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The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

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Jackson School Calendar of Events

For more events you can view each center or program's events page or go to the archive and advanced search link above. You can subscribe to our events mailing list here:
http://mailman13.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/jsis-uw

All Events

December 2014

Inuit Printmaking in Siberia & Canadian Influences

Canadian Studies Center

Monday December 1, 2014
3:30-4:20pm
134 Thomson Hall

Howie Coleman, director of the Seattle Native Arts Fan Club

Canadian Studies Center

canada@uw.edu

Howie Coleman, director of the Seattle Native Arts Fan Club, is involved in a unique project to assist in the development of a printmaking economy for Uelen, Chukotka, Russia. Utilizing skills developed in the Canadian Arctic, the community of Uelen is working to further develop its arts economy. 

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"Are Parental Welfare Work Requirements Good for Children? Evidence from Age-of-Youngest-Child Exemptions"

Jackson School Information

Monday December 1, 2014
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
The Parrington Hall Forum

Chris Herbst

ekwein@uw.edu or 206.685.8983

Evans School Research Seminar Series
"Are Parental Welfare Work Requirements Good for Children? Evidence from Age-of-Youngest-Child Exemptions"

Chris Herbst
Assistant Professor
School of Public Affairs, Arizona State University

Monday, December 1, 2014
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Parrington Hall Forum

This event is open to:
Students, Faculty, Staff
This event has been categorized as:
Lectures and Presentations
For further information please contact:
Ellen Weinstein
ekwein@uw.edu
206.685.8983


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A Celebration of Asian and Comparative Law Scholarship

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Tuesday December 2, 2014
3:30-5:30 PM
William H. Gates Hall, Room 115

Sponsored by the Asian Law Center

For more information please contact asianlaw@uw.edu

The University of Washington School of Law is distinguished by a long standing tradition of research and scholarship on Asian and comparative law and by a vibrant Visiting Scholars Program. We are honored to host many senior legal career professionals, policy makers and eminent academics from around the world. Please join Dean Testy, faculty and friends for

A Celebration of Asian and Comparative Law Scholarship
- Presenting the Asian Law Center 50th Anniversary Publication, and
- Honoring our distinguished Visiting Scholars 

Please RSVP to asianlaw@uw.edu

 

 

Learn more about the Asian Law Center 50th Anniversary publication Legal Innovations in Asia: Judicial Lawmaking and the Influence of Comparative Law, and about UW Law's 2014-15 Visiting Scholars.

 


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2014 Master Teacher Workshop: Europe's Transformative 20th Century

Center for West European Studies

Ellison Center

European Union Center of Excellence

Jackson School Information

Joint Outreach

Tuesday November 18, 2014 to Tuesday December 2, 2014
5:00 -- 8:00 pm
Thomson Hall 317

Dr. Tom Taylor, Seattle University; Dr. James Felak, UW; Steve Pfaff, UW; Frank Wendler, UW; Tina Gourd, UW

Center for West European Studies

cwes@uw.edu

Please join us for a two-part fall master teacher workshop on "Europe's Transformative 20th Century" for K-14 educators!

Timed to coincide with the anniversaries of the start of World War I and fall of the Berlin Wall, this workshop will explore how Europe transformed from a continent of warring nations to one of peaceful unification and cooperation between 1914 and 1989.

K-14 participants who attend both the 11/18 and 12/2 sessions will receive six clock hours. The cost is $30 and includes clock hours, dinner, parking, and materials. Fees are non-refundable. Space is limited and priority goes to full-time teachers.

Register here: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/cwes/249957.
 

For more information, please email the Center for West European Studies at cwes@uw.edu.
 


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Griffith and Patricia Way Lecture 2014: Japan’s New “Jury” System: A Five-Year Progress Report

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Wednesday December 3, 2014
7:00 PM
Kane Hall 225

Daniel H. Foote, Professor of Law University of Washington and University of Tokyo

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Griffith and Patricia Way Lecture Endowment

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

In May 2009, following a five-year period for planning and preparation, Japan’s new so-called jury system went into operation. The talk will begin with a discussion of the background and debates leading up to introduction of the new system, including the motivations for introduction and concerns surrounding the system before it went into effect. The talk then will turn to an appraisal of the system based on its first five years in operation.

