, Syracuse University

Monday, November 03, 2014
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Parrington Hall Forum

This event is open to:
Students, Faculty, Staff
This event has been categorized as:
Lectures and Presentations
For further information please contact:
Ellen Weinstein
ekwein@uw.edu
206.685.8983


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Children's Well-being in Contemporary China: Poverty and Inequality in the Children's Well-Being Survey 2014

East Asia Center

Monday November 3, 2014
12:30 p.m.
Parrington Hall 305

Wen-Jui Han, New York University and NYC-ECNU Institute for Social Development at NYU Shanghai

cgreed@uw.edu


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Biodiversity of Arctic Ocean Fauna as Related to Indigenous Populations and Climate Change

Canadian Studies Center

Wednesday November 5, 2014
3:30pm
223 Anderson Hall

Vincent Gallucci, Chair of Canadian Studies and Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

Canadian Studies Center, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences

canada@uw.edu

Vincent Gallucci, Chair of Canadian Studies and Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences will present on the research conducted under an Arctic Council subcommittee grant to synthesize current knowledge on Arctic marine ecosystems and provide an overview of already observed and predicted changes in the rapidly changing Arctic climate. The Arctic indigenous Inuit people traditionally live on the tundra and live off of the bounty of the sea. But, change is occurring on the tundra too, leading to slow, but real shifts in terrestrial ecosystems as well.
 


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KARAMANLIDES Memories

Hellenic Studies

Wednesday November 5, 2014
12:30-1:30 PM
Thomson Hall, room 317

Selenay Aytac

Hellenic Studies The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization The University of Washington Libraries Digital Initiatives Program

Prof. Walter Andrews walter@uw.edu

 The Karamanlidika Virtual Library is a project intended to provide digital access to
the memories of the Karamanlides people, Greek Orthodox Christians who lived in
Central Anatolia during the Ottoman period. They spoke Ottoman Turkish, with a
smattering of Greek loan words, but wrote Turkish in Greek characters and identified
with Greece during the rise of nationalism in the 19th century.

Initial work has shown that Karamanlides memories and
cultural data are scattered about the World Wide Web.
Prof. Aytaç’s proposed “library” will employ digital
library technologies to unite these dispersed artifacts in a
virtual platform.

Click for Flyer


Of special interest to Linguistics, Hellenic and Modern
Greek studies, Turkish and Ottoman studies, Digital
Humanities, Library Science.


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Domination, Integration, and Betrayal

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 5, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Raymond Jonas

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

  

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.


In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.


Part 1: Domination, Integration, and Betrayal
The Great War signaled the terminal crisis of the European old regime–a crisis more than a century in the making. Pursuing the story of this crisis across themes of domination, integration, and betrayal, Professor Jonas will consider the rivalries that underpinned the war and the bleak geopolitical thinking that informed them. Jonas will explore the political culture that obliterated tolerance for difference, finding the foundations of power in nation and race. Finally, he will ask us to ponder the responsibilities of the powerful, viewed with the eyes of the young men they had persuaded to fight.

Raymond Jonas is a Professor of History at the University of Washington. His most recent book is The Battle of Adwa: African Victory in the Age of Empire. He is currently working on European expansion into postindependence Latin America.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


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Careers Info Session: Working for Think Tanks

Academic Services Office

Alumni Relations

Career Services

Joint Outreach

Thursday November 6, 2014
4:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Kailani Cordell, NBR Director of Human Resources

JSIS Careers & Professional Development

jsisjobs@uw.edu

Ever wonder what exactly a think tank does, or how research on international affairs affects the real world? Kailani Cordell, Director of Operations and Human Resources for the National Bureau of Asian Research, will lead a careers info session to address just that. Additionally, Kailani will be talking about careers and internship opportunities, and will be available to answer questions on what a career with an organization like NBR would involve.


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Careers Info Session: All About Teaching English Overseas

Academic Services Office

Alumni Relations

Career Services

Thursday November 6, 2014
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Rhea Connors, Bernice Ege-Zavala

JSIS Careers & Professional Development

jsisjobs@uw.edu

If your studies have you thinking about traveling overseas or exploring another part of the world, one great way to do that while supporting yourself is teaching. S-TESL (School of Teaching ESL) representatives will be coming to the Jackson School to answer questions on teaching English overseas and talk about certification programs that will help you to get that job.
 


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Keynote speaker Henri Barkey: "Kurdistan, the Changing Middle East, and U.S. Foreign Policy"

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

Middle East Center

Thursday November 6, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane Hall 120

Henri Barkey, Bernard L. and Bertha F. Cohen Professor at Lehigh University

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

jsis@uw.edu

Middle East expert Henri Barkey will give a presentation on "Kurdistan, the Changing Middle East, and U.S. Foreign Policy." The event will highlight a day of discussions about "Kurdistan and the Changing Middle East,” sponsored by the UW Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.

This event is free and open to the public. Participants are invited to attend all or part of the day’s discussions, which begin at 9 a.m. in the Peterson Room (5th floor) of Allen Library.

About Henri Barkey

Henri BarkeyBarkey served as a member of the U.S. State Department Policy Planning Staff, working primarily on issues related to the Middle East, the Eastern Mediterranean, and intelligence from 1998 to 2000. He is now the Bernard L. and Bertha F. Cohen Professor at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania.

His editorials have appeared in Newsweek, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Daily Star, and Los Angeles Times, and he is a frequent guest on the Newshour with Jim Lehrer and NPR. His most recent editorial appeared in The American Interest on Oct. 18 regarding the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani.

Barkey has written seven books, including Iraq, Its Neighbors and the United States, co-edited with Phebe Marr and Scott Lasensky; Preventing Conflict over Kurdistan; Turkey’s Kurdish Question with Graham Fuller; and European Responses to Globalization: Resistance, Adaptation and Alternatives.

Complete Program of Events: 

jsis.washington.edu/jackson/news/kurdistan2014.shtml

The Middle East Center’s sponsorship of an event does not imply that the Center endorses the content of the event.


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My Teacher, Watanabe Sadao

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Thursday November 6, 2014
4:00-5:00 PM
Allen Auditorium, Allen Library

Anne H.H. Pyle

Sponsored by the UW Libraries

For more information contact azusat@uw.edu

Anne Pyle will talk about her experience, the printing method and memories of her teacher, Watanabe Sadao.


Anne H.H. Pyle is a graduate of Skidmore College and has a master's degree in art education from Columbia University. She studied oil painting at the Fontainebleau School of Fine Arts and with Hobsen Pittman of the Philadelphia Academy. In Japan she studied printmaking with two of Japan's leading print artists, Yoshida Toshi and Watanabe Sadao. She was Watanabe's only private student and presently owns one of the largest collections of his work. She has written extensively and lectured to various church and university groups on his life and art.


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Conference: "Kurdistan and the Changing Middle East" w/ keynote by Middle East expert Henri Barkey

Center for Global Studies

Jackson School Information

Middle East Center

Thursday November 6, 2014
8:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
University of Washington, Allen Library, Petersen Room (5th floor)

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

jsis@uw.edu

The Jackson School invites you to attend all or part of the conference, "Kurdistan and the Changing Middle East." Events begin at 9 a.m. in the Petersen Room (5th floor) of Allen Library.

Middle East expert Henri Barkey will give the keynote presentation at 7 p.m. in Kane Hall 120.

This event is free and open to the public.

About Henri Barkey

Barkey served as a member of the U.S. State Department Policy Planning Staff, working primarily on issues related to the Middle East, the Eastern Mediterranean, and intelligence from 1998 to 2000. He is now the Bernard L. and Bertha F. Cohen Professor at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania.

His editorials have appeared in Newsweek, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Daily Star, and Los Angeles Times, and he is a frequent guest on the Newshour with Jim Lehrer and NPR. His most recent editorial appeared in The American Interest on Oct. 18 regarding the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani.

Barkey has written seven books, including Iraq, Its Neighbors and the United States, co-edited with Phebe Marr and Scott Lasensky; Preventing Conflict over Kurdistan; Turkey’s Kurdish Question with Graham Fuller; and European Responses to Globalization: Resistance, Adaptation and Alternatives.

Conference Program

Coffee: 8:30-9:00

9:00-9:15
Intro Remarks
Speakers: Reşat Kasaba, Nicole Watts

9:15-10:30 Panel I
State-Society Relations in northern Iraq
Speakers: Arbella Bet-Shlimon, Melisande Genat, Nicole Watts
Moderator: Reşat Kasaba

10:30-10:45 a.m. Coffee Break

10:45-12:00 a.m. Panel II
Dynamics of the Kurdish movement and governance in Turkey
Speakers: Güneş Murat Tezcur, Jessie Clark, Fırat Bozcalı
Moderator: Nicole Watts

12:00-1:30 Break (Lunch)

1:30-3:00 p.m. Panel III
Regional Dynamics
Speakers: Serhun Al, Henri Barkey, Aliza Marcus
Moderator: Reşat Kasaba

3:00-3:15 Break

3:15-4:30 Roundtable discussion on Current Events (All)
Moderator: Nicole Watts

5-6:30 p.m. Dinner (Requires RSVP in advance.)

7 p.m. Keynote address: Henri Barkey: Kurdistan, Changing Middle East, and U.S. Foreign Policy (Location: Kane 120)

List of confirmed participants in alphabetical order

Serhun Al, lecturer and PhD Candidate, Dept of Political Science, Univ. of Utah
Subject: Regional dynamics: hyphenated identities in Turkey and beyond

Henri Barkey, Prof., Dept of Int. Relations, Lehigh Univ.
Subject: Regional dynamics

Arbella Bet-Shlimon- Asst Prof, Dept of History, Univ of Wash.
Subject: State-Society Relations in northern Iraq: the case of Mosul

Fırat Bozcalı- PhD Candidate, Dept of Anthropology, Stanford Univ.
Dynamics of the Kurdish movement & governance in Turkey: Smugglers and lawyers in the Kurdish borderlands

Jessie Clark- Assistant Prof, Dept of Geography University of Nevada-Reno
Subject: Dynamics of the Kurdish movement and governance in Turkey: Gender and political geography in Diyarbakir

Melisande Genat- PhD student, Dept of History, Stanford Univ.
Subject: State-Society Relations in northern Iraq: political economy and prospects for independence

Aliza Marcus –Author and journalist, Bloomberg News
Subject: Regional dynamics: Dynamics of the Kurdish movement in Turkey and beyond

Güneş Murat Tezcur- Associate Prof, Dept of Political Science, Loyola University, Chicago
Subject: Dynamics of the Kurdish movement& governance in Turkey : the PKK, politicians and PKK militants

Nicole Watts- Professor, Dept of Political Science, San Francisco State University
Subject: State-Society Relations in Northern Iraq: governance and opposition under the KRG

The Middle East Center’s sponsorship of an event does not imply that the Center endorses the content of the event.


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Anything is Possible: How to Overcome Obstacles and Make a Difference

Center for West European Studies

European Union Center of Excellence

Hellenic Studies

Comparative Religion

Thursday November 6, 2014
6:30 PM
Kane Hall, room 130

Senator Olympia Snowe (R-Maine 1995-2013)

UW Graduate School UW Alumni Association Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies Department of Political Science and Department of Communications

Yvette Moy, yvettef@uw.edu

You do not need to be an alum of the University of Washington to attend or register. Open to the public, tickets are available beginning on 9/23.

Olympia Snowe's dedicated work in the U.S. Senate has garnered her nationwide recognition as a leading policymaker in Washington. In 2005, she was named the 54th most powerful woman in the world by Forbes magazine. In 2006, Time magazine named her one of the top ten U.S. Senators. Calling her "The Caretaker," it wrote of Snowe: "Because of her centrist views and eagerness to get beyond partisan point scoring, Maine Republican Olympia Snowe is in the center of every policy debate in Washington, but while Snowe is a major player on national issues, she is also known as one of the most effective advocates for her constituents." With her election in 1994, Senator Snowe became only the second woman Senator in history to represent Maine, following the late Sen. Margaret Chase Smith, who served from 1949 - 1973. In November 2006, she was re-elected to a third six-year term in the United States Senate with 74 percent of the vote.


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Southeast Asia Center Annual Fall Reception

Southeast Asia Center

Friday November 7, 2014
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Petersen Room of the Allen Library

Southeast Asia Center

saravf@uw.edu

We hope you can join us to celebrate at our annual fall reception, November 7, from 3-5pm in the Petersen Room of the Allen Library. Drinks, coffee, sweets and appetizers will be served.


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SEASON OF SACRIFICE

South Asia Center

Friday November 7, 2014
1:30 pm
Wallingford Community Center 4649 Sunnyside Ave N, #140, Seattle WA

Bharti Kirchner

Wallingford Community Center

206-461-7825

 Seattle Author Bharti Kirchner, winner of a recent 4Culture literature grant, reads from her novel-in-progress titled, Season of Sacrifice


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The Rise of Explication in the Mathematics of Late Imperial China

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Friday November 7, 2014
12:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Jeff Chen, Associate Professor of Mathematics, St. Could State University

cgreed@uw.edu

In the textual tradition of Chinese mathematics, reasoning or explanation did not figured prominently with few exceptions. This long-held practice of not including explanations in mathematical works was especially prevalent in treatises composed during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644). This began to change however in the first part of the 17thcollaborators embarked on various projects to translate European scientific into Chinese. By the end of the 17th or steps in computational algorithms became a fixture in the main text of most treatises. In this presentation, the comparison will be made of mathematical works in three categories: Ming treatises composed before the arrival of the Jesuits, geometric texts that attempt to make translated works more accessible, and those on traditional subjects with ample explanation in the main texts. The focus of the analysis is on the arrangement of various types of content material
in the main texts in the treatises. Based on our preliminary investigation, our thesis is that the introduction of European mathematics into China served as a catalyst to inspire the emergence in the main texts of explanations, which previously took place in oral exchanges between masters and disciples or in the correspondence between friends. Moreover, the presence of explanations in the text, resembling the commentary and annotations in classical studies, elevated the status of mathematics from a collection of problems and solutions similar to a practitioner’s manual to legitimate intellectual study. We will also examine what explanation in mathematics meant to scholars in the 17th century when the Jesuits and their Chinese century, explanations of underlying principles century.


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Natural and Unnatural Disasters: 3/11, Asbestos, and the Unmaking of Japan’s Modern World

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday November 7, 2014
3:30 - 5:00 PM
Savery Hall Room 166

Brett Walker, Montana State University

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

The massive earthquake of 2011 unleashed a tsunami that swept away entire communities. Along with an enduring nuclear legacy, it also left an estimated 25 millions tons of rubble, much of it contaminated with asbestos and other carcinogenic toxins. Indeed, the unnatural disaster of cleaning up Japan’s pulverized and aerosolized built environment remained. This talk investigates asbestos in the construction and, more importantly, destruction of Japan’s built environment, with a focus on the impact of the 3/11 disaster and the later clean up. (Part of a larger Guggenheim-funded project concerned with the unmaking of the modern built world, and what it means for the future of human health.)