Daniel Foote teaches Fall and Winter Terms at the University of Washington and Summer Term at the University of Tokyo. Since becoming professor at the University of Tokyo in 2000, Foote has been a close observer of the overall justice system reform process and an active participant in legal education and other reforms. He has served on numerous governmental and professional committees, including the Roundtable Discussion Group on Criminal Policy convened by the Public Prosecutor General of Japan and the Citizens’ Council of the Japan Federation of Bar Associations.

7:00 PM Lecture

8:00 PM Reception

Space is limited, please register HERE.


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Cultural Death and Radical Hope

Jackson School Information

Wednesday December 3, 2014
7 p.m.
Kane 130

John Toews

University of Washington Alumni Association and the Department of History

206-543-0540 or http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html

 

This is the first of a four-part series of lectures on "The Great War and the Modern World." Visit UWalum.com/history for information on series passes and tickets to individual lectures

The war that broke out in 1914 was both a global war and a total war. When it was over, it had left few beliefs unshaken. The status of great powers, the hierarchy of peoples and nations, the security of domestic ties, the assurance of roles for men and women, and the rightness of colonial rule—nothing remained as it had been.
In a series of lectures, faculty from the University of Washington Department of History offer four perspectives on the Great War one hundred years after it began.

Part 4: Cultural Death and Radical Hope
By tracing the post- 1914 transformation of the legacy of philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, Professor Toews will examine how the critical intellectual traditions of the central European fin-de-siècle were recreated and transfigured in the shadow of catastrophe. Toews will place Nietzsche’s legacy in the context of contemporaneous developments within the intellectual traditions of Marxism and psychoanalysis, showing how disillusionment with the foundational myths of Western humanism and historicism produced widespread commitment to the radical cultural construction of a “New Man” and new “World Order,” a commitment that ultimately culminated in the fascist regimes of the 1920s and 1930s.

John Toews is the Joff Hanauer Distinguished University Professor for Western Civilization and Professor of History and the Comparative History of Ideas. He teaches courses in modern European intellectual history and his most recent book is Becoming Historical:Cultural Reformation and Public Memory in Early Nineteenth-Century Berlin. He is currently finishing a book on the early history of psychoanalysis.

Admission
Complete Series Pass
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $28
General Public $35
Students $15

Individual Lectures
UWAA/UWRA members & veterans $10
General Public $12
Students $5

Register by calling the UW Alumni Association at 206-543-0540 or visiting http://www.washington.edu/alumni/learn/2014history.html.


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You’re Invited: A Jackson School Holiday Get-Together

Academic Services Office

Alumni Relations

Career Services

Jackson School eNewsletter

Jackson School Information

Thursday December 4, 2014
5:30 p.m.
Parrington Hall, Commons (3rd Floor)

JSIS Alumni Relations

jsisalum@uw.edu

With classes almost done for the quarter, JSIS students, staff, faculty and alumni are invited to join us December 4th for a special Jackson-themed event with reception to follow.

For this year's holiday get-together, we'll welcome board members and executive staff from the Henry M. Jackson Foundation as we look at the role the Jackson Foundation plays in our community, the impact it has on students, and what the legacy of Senator Jackson means in the world today. Come mingle, chat with friends, and enjoy some treats to celebrate the end of the year! Details are as follows:

Date: Thursday December 4th, 2014

Time: Doors open from 5:30 p.m; program begins at 6:00 p.m.

Venue: The Parrington Hall Commons (3rd Floor), UW Seattle Campus


To help us get a better idea of how much catering we'll need to order, please take a minute and RSVP to JSIS Alumni Relations Director John Charlton via jcharltn@uw.edu today to be a part of the fun.

We hope that you can join us!


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Canada, Asia & the Future of the Arctic Council

Canadian Studies Center

Thursday December 4, 2014
3:30-4:20pm
134 Thomson Hall

Vincent Gallucci, Chair of Canadian Studies

Canadian Studies Center

canada@uw.edu

Vincent Gallucci, Chair of Canadian Studies, will discuss the growing role of the Asian countries, particularly China, on the Arctic COuncil. During Canada's Chairmanship of the Council, China was admitted as a permanent observer. Did Canada's relations with China have anything to do with China's successful application? 

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International Ladino Day

Jewish Studies Program

Thursday December 4, 2014
7:00pm - 9:30pm
Kane Hall - Room 130

Sephardic Studies, Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 Join us for 2014′s International Ladino Day on December 4th at 7pm. Celebrations will be held in Room 130 in Kane Hall at the University of Washington.

Seattle’s first International Ladino Day took place at University of Washington’s Hillel. Hosted by the Sephardic Studies Program of the Stroum Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies in collaboration with our local Sephardic community, this celebration of the Ladino language and Sephardic culture included poetry readings, the singing of Ladino songs, and a presentation of the history of Seattle’s Sephardic community.


Learn more about International Ladino Day, 2013


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Applied International Studies MA Info Meeting

Master of Arts in Applied International Studies

Thursday December 4, 2014
5:00pm (PDT)
1325 Fourth Ave., Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98101 - Room 405

Jennifer Butte-Dahl

maais@uw.edu

Learn more about the Master of Arts in Applied International Studies and speak with the Program Director, Jennifer Butte-Dahl. Meeting is in-person in downtown Seattle, more information and to RSVP click here.

www.appliedinternationalstudies.uw.edu
 


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First Friday Lecture: Sonal Khullar

South Asia Center

Friday December 5, 2014
Time: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Location: Seattle Art Museum, Plestcheeff Auditorium, 1300 1st Ave, Seattle, WA 98101

Presenter: Sonal Khullar

Sponsor: Seattle Art Museum

Contact: http://www.seattleartmuseum.org/visit/calendar/events?EventId=29372

Sonal Khullar, Assistant Professor in Art History at the University of Washington, discusses SAM’s exhibition City Dwellers: Contemporary Art From India.

Prof. Khullar's talk will be entitled The Mela (Fair) and the Museum: Contemporary Art and Public Culture in India. This talk situates City Dwellers in the context of recent exhibitions of contemporary Indian art in the West and debates on public culture, theorized by scholars as a contact zone between elite and popular practices in South Asia. Many of the artworks in the show engage popular visual culture and vernacular culture industries associated with the bazaar (market) in South Asia. They recall the operations of the mela (fair), an extraordinary type of bazaar, and blur the boundaries between the public and private, secular and sacred, high and low.

The artists in City Dwellers offer a distinctive view of the city, globalization, and post-liberalization India. Their work also summons a long history of modernism and modernity through close engagements with colonial photographers, nationalist leaders, film stars, and modern artists. Tracing connections between modern and contemporary art, I show how visual art in India functions as a critique of society and politics, and as a domain of action and reflection.

Admission is free to members and adults over the age of 62 on the First Friday of every month. For other visitors, this lecture is free with museum admission.


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Science Fiction in South and North Korea

East Asia Center

East Asia Resource Center

Jackson School Information

Korea Studies Program

Friday December 5, 2014
3:30-5:00PM
Thomson 317

Dong-won Kim

Center for Korea Studies

uwcks@uw.edu

 Why have science fiction novels and movies been so unpopular in South Korea? Why have North Korean leaders so enthusiastically supported science fiction? How and in what way have their political, cultural and historical backgrounds influenced making different attitudes toward science fiction? By analyzing science fiction in South and North Korea, Dr. Dong-won Kim will show you very different popular images of science and technology in two Koreas and search the causes of these strange phenomena.

Dr. Dong-Won Kim is a historian of science. He received a PhD from Harvard University in 1991.He has taught at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (1994-2005), Johns Hopkins University (1998-99. 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2012) and Harvard University (2013 -). He was the Dean of the College of Cultural Science at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (2009-2012). Since the fall of 2008, he has been the president of the D. Kim Foundation for the History of Science and Technology in East Asia, which provides young scholars with fellowships and grants.