   

Brett L. Walker is Regents Professor and Michael P. Malone Professor of History at Montana State University, Bozeman. His research and teaching interests include Japanese history, world environmental history, and the history of science and medicine. He is author of The Conquest of Ainu Lands: Ecology and Culture in Japanese Expansion, 1590-1800, The Lost Wolves of Japan, Toxic Archipelago: A History of Industrial Disease in Japan, and the forthcoming A Concise History of Japan, from Cambridge University Press. He has also co-edited two volumes. He spends most of his time in southwestern Montana and the San Juan Islands, where he enjoys the outdoors.


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16th Annual Africa Day Business Forum and Celebration Dinner

African Studies Program

Saturday November 8, 2014
8:00am - 10:00pm
Motif Hotel - 1415 5th Avenue Seattle, WA

Various presenters

African Chamber of Commerce of the Pacific Northwest

Irine Kariuki (206) 256-6139

'Wake up to the New Africa"

Business and Investment Opportunities

Join us for the 16th Annual Africa Day Business Forum, an all-day event of net-working and learning about the many business and trade opportunities between Africa and the Pacific Northwest. At the forum, you will have the chance to hear from and speak with local and international experts about expanding your business abroad. Come join us and meet your local business, community, and political leaders to discuss the many trade opportunities with Africa! The Africa Day Business Forum is an all-day conference that includes a morning business forum and lunch, panel discussions, a dinner auction, and local African entertainment. There will also be opportunities to have one-on-one sessions with Ambassadors and other presenters.

INVITED SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

§ Honorable Senator Maria Cantwell, US Senator for Washington State

§ Honorable Congressman Jim McDermott

§ Honorable Ed Murray, Mayor of Seattle

§ H.E. Ambassador Liberata Mulamula, Ambassador of the United Republic of Tanzania to the U.S.

§ H.E. Ambassador Amina Salum Ali, African Union Ambassador

§ Honorable Governor Jackson Mandago, Governor Uasin Gishu County

§ H.E. Mrs. Fatima Haram Acyl, Trade and Industry Department African Union Commission

§ H.E. Ambassador Martin Andjaba, Ambassador of the Republic of Namibia to the U.S.

§ Mr. Anthony Carroll, VP Manchester Trade Limited, INC.

§ Mr. Kevin Boyd, US Department of Commerce

§ Mr. John Brislin, Director of Export-Import Bank of Seattle

§ Mr. Albert Shen, National Deputy Director for Minority Business Development Agency

§ Ms. Barlin H. Ali, Program Coordinator at the Center of International Disaster Information USAID

§ Doug Kemper, President & CEO of Export Finance Assistance Center of Washington State

 

Register Now!

Call: (206) 256-6139

Email: afrcan.chamberofcommerce@commerce.wa.gov

Or visit: www.africanchamberofcommercePNW.com

 

 


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Tasveer Presents: 9th Seattle South Asian Film Festival

South Asia Center

Friday October 31, 2014 to Sunday November 9, 2014
Times: various
Locations: various

Sponsored by Tasveer

http://ssaff.tasveer.org/2014/

The Seattle South Asian Film Festival (SSAFF) is a 10-day film festival produced by Tasveer for people to discover, experience, and enjoy through a range of South Asian films, workshops, and forums. SSAFF creates a lively, stimulating, and focused environment for conversation, education, and exploration of issues that face South Asia and its Diaspora. SSAFF 2014 is organized in collaboration with UWBothell and Cascadia Community College and Roxy Cinema, Renton.

Full schedule:
http://ssaff.tasveer.org/2014/


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People of a Feather: Survival in a Changing Canadian Arctic

Canadian Studies Center

Monday November 10, 2014
3:30-4:20pm
134 Thomson Hall

Joel Heath, director and producer of People of a Feather

Canadian Studies Center

canada@uw.edu

Joel Heath, director and producer of People of a Feather, will discuss his research in Hudson’s Bay, the economy of the Inuit from the Belcher Islands, and his film. 

[30]


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Kisses to the Children Film Screening with Director, Vassilis Loules

Hellenic Studies

Jewish Studies Program

Monday November 10, 2014
7:00pm - 9:30pm
Majestic Bay Theatres

Director Vassilis Loules

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies, Hellenic Studies, Seattle Jewish Film Festival, and Majestic Bay Theatres

rsteel44@uw.edu

Five Greek-Jewish children, who were saved by Christian families during the German Occupation, five “hidden children” who lived in total silence, tell their stories.

The film follows Rosina, Iossif, Eftyhia, Shelly, and Marios from childhood to present day, revealing their hidden stories and invaluable personal documents – a diary of a child, photographs and home movies, grew old, carrying the memory of thousands of children, those who were never given the time to grow up.

Offering a glimpse into the past, Kisses to the Children depicts the life of Greek Jewish communities before the War, complemented with rare images of Occupied Greece from archival material, as well as amateur films by German soldiers and illegal footage shot by Greek patriots.

Tickets for this event are free and can be reserved at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/

(115 mins. Greek w/English subtitles. )


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BRAND-NAME CAPITALISM, ADVERTISING AND THE MAKING OF MODERN CONJUGALITY IN WESTERN INDIA, 1920-1945

South Asia Center

Monday November 10, 2014
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Thomson Hall 317, UW Campus Seattle WA 98195

Douglas Haynes

UW South Asia Center

206-543-4800

 Douglas Haynes of DaHaynes Illustrationrtmouth University will present on media, marriage and advertising in late colonial India.
Professor Haynes specializes in the history of South Asia, but he has a strong comparative interest in colonialism and in anti-colonial struggles as is suggested by his recent course offerings: Colonialism, Nationalism and Revolution in Southeast Asia; Colonialism, Development and the Environment in Africa and Asia; Guerrilla Warfare and Counter-Insurgency in Asia, Africa and Latin America; and Colonialism and Culture in Asia. Focusing in his research on the history of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century western India, he has covered such topic areas as cities and urban politics, artisans and merchants, capitalism, consumption and advertising, masculinity, conjugality and sexuality. His recent book, Small-Town Capitalism in Western India: Artisans, Merchants and the Making of the Informal Economy, 1870-1960 (Cambridge University Press) won the John F. Richards Prize of the American Historical Association for the most distinguished book in English on South Asian history for 2012. He has previously completed Rhetoric and Ritual in Colonial India, a study on the cultural accommodations of elites in Surat, a small Indian city, to British domination.


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Ethnomusicology Visiting Artist Event: Didik Nini Thowok

Southeast Asia Center

Monday November 10, 2014
7:30 PM
Brechemin Auditorium

Didik Nini Thowok and Christina Sunardi

School of Music

csunardi@uw.edu

Didik Nini Thowok, a master dancer from Java, Indonesia, is known throughout Indonesia for his unique style combining classical, folk, modern, and comedic dance forms. One of the few artists to continue the long Indonesian tradition of “Traditional Cross Gender“ in the dance form, Didik is renowned for his talent in impersonating female characters and for his skill in various dance traditions such as topeng (mask dance), Sundanese, Cirebon, Balinese, and of course Central Javanese. In this free event, Didik Nini Thowok and School of Music faculty member Christina Sunardi perform cross-gender dances and discuss Didik’s work as an artist. More info


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Korean Peninsula Forum 2014: The Regional Dynamics in Northeast Asia and the Future of US-South Korean Alliance

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

East Asia Resource Center

Jackson School Information

Japan Studies Program

Korea Studies Program

Wednesday November 12, 2014
5:30-9:00 PM
Kane Hall - Walker-Ames Room

Christopher Hill

Center for Korea Studies

uwcks@uw.edu

 

5:30 - 7:00 PM: Reception
7:00 - 8:00 PM: Ambassador Hill’s talk
8:00 - 9:00 PM: Panel discussion, Q&A session

For the first ground-breaking event for the Korean Peninsula Forum, which aims at enhancing the understanding and visibility of issues related to the Korean peninsula in the Northwest America and beyond, Center for Korea Studies invites Christopher Robert Hill, the former United States ambassador to the Republic of Korea, to give a public presentation. Ambassador Christopher Hill will discuss the current events surrounding Northeast Asia, drawing on his foreign service experience to elucidate underlying causes as well as consequences on the region’s geopolitical dynamics and the US-South Korea relations.