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Doubled Languages and the Divided “I” in the Early Fiction of Kim Talsu

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Friday December 5, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM
Savery Hall Room 132

Christina Yi, University of British Columbia

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program

For more information please contact japan@uw.edu

The unconditional surrender of Japan to the Allied Powers in 1945 introduced a decisive discursive break for what had previously been an empire spanning across Northeast and Southeast Asia. The Allied Occupation of Japan (1945–1952) witnessed lasting changes not only in the political arena, but also in the ways “Japan” and “the Japanese” themselves were defined and discussed. This talk illuminates some of these postwar changes – as well as some prewar continuities – by looking at the writings of Kim Talsu (1919–1997), one of the most prominent zainichi (resident Korean) writers of his generation. Born in Korea but raised primarily in Japan, Kim remained in Japan after the war and became heavily involved in leftist politics and literary culture there. While his post-1945 fiction celebrated the end of the Japanese empire, the forms those narratives took ironically underscored the impossibility of fully separating the colonial from the “post”-colonial.

 

Christina Yi is Assistant Professor of Modern Japanese Literature at the University of British Columbia. In 2011, Christina was awarded the William F. Sibley Memorial Translation Prize for her translation of Kim Saryang’s “Tenma” (Pegasus). She is currently working on a book manuscript that investigates how linguistic nationalism and national identity intersect in the formation of modern literary canons in East Asia.


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Flory Jagoda Film and Concert

Jewish Studies Program

Saturday December 6, 2014
6:30pm - 9:00pm
Stroum Jewish Community Center

Flory Jagoda and Friends

Stroum Jewish Community Center and the Sephardic Studies Program

rsteel44@uw.edu

 Keeper of the flame of Sephardic music, songbird Flory Jagoda takes audiences on a spellbinding, magical journey through songs and storytelling. Born in Sarajevo, Bosnia, Jagoda blends Ladino, her mother tongue, with Balkan cultural traditions.

 

The program kicks off with a film premiere of Flory’s Flame, a new documentary that weaves Jagoda’s life story with the director’s of the film. Flory’s Flame traces her family’s Spanish Jewish roots from the Inquisition to the former Yugoslavia and culminates in a concert at the Library of Congress and her life’s work bringing this rich cultural heritage to international audiences. Following the film, Jagoda will be joined for a performance by hand-picked musicians: family, apprentices, and students steeped in the rich sounds of Sephardic traditions.

 

Tickets can be purchased from the Stroum Jewish Community Center, here: http://sjcc.org/cultural-arts/music/florys-flame-and-legacy/


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Measuring the Impact of Global Health Crises

Center for Global Studies

Monday December 8, 2014
5:30 - 8:30 PM
The Landing at Northcut, 5001 25th Ave NE, Seattle WA

Dr. Matthew Sparke, Dr. Ann Marie Kimball, Patty Hayes, and Sylvia Stellmacher

World Affairs Council and Center for Global Studies

alutterloh@world-affairs.org

 Join Global Classroom to go beyond the headlines in examining the current Ebola outbreak and its impact on global health. First, educators will hear from Dr. Matthew Sparke, Professor at the University of Washington Department of Global Health.  Dr. Sparke will give an overview of current global health trends and examine how different ways of understanding globalization shape different approaches to implementing and evaluating global health policies.

Next we will have a discussion focusing on the various impacts of the Ebola outbreak. We will be joined by Patty Hayes, Interim Director of Public Health for Seattle and King County, and Dr. Stephen Gloyd, Associate Chair for Education and Curriculum at UW Department of Global Health and Executive Director of Health Alliance International. How has the spread of the virus affected the economies of West African countries? How does this impact the global economy? What long-term strategies are being implemented to reduce infections and educate populations about the virus? What does the effort look like on the ground? Teachers are invited to join the conversation by asking their own questions of our panelists.

Finally we will pose the question: What advice would you give teachers as they discuss the Ebola outbreak or other global health issues? What should students know? Sylvia Stellmacher, Global Citizenship Fellow, U.S. Fund for UNICEF will share TeachUNICEF’s global education classroom resources on Ebola. Special Edition: Stop Ebola is an abbreviated version of the TeachUNICEF Global Citizenship Brief aimed at educators looking for standards-aligned classroom resources on the Ebola crisis unfolding in West Africa.   $30.00 includes presentations, resource packet, light buffet, and 3 clock hours. To register, please visit www.world-affairs.org/events

.

 


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Christianity in Japan: Some Observations on Sadao Watanabe's Faith

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday December 8, 2014
4:00-5:00 PM
Allen Auditorium, Allen Library

Fred G. Notehelfer

Sponsored by the UW Libraries

For more information contact azusat@uw.edu

Tracing the background of Christianity in Japan from its introduction to the present, Dr. Notehelfer will make note of the challenges that Christians faced in Modern Japan, World War II, and the Postwar period and will highlight Sadao Watanabe's links to the Mingei Movement and its efforts to counter the pressures of a modern, industrialized society.

 

Fred G. Notehelfer was born to German Missionary parents in Japan in 1939. He grew up in Tokyo, graduated from the American School in Japan, and received his B.A. from Harvard College in 1962. His Ph.D. was taken at Princeton University in 1968 in Japanese History. After teaching briefly at Princeton he joined the UCLA History Department in 1969. From 1975-1995 he served as the UCLA Director of the USC-UCLA Joint Center in East Asian Studies and since 1992 he has directed the UCLA Center for Japanese Studies.

Notehelfer specializes in the late Tokugawa and Meiji periods. He is particularly interested in the social and intellectual history of Japan's transition from a "traditional" to a modern society. He is also interested in what Japanese have done with universal systems of thought imported into Japan from the West and Asia. His books include Kōtoku Shōsui: Portrait of a Japanese Radical (Cambridge, 1971); American Samurai: Captain L.L Janes and Japan (Princeton, 1985); and Japan Through American Eyes, the Journal of Francis Hall, Kanagawa and Yokohama, 1859-1866 (Princeton, 1992). He has recently completed an abridged edition of the Francis Hall journal which has been published by Westview Press 2001.” (http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/history/notehelfer/)


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US-Turkey Security Relations

Center for Global Studies

Monday December 15, 2014
6:30 - 8:30 PM
The Landing at Northcut, 5001 25th Ave NE, Seattle WA

Dr. Resat Kasaba

World Affairs Council and Center for Global Studies

tleonard@uw.edu

 In a recent trip to Turkey concluding November 23rd, U.S. Vice President Joe Biden reports that the U.S. – Turkey bilateral relationship is “as strong as it has ever been.” Biden and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan met to discuss cooperation in defeating the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq (ISIS), but significant tensions remain. Washington criticizes Turkey’s reluctance to militarize against ISIS, particularly in Kobane, while Ankara continues to push for U.S. commitment to end Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s government by supporting moderate Syrian opposition rebels.

On December 15th, the World Affairs Council invites you to hear from Dr. Reşat Kasaba, Director of the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies, on present U.S. – Turkey relations, particularly as it concerns ISIS, Syria, and additional security issues in the Middle East.

Prior to the 7:00 PM talk, you are welcome to enjoy Turkish cuisine provided by the World Affairs Council starting at 6:30 PM. Free parking is available at the venue. To register visit: www.world-affairs.org/events.

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Exhibit: Art Prints of Watanabe Sadao: Christianity through Japanese Folk Art

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday October 27, 2014 to Tuesday December 30, 2014

Exhibit held in Allen Library's North Lobby and in the East Asia Library (Located at Gowen Hall 3rd Floor)

For more information contact azusat@uw.edu

This exhibit shows works of Japanese printmaker and artist Sadao Watanabe (1913-1996), famous for his biblical prints which were influenced by the mingei-undo, the Japanese folk art movement of the late 1920s and 1930s. This exhibit showcases Watanabe's stencil prints, original stencils, tools of the artist, and monographs from the UW East Asia Library collection on mingei and mingei artists.