The presentation will start at 7:00 PM and last approximately an hour, following the reception at 5:30 PM. Moderated by Professor Donald Hellmann, Professors Kenneth Pyle, David Bachman, and Clark Sorensen will discuss the dimensions and implications of his talk. Finally, the forum will be open for questions and answers from the general public.

Ambassador Christopher Robert Hill is the Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at The University of Denver, a position he has held since September 2010. In addition to overseeing the Josef Korbel School, Ambassador Hill is author of the forthcoming Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy: A Memoir, a monthly columnist for Project Syndicate, and a highly sought public speaker and voice in the media on international affairs. Ambassador Hill is a former career diplomat, a four-time ambassador, nominated by three presidents, whose last post was as Ambassador to Iraq, April 2009 until August 2010. Prior to Iraq, Hill served as Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2005 until 2009 during which he was also the head of the US delegation to the Six Party Talks on the North Korean nuclear issue. Earlier, He was the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea.  


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From Empires to Nation States

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 12, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Devin Naar

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

 

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.


In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.


Part 2: From Empires to Nation-States
The Great War irrevocably transformed the map of Europe and the Middle East by provoking the dissolution of the major empires of the Hapsburgs, Romanovs, and Ottomans. This lecture will focus on the final years of the Ottoman Empire, the role of the war in galvanizing new nation-states in the region, and the cataclysmic impact of these processes on diverse populations. Professor Naar will also explain how issues at stake in 1914 continue to echo today in the lands of the former Ottoman empire.


Devin E. Naar is a Professor of History, the Marsha and Jay Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies, and Chair of the Sephardic Studies Program at the University of Washington. He teaches courses on Jewish history, the Ottoman Empire, and Greece, and is completing a book about the city of Salonica.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


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Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature at UBC: Why We Eat our Relatives

Canadian Studies Center

Thursday November 13, 2014
4-6pm
101 Thomson Hall

Daniel Heath Justice, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture and Chair of the First Nations Studies Program at the University of British Columbia

Canadian Studies Center, Comparative History of Ideas, and Latin and Caribbean Studies

canada@uw.edu

Daniel Heath Justice, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture and Chair of the First Nations Studies Program at the University of British Columbia, will discuss subsistence and ceremonial hunting (or one’s other-than-human relatives) in Indigenous kinship practices arguing that kinship predation is necessary to Indigenous ecocultural resurgence. 


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The Case of the Missing Indigene: Current Discussions of Ethnic Policy Reform in China

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Thursday November 13, 2014
3:30 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Mark Elliott, Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History, Harvard University

cgreed@uw.edu

The last few years have seen a vigorous public policy debate emerge over a “second-generation” ethnic policy (di’erdai minzu zhengce) which, if implemented, would constitute a major revision of ethnic politics in China. Despite the fact that nationalities policy is a notoriously sensitive subject within China, the debate is happening openly in newspapers, academic journals and on the Internet. The prominence accorded to anthropological theory and international comparison is a second notable feature of the debate. This lecture first explores the main positions in the ongoing policy discussion, then goes on to argue that, rather than comparing China’s non-Han peoples to minority immigrant populations in the industrialized democracies, a better comparison is to indigenous peoples. It then considers why this perspective is completely missing from the present debate.

Mark Elliott is the Mark Schwartz Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and the Department of History at Harvard University, and Director of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. A leading figure in what is sometimes called the “New Qing History,” he is the author of two books, "The Manchu Way: The Eight Banners and Ethnic Identity in Late Imperial China" (Stanford, 2001), and "Emperor Qianlong: Son of Heaven, Man of the World" (Longman, 2009), along with numerous articles. Apart from Qing history and Manchu studies, Elliott’s research and teaching interests focus on the long relationship between the Chinese heartland and the peoples living in the northern frontier.


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Back to the Indiginous: Re-Imagining Spirituality in Response to Climate Change

African Studies Program

Comparative Religion

Thursday November 13, 2014
7 PM - 9 PM
Communications Bldg, room 120

James Perkinson, Ecumenical Theological Seminary

Comparative Religion

lpaxton@uw.edu

 A long-time activist and educator from inner city Detroit, where he has a history of involvement in various community development initiatives and low-income housing projects, Perkinson holds a PhD in theology from the University of Chicago, with a secondary focus on history of religions. His books include: White Theology: Outing Supremacy in Modernity and Shamanism, Racism, and Hip-Hop Culture: Essays on White Supremacy and Black Subversion. He has written extensively in both academic and popular journals on questions of race, class and colonialism in connection with religion and urban culture. He is in demand as a speaker on a wide variety of topics related to his interests and a recognized artist on the spoken-word poetry scene in the inner city.

Jim  is particularly concerned to understand the way white supremacy, as an effect of colonial Christian practices, continues to be reproduced in mainstream Western cultures. In addition, he explores how the creative forms of cultural resistance developed by marginalized groups and indigenous peoples can critically challenge Christianity today.


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Applied International Studies MA Online Info Meeting

Master of Arts in Applied International Studies

Thursday November 13, 2014
5:00pm (PDT)
Online

Jennifer Butte-Dahl

maais@uw.edu

 Learn more about the Master of Arts in Applied International Studies and speak with the Program Director, Jennifer Butte-Dahl. RSVP here.

www.appliedinternationalstudies.uw.edu


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Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature at UBC - Lunch Workshop

Canadian Studies Center

Friday November 14, 2014
11:30-1:30pm
408 Savery Hall

Daniel Heath Justice, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture and Chair of the First Nations Studies Program at the University of British Columbia

Canadian Studies Center, Comparative History of Ideas, and Latin and Caribbean Studies

canada@uw.edu

Daniel Heath Justice, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture and Chair of the First Nations Studies Program at the University of British Columbia, will discuss subsistence and ceremonial hunting (or one’s other-than-human relatives) in Indigenous kinship practices arguing that kinship predation is necessary to Indigenous ecocultural resurgence.

 


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Empire is in the Heart: A Conference on Carlos Bulosan

Southeast Asia Center

Friday November 14, 2014
9:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
HUB, Room 145

Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies; UW Department of English; Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest; and the Southeast Asia Center

hbcls@uw.edu

One of the most important figures in Filipino American history, Carlos Bulosan is best known for America is in the Heart, a searing novel of the Great Depression and a classic of Asian American literature.

In marking the centennial of Carlos Bulosan’s birth, this conference will address the relationship between his artistic and political approaches, re-situating his novels in relation to both Philippine and American literary traditions, his politics in relation to the socialist and liberal democratic currents of his era and our own, and his place in understanding the braided histories of labor migration, racial formation, Filipino diasporic imagination, and imperial expansion in the American Asia-Pacific before and after World War II.