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January 2015

Prophecy in the Quran and Early Islam

Middle East Center

Monday January 12, 2015
12:30 --1:20 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Hamza Zafer

Middle East Center

mecuw@uw.edu

Presenter: Hamza Zafer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization. Part of the "New Voices on the Middle East" series introducing new faculty experts on the Middle East. 


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Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday January 23, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Linxiu Zhang, Chinese Academy of Sciences/REAP-China

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: Jennifer Noveck  


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Mitsubishi Corporation Lecture Series 2014-15: Japan's Energy Challenges after Fukushima

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday January 26, 2015
7:00 - 8:30 PM
Kane Hall 220

Taro Kono, Japan Diet House of Representatives

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Mitsubishi Corporation

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

Taro Kono of the Japan Diet House of Representatives will give a talk about Japan's changing energy dynamics in the aftermath of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster. A graduate of Georgetown University in Washington, DC, Rep. Kono is currently serving his 6th term in office. Kono has championed consumer issues in LDP and successfully established the new labeling rules on Genetically Modified Organisms. He sponsored the Consumer Protection Law of 2004 and enacted the Anti-Skimming Law of 2005, and has played a leading role in the passage of legislation on various environmental issues including leading the debate on global warming issues. His criticism of Japan's nuclear policy and his opposition to the building of new nuclear power plants has been in the spotlight since the 2011 disaster.

Free and open to the public.


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JewDub Talks

Jewish Studies Program

Tuesday January 27, 2015
7:00 pm
UW Tower Auditorium

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 JewDub Talks returns in 2015 with an exciting new slate of mini-lectures. Check back soon for more information.

 

More information can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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February 2015

The Persian Gulf States in Regional and International Politics

Middle East Center

Monday February 2, 2015
12:30 --1:20 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Kristian Coates Ulrichsen

Middle East Center

mecuw@uw.edu

 Presenter: Kristian Coates Ulrichsen is a Lecturer in the Middle East Center. Part of the "New Voices on the Middle East" series featuring new faculty experts on the Middle East.


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The Iranian Academy of Persian Language and Literature: Its History, Methodologies, and Debates

Middle East Center

Friday February 13, 2015
1:30--3:00 p.m.
Smith Hall, Room 306

Farhad Atai, University of Tehran

Persian and Iranian Studies Program

neareast@uw.edu


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CITY DWELLERS: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM INDIA

Center for Global Studies

South Asia Center

Saturday August 30, 2014 to Sunday February 15, 2015
SAAM Hours
Seattle Art Museum, 1300 1st Ave, Seattle WA

Various

Seattle Art Museum

http://seattleartmuseum.org/exhibitions/citydwellers

 Bollywood movie culture, venerated politicians, religious traditions, and art historical icons all contribute to the myriad of influences in contemporary urban Indian culture. The artists in this exhibition pay tribute to this multitude even as they introduce elements of irony, introspection, and critique.

Through their photography and sculpture, the artists negotiate diverse ideas and influences on contemporary Indian society—Hindu mythology, Bollywood movies, Indian and western art, and icons of everyday life in a global market economy. Many of the works are influenced as much by popular movie culture and the use of digital technology as by the conventions of religious ritual and street processions, traditional theater, and dance.

Come see the colorful, contradictory, and complex India of today through the works of some of the country’s leading artists.


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Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday February 20, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Yoav Dumam, UW Political Science Graduate Student

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

"Bolstering the National Project: Competitive Nation Building and Immigration in Israel and Quebec" Faculty Discussant: Kathie Friedman , Jackson School UW 


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March 2015

An Investigation of the 'Political Theology' of the Muslim Brotherhood

Middle East Center

Tuesday March 3, 2015
12:30 --1:20 p.m.
Thomson Hall, Room 317

Sarah Eltantawi

Middle East Center

mecuw@uw.edu

Presenter: Sarah Eltantawi is and Assistant Professor in Comparative Religion at Evergreen State College.  Part of the "New Voices on the Middle East" series introducing new faculty experts on the Middle East.


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Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Tuesday March 3, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Michael Albertus, University of Chicago

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: David Lopez, UW Political Science 


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Sephardic Highlight at the Seattle Jewish Film Festival

Jewish Studies Program

Sunday March 15, 2015
TBD
TBD

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 Annual Sephardic-focused programming at the Seattle Jewish Film Festival. Time and location still to be determined.

 

More information can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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Welcome Reception and Lecture by Prof. Mika Ahuvia

Jewish Studies Program

Tuesday March 31, 2015
7:00 pm
Hillel UW - 4745 17th Ave NE

Prof. Mika Ahuvia

Stroum Center for Jewish Studies

rsteel44@uw.edu

 More information can be found at: jewishstudies.washington.edu/event/


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April 2015

Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Friday April 3, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Nahomi Ichino, University of Michigan

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Grad Student Discussant: Daniel Yoo, UW Political Science
 


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Active Defense: Explaining the Evolution of China's Military Strategy

China Studies Program

Friday April 17, 2015
12:00 p.m.
Olson Room--Gowen Hall

Taylor Fravel, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachussets Institute of Technology

cgreed@uw.edu


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Mitsubishi Corporation Lecture Series 2014-15: Yoshihiko Miyauchi

East Asia Center

Japan Studies Program

Monday April 27, 2015
7:00 - 8:30 PM
Kane Hall 220

Yoshihiko Miyauchi

Sponsored by the UW Japan Studies Program and made possible by the Mitsubishi Corporation

For more information contact japan@uw.edu

Yoshihiko Miyauchi is the Chair of the Orix Foundation, and until recently was CEO of the Orix Corporation -- one of Japan's largest leasing and leading diversified financial services conglomerate in 24 countries worldwide.

Miyauchi received a BA from Kwansei Gakuin University in 1958, followed by an MBA in 1960 from the University of Washington. In addition to being one of Japan's top corporate leaders, Miyauchi is a strong advocate of regulatory reform and serves as president of the Council for Promoting Regulatory Reform, an advisory board to the prime minister of Japan.


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May 2015

Severyns-Ravenholt Seminar in Comparative Politics 2014 - 2015

Jackson School Information

Tuesday May 5, 2015
12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Olson Room, Gowen 1A

Aaron Erlich, UW Political Science Graduate Student

Severyns-Ravenholt Endowment

srscp@uw.edu

Paper Topic TBA
Faculty Discussant: Scott Radnitz 


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Persian and Chagatay Influences on the Kyrgyz Oral Traditions: The Poetry of Moldo Kylych (d. 1917) and Togolok Moldo (d. 1942)

Middle East Center

Friday May 22, 2015
1:30-3:00 p.m.
Smith Hall, Room 306

Jipar Duishembieva

Persian and Iranian Studies Program

neareast@uw.edu


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June 2015

STUDY CANADA Summer Institute - Across the Salish Sea: Canada-US Connections in the Pacific Northwest

Canadian Studies Center

Monday June 22, 2015 to Friday June 26, 2015

Seattle, WA to Victoria, BC

Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada, Canadian Studies Center, UW, and Canadian American Center at Western Washington University

canada@uw.edu

The US today faces unprecedented demand for globally competent citizens and professionals. To this end, U.S. Department of Education Title VI grants support language training programs and area studies, including Canada, so that students learn more about the world and transnational trend. The U.S.D.O.E.-designated Pacific Northwest National Resource Center on Canada offers the STUDY CANADA Summer Institute for K-12 Educators annually to provide American educators with an excellent foundation for teaching about our vital political, economic, environmental and cultural relationships with Canada. For more than 35 years, teachers from every state have learned about core social studies topics related to Canada—such as geography, history, government, and economics—from university faculty and other experts. Important outcomes have always included gaining global perspectives of civic issues, receiving numerous resources for classroom use, and developing curricula that meet Common Core, C3 and state standards.

Registration opens November 1, 2014 and closes May 1, 2015 (or earlier, if maximum of 20 reached). See attached handout for additional details, visit www.k12studycanada.org/scsi.html for latest updates,​ or contact tina.storer@wwu.edu for further information. Flyer and registration info 


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