Event Facebook Page


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Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday November 14, 2014
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Jordan Gans-Morse, Northwestern Grad Student

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

 Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: Nora Williams, UW Political Science


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China's International Relations Seen Through the Modern History of Acupuncture

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Friday November 14, 2014
12:00 p.m.
Thomson Hall 317

Bridie Andrews, Professor of History, Bentley University

cgreed@uw.edu

Modern acupuncture developed in China in stages corresponding to China's dominant international trading partners. This talk examines the influence of Japanese science on acupuncture before 1949, the Soviet Union's influence during the Maoist period, the influence of the United States during the period of Chinese economic reform, and concludes with a description of how China's own influence as a major economic power is reflected in the new WHO standards for acupuncture.

Bridie Andrews studied biology and the history of medicine in the UK. Her book, The Making of Modern Chinese Medicine, was recently published by the University of British Columbia Press. She also co-edited Medical Transitions in Twentieth Century China (Indiana University Press, 2014). Currently associate professor of history at Bentley University, she has worked at Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, and SOAS (University of London).


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Should the Translator Work Alone? – Thoughts on Translating Haruki Murakami

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday November 14, 2014
5:00-6:30 PM
Communications Room 226

Anna Zielinska-Elliott, Boston University

Co-sponsored by the UW Japan Studies and China Studies Programs

For more information please contact japan@uw.edu

Haruki Murakami once wrote, “I often receive questions from the translators translating my books, which I reply to. There are many cases when I myself do not understand what I wrote. [. . .] If a translation can be read smoothly and effortlessly, and thus enjoyably, then it does its job as a translation perfectly well—that is my basic stance as the original author.” Given these sentiments, one may well ask whether the translator should consult with the author at all, especially when he does not understand the target language. This presentation will discuss a different kind of collaboration – one not involving the author – between translators of Haruki Murakami’s work translating into languages other than English, and will explore some of the ways in which the absence or presence of an English translation influences the choices made by Murakami translators into other languages.

Educated in Poland and Japan, Anna Zielinska-Elliott teaches Japanese language, literature, and translation studies at Boston University, where she is head of the Japanese language program. She is also a translator of modern Japanese literature into Polish. Best known as a translator of Murakami Haruki, she has also translated Mishima Yukio, Yoshimoto Banana and other writers, and is the author of a literary guidebook to Murakami’s Tokyo as well as articles on Murakami and on European translation practices relating to contemporary Japanese fiction. Currently, she is editing a forthcoming special issue of Japanese Language and Literature on translating Murakami in Europe.


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Trade with China: Past, Present, and Future

China Studies Program

East Asia Center

Monday November 17, 2014
3:30-5:00 p.m.
Gates Hall 133

Ambassador Charlene Barshefsky, Former United State Trade Representative

Asian Law Center

Please RSVP to asianlaw@uw.edu

UW School of Law and the Asian Law Center proudly welcome you to attend this special lecture on Monday, November 17. Ambassador Charlene Barshefsky, named by the National Law Journal as among the "100 Most Influential Lawyers in America" in 2013, will present on the topic of “Trade with China: Past, Present, and Future.”

Ambassador Barshefsky is WilmerHale's Senior International Partner. Her practice centers on international business transactions, the structuring and negotiation of commercial agreements and the removal of trade and regulatory impediments to exporting to or investing in markets throughout Asia, Europe and Latin America. She joined WilmerHale after serving as the US Trade Representative—the chief trade negotiator and principal trade policymaker for the United States—from 1997 to 2001, and acting as deputy USTR from 1993 to 1996. Ambassador Barshefsky is best known internationally as the architect and chief negotiator of China's historic WTO Agreement, as well as global agreements in financial services, telecommunications, intellectual property rights, high-technology products and cyberspace.

Ambassador Barshefsky has a BA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a JD from the Columbus School of Law of the Catholic University of America, and is admitted to the D.C. bar. Her professional activities include the America-China Society, the Foreign Policy Association, the American Academy of Diplomacy, and the Council on Foreign Relations. She has also recently co-authored an article in the Wall Street Journal titled: "Win-Win Possibility for China-US Trade".

Please RSVP to asianlaw@uw.edu


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FLAS Fellows to Igoolik, Nunavut, Canada

Canadian Studies Center

Wednesday November 19, 2014
3:30-4:20pm
134 Thomson Hall

Jason Young, geography, and Walter O’Toole, creative writing and Arctic studies

Canadian Studies Center

canada@uw.edu

Jason Young, geography, and Walter O’Toole, creative writing and Arctic studies, spent three weeks in Igoolik, Nunavut studying Inuktitut with Alexina Kublu. Jason and Walter will provide a presentation on their experience in the community. Mick Mallon, Inuktitut instructor, and Alexina Kublu, former Language Commissioner from Nunavut, will be present.

[30]


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Evans School Research Seminar Series

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 19, 2014
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
The Parrington Hall Forum

Jennifer Otten

ekwein@uw.edu or 206.685.8983

Evans School Research Seminar Series
Title TBD

Jennifer Otten
Assistant Professor
School of Public Health, University

Wednesday, November 19, 2014
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Parrington Hall Forum

This event is open to:
Students, Faculty, Staff
This event has been categorized as:
Lectures and Presentations
For further information please contact:
Ellen Weinstein
ekwein@uw.edu
206.685.8983


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Electrifying India Book Launch

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Wednesday November 19, 2014
3:30 PM
Thomson Hall 317, UW Campus, Seattle

Sunila S. Kale, Assistant Professor of International Studies at UW

South Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, UW

sascuw@uw.edu

 Sunila S. Kale, Assistant Professor of International Studies at UW, will present from her recently published book Electrifying India: Regional Political Economies of Political Development.

Throughout the 20th century, electricity was considered to be the primary vehicle of modernity, as well as its quintessential symbol. In India, electrification was central to how early nationalists and planners conceptualized Indian development, and huge sums were spent on the project from then until now. Yet despite all this, sixty-five years after independence nearly 400 million Indians have no access to electricity.Electrifying India explores the political and historical puzzle of uneven development in India’s vital electricity sector.

In some states, nearly all citizens have access to electricity, while in others fewer than half of households have reliable electricity. To help explain this variation, this book offers both a regional and a historical perspective on the politics of electrification of India as it unfolded in New Delhi and three Indian states: Maharashtra, Odisha, and Andhra Pradesh. In those parts of the countryside that were successfully electrified in the decades after independence, the gains were due to neither nationalist idealism nor merely technocratic plans, but rather to the rising political influence and pressure of rural constituencies. In looking at variation in how public utilities expanded over a long period of time, this book argues that the earlier period of an advancing state apparatus from the 1950s to the 1980s conditioned in important ways the manner of the state’s retreat during market reforms from the 1990s onward.


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Home Fronts and Battle Fronts

Jackson School Information

Wednesday November 19, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

Jordanna Bailkin

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

  

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures


The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.
In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.

Part 3: Home Fronts and Battle Fronts
One of the most enduring concepts that we associate with the Great War is the idea of diametrically opposed “home fronts” and “battle fronts.” Many of those who waged the war—and those who wrote about it afterwards—upheld this distinction between the bloody, scarred world of the men in the trenches and the sacred preserve of women and children non-combatants. Professor Bailkin’s lecture will look more closely at the idea of home fronts and battle fronts, considering the ways in which the Great War generated, but also ultimately challenged the idea of an absolute divide between the worlds of soldiers and civilians.

Jordanna Bailkin is the Giovanni and Amne Costigan Endowed Professor in European History at the University of Washington, where she teaches classes on British, European, and imperial history. She is the author, most recently, of the prize-winning book, The Afterlife of Empire. She is currently writing a book about refugee camps in Britain.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.
 


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West and Central African Art: Unambiguous Discourse

African Studies Program

Thursday November 20, 2014
5:00-9:00pm
Tobya Art Gallery

Tobya Art Gallery

Tobya Art Gallery

(206) 436-9205 / info@TobyaArtGallery.com


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Trade + Aid: Exploring both the harmony and the discord (Intersections in International Affairs)

Master of Arts in Applied International Studies

Thursday November 20, 2014
Happy hour begins at 5:30pm. Discussion will take place from 6:30-7:30.
Impact Hub Seattle; 220 2nd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104

maais@uw.edu

 TRADE + AID

Trade + Aid is the first event in a new public series entitled Intersections in International Affairs. These events will explore the places in between - where ideas collide, innovation blooms, and dreams of strategic partnerships are conceived…and sometimes crushed.

The Intersections series is designed to engage the growing community of international affairs stakeholders in honest and provocative conversations about the work occurring at the intersections of government, business, and philanthropy. And how we can do it better.


Trade + Aid: Exploring both the harmony and the discord

Date: November 20th
Time: Happy hour begins at 5:30pm. Discussion will take place from 6:30-7:30. Location: Impact Hub Seattle; 220 2nd Ave S, Seattle, WA 98104


PANELISTS:

Lisa Cohen, Executive Director, Washington Global Health Alliance (co-moderator)

Lisa Cohen is the Executive Director of the Washington Global Health Alliance (WGHA), a coalition of the state’s leading global health research and development organizations. WGHA supports and advances Washington State’s global health community as a nexus for research, education, training and delivery on the world stage. WGHA membership includes global health organizations, educational institutions, and private and public entities.

Eric Schinfeld, President, Washington Council on International Trade (co-moderator)

Eric Schinfeld is the President of the Washington Council on International Trade (WCIT). He leads WCIT’s advocacy and outreach efforts on trade policy issues that benefit Washington employers and increase our state’s international competitiveness.

David Owens, Vice President for Corporate Development, World Vision

David develops collaborations and partnerships with major Fortune 500 corporations, large foundations and leading nonprofits toward the shared goal of addressing the root causes of extreme poverty and injustice. Key sectors of focus include Water, Health, Education, Economic Development and Agriculture, in addition to humanitarian assistance for millions of disaster survivors, refugees and internally displaced people. World Vision is a Christian humanitarian organization working with children, families and their communities in nearly 100 countries around the globe.

David Burroughs, Vice Chairman, Cascade Designs

David Burroughs is Vice Chairman of Cascade Designs, a Seattle based manufacturer of outdoor, military, and medical products sold in 50+ countries. The company’s outdoor product brands include Therm-a-Rest®, MSR®, SealLine®, and Platypus®. The company also performs funded research and development work for government, military, and global health clients. David has supported the company’s evolving global health work.

The Intersections series is brought to you by the new accelerated Master of Arts in Applied International Studies (MAAIS) program at the University of Washington in collaboration with the World Affairs Council of Seattle. It is made possible by the generous support of the Henry M. Jackson Foundation.


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Pivot to Asia: Business Implications and Opportunities

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Thursday November 20, 2014
5:30-7:00 PM
Anthony’s Forum, Dempsey Hall

Ambassador John Roos, Ambassador to Japan 2009-2013

Sponsored by the Foster School of Business' UW Global Business Center with the generous support of the Tateuchi Foundation.

For more information contact jgkraft@uw.edu

In 2011, the Obama Administration announced its priority to “pivot” U.S. relations focus to the Asia-Pacific Region. Ambassador Roos will discuss his perspective on U.S.-Japan relations, economic opportunities and the role of the tech industry in the Asia-Pacific region. The event will be moderated by Dr. Joe Massey, Dartmouth Professor Emeritus and Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Japan and China from 1985-1992.

Ambassador Roos is currently a member of the Board of Directors at Salesforce.com and Sony Corporation and the Global Advisory Board of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group. Previously, Ambassador Roos served as CEO and Senior Partner at Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich, & Rosati, the leading law firm in
the U.S. in the representation of technology, life sciences, and emerging growth companies.

RSVP online: http://bit.ly/Tateuchi2014


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Structure of the Inuit Language in Canada

Canadian Studies Center

Friday November 21, 2014
3:30-5:00pm
301 Miller Hall

Mick Mallon, Canada’s preeminent linguist in Inuktitut, and Alexina Kublu, former Language Commission from Nunavut, Canada

Canadian Studies Center, Linguistics Society of UW

canada@uw.edu

The Linguistics Society of UW and the Canadian Studies Center present Mick Mallon, Canada’s preeminent linguist in Inuktitut, and Alexina Kublu, former Language Commission from Nunavut, Canada. Mick and Alexina will discuss the language structure, dialects and sound systems of the language.


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Variation in Rationality in Foreign Policy Decision-Making

Center for Global Studies

Friday November 21, 2014
12:00 -1:20 PM
Gowen 1A (Olson Room)

Brian Rathbun, Associate Professor of International Relations, Univ. of Southern CA

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment, Richard B. Wesley Graduate Student Fund for International Relations, Center for Global Studies, and Dep't of Political Science

tleonard@uw.edu


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Yamagiwa and the Origins of Chemical Carcinogenesis

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday November 21, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM
Allen Library, Allen Auditorium

James Bartholomew, Emeritus Professor Ohio State University

Sponsored by he UW Japan Studies Program and Seattle Art Museum Garden Center for Asian Art and Ideas. Bartholomew will also present at the Seattle Art Museum November 22 in the Stimson Auditorium. For ticket information visit: http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/GardenCenter/default.asp

For more information please contact japan@uw.edu

During World War I whose centennial we presently acknowledge, a little-known professor of pathology at Tokyo University – Katsusaburo Yamagiwa – proved for the first time that chemical exposure can cause cancer in human beings and some other animals. He and his associate, Koichi Ichikawa, generated cancer in a laboratory setting by painting coal tar on the epithelial tissue of rabbits’ ears. This was a path-breaking achievement in the history of modern medicine and its implications resonate to this day. The generation of tumors took about 22 months. Convincing everyone they had succeeded took another eight years. And proper recognition took considerably longer (perhaps a dozen more). What did it mean? And why should we care? The reasons are multi-faceted and complex, and will be explored in this seminar.

 

Professor Bartholomew is a specialist in modern Japanese history, chiefly interested in the history of science, medicine, higher education, and business in Japan. In 1985-86, he held a research fellowship from the National Science Foundation. His 1989 book, The Formation of Science in Japan received the 1992 Pfizer Award of the History of Science Society and was issued in paperback in February 1993. In March 2001, he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship to write a book on Japan and the Nobel science prizes, 1901-1949.


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Arctic Security: A Canadian Perspective

Canadian Studies Center

Monday November 24, 2014
3:30-4:20pm

Joël Plouffe, Former Visiting Quebec Professor

Canadian Studies Center

canada@uw.edu

Joël Plouffe will join us via skype from Québec, Canada to provide a Canadian and Québec perspective on Arctic security. Plouffe, with
École nationale d'administration publique in Montréal, is a former Québec Visiting Scholar with Canadian Studies. 

[30]


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"SOUTH KOREA-THE WORLD’S MOST WIRED NATION: A Real-Life Case Study on Digital Rights and the Internet."

East Asia Center

Tuesday November 25, 2014
3:30-5:00 p.m.
Gates Hall 447

Professor Sang Jo Jong

Asian Law Center

Please RSVP to asianlaw@uw.edu

Please RSVP to asianlaw@uw.edu


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December 2014

Inuit Printmaking in Siberia & Canadian Influences

Canadian Studies Center

Monday December 1, 2014
3:30-4:20pm
134 Thomson Hall

Howie Coleman, director of the Seattle Native Arts Fan Club

Canadian Studies Center

canada@uw.edu

Howie Coleman, director of the Seattle Native Arts Fan Club, is involved in a unique project to assist in the development of a printmaking economy for Uelen, Chukotka, Russia. Utilizing skills developed in the Canadian Arctic, the community of Uelen is working to further develop its arts economy. 

[30]


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"Are Parental Welfare Work Requirements Good for Children? Evidence from Age-of-Youngest-Child Exemptions"

Jackson School Information

Monday December 1, 2014
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
The Parrington Hall Forum

Chris Herbst

ekwein@uw.edu or 206.685.8983

Evans School Research Seminar Series
"Are Parental Welfare Work Requirements Good for Children? Evidence from Age-of-Youngest-Child Exemptions"

Chris Herbst
Assistant Professor
School of Public Affairs, Arizona State University

Monday, December 1, 2014
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Parrington Hall Forum

This event is open to:
Students, Faculty, Staff
This event has been categorized as:
Lectures and Presentations
For further information please contact:
Ellen Weinstein
ekwein@uw.edu
206.685.8983


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Griffith and Patricia Way Lecture 2014: Japan’s New “Jury” System: A Five-Year Progress Report

Japan Studies Program

Wednesday December 3, 2014
7:00 PM
Kane Hall 225

Daniel H. Foote, Professor of Law University of Washington and University of Tokyo

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Griffith and Patricia Way Lecture Endowment

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

In May 2009, following a five-year period for planning and preparation, Japan’s new so-called jury system went into operation. The talk will begin with a discussion of the background and debates leading up to introduction of the new system, including the motivations for introduction and concerns surrounding the system before it went into effect. The talk then will turn to an appraisal of the system based on its first five years in operation.

Daniel Foote teaches Fall and Winter Terms at the University of Washington and Summer Term at the University of Tokyo. Since becoming professor at the University of Tokyo in 2000, Foote has been a close observer of the overall justice system reform process and an active participant in legal education and other reforms. He has served on numerous governmental and professional committees, including the Roundtable Discussion Group on Criminal Policy convened by the Public Prosecutor General of Japan and the Citizens’ Council of the Japan Federation of Bar Associations.

Space is limited, please register HERE.


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Cultural Death and Radical Hope

Jackson School Information

Wednesday December 3, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

John Toews

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

 

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures

The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.
In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.

Part 4: Cultural Death and Radical Hope
By tracing the post- 1914 transformation of the legacy of philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, Professor Toews will examine how the critical intellectual traditions of the central European fin-de-siècle were recreated and transfigured in the shadow of catastrophe. Toews will place Nietzsche’s legacy in the context of contemporaneous developments within the intellectual traditions of Marxism and psychoanalysis, showing how disillusionment with the foundational myths of Western humanism and historicism produced widespread commitment to the radical cultural construction of a “New Man” and new “World Order,” a commitment that ultimately culminated in the fascist regimes of the 1920s and 1930s.

John Toews is the Joff Hanauer Distinguished University Professor for Western Civilization and Professor of History and the Comparative History of Ideas. He teaches courses in modern European intellectual history and his most recent book is Becoming Historical:Cultural Reformation and Public Memory in Early Nineteenth-Century Berlin. He is currently finishing a book on the early history of psychoanalysis.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


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International Ladino Day

Jewish Studies Program

Thursday December 4, 2014
7:00pm - 9:30pm
Kane Hall - Room 130

Sephardic Studies, Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 Join us for 2014′s International Ladino Day on December 4th at 7pm. Celebrations will be held in Room 130 in Kane Hall at the University of Washington.

Seattle’s first International Ladino Day took place at University of Washington’s Hillel. Hosted by the Sephardic Studies Program of the Stroum Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies in collaboration with our local Sephardic community, this celebration of the Ladino language and Sephardic culture included poetry readings, the singing of Ladino songs, and a presentation of the history of Seattle’s Sephardic community.


Learn more about International Ladino Day, 2013


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Applied International Studies MA Info Meeting

Master of Arts in Applied International Studies

Thursday December 4, 2014
5:00pm (PDT)
1325 Fourth Ave., Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98101 - Room 405

Jennifer Butte-Dahl

maais@uw.edu

Learn more about the Master of Arts in Applied International Studies and speak with the Program Director, Jennifer Butte-Dahl. Meeting is in-person in downtown Seattle, more information and to RSVP click here.

www.appliedinternationalstudies.uw.edu
 


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Science Fiction in South and North Korea

East Asia Center

East Asia Resource Center

Jackson School Information

Korea Studies Program

Friday December 5, 2014
3:30-5:00PM
Thomson 317

Dong-won Kim

Center for Korea Studies

uwcks@uw.edu

 Why have science fiction novels and movies been so unpopular in South Korea? Why have North Korean leaders so enthusiastically supported science fiction? How and in what way have their political, cultural and historical backgrounds influenced making different attitudes toward science fiction? By analyzing science fiction in South and North Korea, Dr. Dong-won Kim will show you very different popular images of science and technology in two Koreas and search the causes of these strange phenomena.

Dr. Dong-Won Kim is a historian of science. He received a PhD from Harvard University in 1991.He has taught at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (1994-2005), Johns Hopkins University (1998-99. 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2012) and Harvard University (2013 -). He was the Dean of the College of Cultural Science at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (2009-2012). Since the fall of 2008, he has been the president of the D. Kim Foundation for the History of Science and Technology in East Asia, which provides young scholars with fellowships and grants.


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Doubled Languages and the Divided “I” in the Early Fiction of Kim Talsu

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday December 5, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM
Savery Hall Room 132

Christina Yi, University of British Columbia

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program

For more information please contact japan@uw.edu

The unconditional surrender of Japan to the Allied Powers in 1945 introduced a decisive discursive break for what had previously been an empire spanning across Northeast and Southeast Asia. The Allied Occupation of Japan (1945–1952) witnessed lasting changes not only in the political arena, but also in the ways “Japan” and “the Japanese” themselves were defined and discussed. This talk illuminates some of these postwar changes – as well as some prewar continuities – by looking at the writings of Kim Talsu (1919–1997), one of the most prominent zainichi (resident Korean) writers of his generation. Born in Korea but raised primarily in Japan, Kim remained in Japan after the war and became heavily involved in leftist politics and literary culture there. While his post-1945 fiction celebrated the end of the Japanese empire, the forms those narratives took ironically underscored the impossibility of fully separating the colonial from the “post”-colonial.

 

Christina Yi is Assistant Professor of Modern Japanese Literature at the University of British Columbia. In 2011, Christina was awarded the William F. Sibley Memorial Translation Prize for her translation of Kim Saryang’s “Tenma” (Pegasus). She is currently working on a book manuscript that investigates how linguistic nationalism and national identity intersect in the formation of modern literary canons in East Asia.


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Flory Jagoda Film and Concert

Jewish Studies Program

Saturday December 6, 2014
6:30pm - 9:00pm
Stroum Jewish Community Center

Flory Jagoda and Friends

Stroum Jewish Community Center and the Sephardic Studies Program

rsteel44@uw.edu

 Keeper of the flame of Sephardic music, songbird Flory Jagoda takes audiences on a spellbinding, magical journey through songs and storytelling. Born in Sarajevo, Bosnia, Jagoda blends Ladino, her mother tongue, with Balkan cultural traditions.

 

The program kicks off with a film premiere of Flory’s Flame, a new documentary that weaves Jagoda’s life story with the director’s of the film. Flory’s Flame traces her family’s Spanish Jewish roots from the Inquisition to the former Yugoslavia and culminates in a concert at the Library of Congress and her life’s work bringing this rich cultural heritage to international audiences. Following the film, Jagoda will be joined for a performance by hand-picked musicians: family, apprentices, and students steeped in the rich sounds of Sephardic traditions.

 

Tickets can be purchased from the Stroum Jewish Community Center, here: http://sjcc.org/cultural-arts/music/florys-flame-and-legacy/


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Christianity in Japan: Some Observations on Sadao Watanabe's Faith

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday December 8, 2014
4:00-5:00 PM
Allen Auditorium, Allen Library

Fred G. Notehelfer

Sponsored by the UW Libraries

For more information contact azusat@uw.edu

Tracing the background of Christianity in Japan from its introduction to the present, Dr. Notehelfer will make note of the challenges that Christians faced in Modern Japan, World War II, and the Postwar period and will highlight Sadao Watanabe's links to the Mingei Movement and its efforts to counter the pressures of a modern, industrialized society.

 

Fred G. Notehelfer was born to German Missionary parents in Japan in 1939. He grew up in Tokyo, graduated from the American School in Japan, and received his B.A. from Harvard College in 1962. His Ph.D. was taken at Princeton University in 1968 in Japanese History. After teaching briefly at Princeton he joined the UCLA History Department in 1969. From 1975-1995 he served as the UCLA Director of the USC-UCLA Joint Center in East Asian Studies and since 1992 he has directed the UCLA Center for Japanese Studies.

Notehelfer specializes in the late Tokugawa and Meiji periods. He is particularly interested in the social and intellectual history of Japan's transition from a "traditional" to a modern society. He is also interested in what Japanese have done with universal systems of thought imported into Japan from the West and Asia. His books include Kōtoku Shōsui: Portrait of a Japanese Radical (Cambridge, 1971); American Samurai: Captain L.L Janes and Japan (Princeton, 1985); and Japan Through American Eyes, the Journal of Francis Hall, Kanagawa and Yokohama, 1859-1866 (Princeton, 1992). He has recently completed an abridged edition of the Francis Hall journal which has been published by Westview Press 2001.” (http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/history/notehelfer/)


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Exhibit: Art Prints of Watanabe Sadao: Christianity through Japanese Folk Art

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday October 27, 2014 to Tuesday December 30, 2014

Exhibit held in Allen Library's North Lobby and in the East Asia Library (Located at Gowen Hall 3rd Floor)

For more information contact azusat@uw.edu

This exhibit shows works of Japanese printmaker and artist Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996), famous for his biblical prints which were influenced by the mingei-undo, the Japanese folk art movement of the late 1920s and 1930s. This exhibit showcases Watanabe's stencil prints, original stencils, tools of the artist, and monographs from the UW East Asia Library collection on mingei and mingei artists.


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January 2015

Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday January 23, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Linxiu Zhang, Chinese Academy of Sciences/REAP-China

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: Jennifer Noveck  


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Mitsubishi Corporation Lecture Series 2014-15: Japan's Energy Challenges after Fukushima

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday January 26, 2015
7:00 - 8:30 PM
Kane Hall 220

Taro Kono, Japan Diet House of Representatives

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Mitsubishi Corporation

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

SAVE THE DATE

Check back for more information in the coming month.

Taro Kono of the Japan Diet House of Representatives will give a talk about Japan's changing energy dynamics in the aftermath of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. A graduate of Georgetown University in Washington, DC, Rep. Kono is currently serving his 6th term in office. Kono has championed consumer issues in LDP and successfully established the new labeling rules on Genetically Modified Organisms. He sponsored the Consumer Protection Law of 2004 and enacted the Anti-Skimming Law of 2005, and has played a leading role in the passage of legislation on various environmental issues including leading the debate on global warming issues. His criticism of Japan's nuclear policy and his opposition to the building of new nuclear power plants has been in the spotlight since the 2011 disaster.

Free and open to the public.


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JewDub Talks

Jewish Studies Program

Tuesday January 27, 2015
7:00 pm
UW Tower Auditorium

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 JewDub Talks returns in 2015 with an exciting new slate of mini-lectures. Check back soon for more information.

 

More information can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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February 2015

CITY DWELLERS: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM INDIA

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Saturday August 30, 2014 to Sunday February 15, 2015
SAAM Hours
Seattle Art Museum, 1300 1st Ave, Seattle WA

Various

Seattle Art Museum

http://seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/citydwellers

 Bollywood movie culture, venerated politicians, religious traditions, and art historical icons all contribute to the myriad of influences in contemporary urban Indian culture. The artists in this exhibition pay tribute to this multitude even as they introduce elements of irony, introspection, and critique.

Through their photography and sculpture, the artists negotiate diverse ideas and influences on contemporary Indian society—Hindu mythology, Bollywood movies, Indian and western art, and icons of everyday life in a global market economy. Many of the works are influenced as much by popular movie culture and the use of digital technology as by the conventions of religious ritual and street processions, traditional theater, and dance.

Come see the colorful, contradictory, and complex India of today through the works of some of the country’s leading artists.


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Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday February 20, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Yoav Dumam, UW Political Science Graduate Student

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

"Bolstering the National Project: Competitive Nation Building and Immigration in Israel and Quebec" Faculty Discussant: Kathie Friedman , Jackson School UW 


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March 2015

Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Tuesday March 3, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Michael Albertus, University of Chicago

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: David Lopez, UW Political Science 


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Sephardic Highlight at the Seattle Jewish Film Festival

Jewish Studies Program

Sunday March 15, 2015
TBD
TBD

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 Annual Sephardic-focused programming at the Seattle Jewish Film Festival. Time and location still to be determined.

 

More information can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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Welcome Reception and Lecture by Prof. Mika Ahuvia

Jewish Studies Program

Tuesday March 31, 2015
7:00 pm
Hillel UW - 4745 17th Ave NE

Prof. Mika Ahuvia

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 More information can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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April 2015

Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday April 3, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Nahomi Ichino, University of Michigan

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: Daniel Yoo, UW Political Science
 


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Active Defense: Explaining the Evolution of China's Military Strategy

China Studies Program

Friday April 17, 2015
12:00 p.m.
Olson Room--Gowen Hall

Taylor Fravel, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachussets Institute of Technology

cgreed@uw.edu


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May 2015

Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Tuesday May 5, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Aaron Erlich, UW Political Science Graduate Student

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Faculty Discussant: Scott Radnitz 


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June 2015

STUDY CANADA Summer Institute - Across the Salish Sea: Canada-US Connections in the Pacific Northwest

Canadian Studies Center

Monday June 22, 2015 to Friday June 26, 2015

Seattle, WA to Victoria, BC

Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada, Canadian Studies Center, UW, and Canadian American Center at Western Washington University

canada@uw.edu

The US today faces unprecedented demand for globally competent citizens and professionals. To this end, U.S. Department of Education Title VI grants support language training programs and area studies, including Canada, so that students learn more about the world and transnational trend. The U.S.D.O.E.-designated Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada offers the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators annually to provide American educators with an excellent foundation for teaching about our vital political, economic, environmental and cultural relationships with Canada. For more than 35 years, teachers from every state have learned about core social studies topics related to Canada—such as geography, history, government, and economics—from university faculty and other experts. Important outcomes have always included gaining global perspectives of civic issues, receiving numerous resources for classroom use, and developing curricula that meet Common Core, C3 and state standards.

Registration opens November 1, 2014 and closes May 1, 2015 (or earlier, if maximum of 20 reached). See attached handout for additional details, visit www.k12studycanada.org/scsi.html for latest updates,​ or contact tina.storer@wwu.edu for further information. Flyer and registration info 


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