University of Washington

MIDDLE EAST STUDIES PROGRAM

COURSE OFFERINGS
AUTUMN QUARTER 2001

MIDDLE EAST STUDIES

ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION (5 credits)
Instructor: D. WHEELER (wheelerd@u.washington.edu)
TTh: 1:30-3:20, DEN 216
SISME 210/SLN: 7475
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH NEAR E 210 A/SLN: 6022
Major developments in Islamic civilization from advent of Islam in seventh century to present. Islamic history, law, theology, and mysticism, as well as the politics, cultures, and literatures of the various Islamic societies.

WATER AND CONFLICT IN THE MIDDLE EAST(SPECIAL TOPICS) (5 credits)
Instructor: F. LORENZ
MW: 1:30-3:20, SAV 142
SISME 490 A/SLN: 7476

PEOPLES & CULTURES OF ISLAMIC MIDDLE EAST (SPEC TOPICS) (3 credits)
Instructor: P. HOLMES-EBER (pholmese@u.washington.edu)
TTh: 11:30-12:50, MEB 246
SISME 490 B/SLN: 8693
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH ANTH 318 A/SLN: 1240
This course explores the ethnic, cultural and religious diversity of the Middle East today. Contemporary social, cultural and political change is examined in light of historical, geographic and cultural factors. Topics covered include: the cultural expression of Islam; religious diversity in the Middle East; family and social structure; gender roles and relations; urban, rural and nomadic lifestyles; popular culture, music and art; and ethnic identity and conflicts.

SEM MIDDLE EAST STUDIES (2 credits/no credit))
Professor: R. KASABA (kasaba@u.washington.edu)
To be Arranged: EC THO 111
SISME 530 A/SLN: 7479
Middle Eastern historiography, Islamic law, Islamic theology, relations between the Middle East and the world economy, political structures, social movements in the Middle East.

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (Credit/no credit)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111
TO BE ARRANGED
SISME 499 A/SLN: 7477
SISME 499 B/SLN: 7478

INDEPENDENT STUDY (var credit)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111
TO BE ARRANGED
SISME 600 A/SLN: 7480

MASTERS THESIS (var credit)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111
TO BE ARRANGED
SISME 700/SLN: 7481

ANTHROPOLOGY

PEOPLES & CULTURES OF ISLAMIC MIDDLE EAST (SPEC TOPICS) (3 credits)
Instructor: P. HOLMES-EBER (pholmese@u.washington.edu)
TTh: 11:30-12:50, MEB 246
ANTH 318 /SLN: 1240
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH SISME 490 B/SLN: 8693

ART HISTORY

SURVEY WESTERN ART ANCIENT (5 Credits)
PROFESSOR: C. HALLETT(challett@u.washington.edu)
MWF: 1:30-2:20, KNE 120
TTh: 10:30-11:20, ART 006
ART H 201 AA/SLN: 1416
ADD CODE REQUIRED
Other Session Available
The course provides an introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Near East, the Bronze Age Aegean cultures, ancient Greece, the Hellenistic world, Etruria, and the Roman Empire down to the coming of Christianity. It also offers some preliminary training in visual analysis and a practical introduction to the critical vocabulary of art history.

The content of the course is provided chiefly by the lectures, supplemented by assigned readings from the class textbook. Students are also required to participate in a weekly discussion section, which will work through a series of exercises designed to complement the lectures. These exercises are assigned in advance, and each will necessitate one hour of preparation in the School of Art Media Center. Accordingly, one hour of study in the Media Center per week is a required part of the course.

COMPARATIVE RELIGION

RELIGIONS WESTERN (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: B. WHEELER (wheelerb@u.washington.edu)
MWF: 1:30-2:50, EE1 125
Th: 8:30-9:20, THO 202
RELIG 201 AA/SLN: 7332
Other Sessions Available
History of religions, concentrating on religious traditions that have developed west of the Indus. Primary attention to the Semitic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and to their ancient world background with emphasis on basic conceptual and symbolic structures.

INTRO NEW TESTAMENT (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: M. WILLIAMS (maw@u.washington.edu)
MTWTh: 10:30-11:20, CMU 326
Th: 2:30-3:20, CMU 325
RELIG 220 AA/SLN: 7336
Other Sessions available
This course introduces the modern scholarly study of the New Testament and the socio-cultural milieu within the New Testament literature originated. Attention is given to significant Jewish and Greco-Roman traditions and institutions that were of importance in shaping the earliest Christian movements. The various writings in the New Testament are examined individually, with interest in such issues as: The relationship between the author and audience and the immediate historical context of the writing, if known; literary genre; intertextuality; key religious issues of concern in a given writing, and their relation to the diverse spectrum of developing early Christian thought, practice, and social formation.

HISTORY

MODERN NEAR EAST (3-6 credits)
PROFESSOR: J. Bacharach (jere@u.washington.edu)
W: 1:30-3:20, MGH 293
HIST 563 A/SLN: 4323
EC SMI 206 C
Field course introducing the student to the major periods and problems of Near Eastern history, 1798 to the present.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

STATES & CAPITALISM (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: R KASABA (kasaba@u.washington.edu)
MTThF: 11:30-12:20, KNE 210
W: 8:30-9:20, THO 211
SIS 200 AA/SLN: 7412
Other Sessions Available
States and Capitalism: The Origins of the Modern Global System
This course addresses two questions that are related to the structure of the global system: What are the processes that have created a world economy with systems of production and trade that cover the entire globe? And how is it that this economically united world has been so divided and fragmented in its political structures? The course examines these questions from a historical perspective by focusing on selected times, places, and events between the 13th and 20th centuries. Four days of lectures, one day of discussion per week. Both the lectures and especially the discussion sections rely on student participation.

POLITICAL ISLAM (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: R. BURROWES (burrowes@u.washington.edu)
TTh: 5:30-7:50, THO 211
SIS 406 YA/SLN: 7428
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH POL S 432 YA
Course focuses on the revival since the mid-1970s of political Islam and what has come to be called "Islamic fundamentalism," especially in the Middle East. What are the nature and variety of political Islam today, and how does this resurgence or revival compare to those in the past? What are its causes, and what are its implications for the Islamic world as well as for the rest of the world, the U.S. included? (For example, is it a "threat" to us and our interests?) Finally, is political Islam compatible with democratic politics and international order?

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLITICAL ISLAM (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: R. BURROWES (burrowes@u.washington.edu)
TTh: 5:30-7:50, THO 211
POL S 432 YA/SLN: 6979
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH SIS 406 YA/SLN: 7428
Course focuses on the revival since the mid-1970s of political Islam and what has come to be called "Islamic fundamentalism," especially in the Middle East. What are the nature and variety of political Islam today, and how does this resurgence or revival compare to those in the past? What are its causes, and what are its implications for the Islamic world as well as for the rest of the world, the U.S. included? (For example, is it a "threat" to us and our interests?) Finally, is political Islam compatible with democratic politics and international order?

INTRO TO COMPAR POL (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: E. GOLDBERG (goldberg@u.washington.edu)
MWF: 9:00-10:20, SAV 216
POLI SCI 204 A/SLN: 6949
Political systems in a comparative framework. Traditional and contemporary approaches to the study of governments and societies in different countries. This course will introduce students to comparative politics by an examination of the politics of democratization in the contemporary world. The course will consider both the discussion of democracy as a form of government, the arguments about democratization, and the comparative problems of creating and maintaining viable democratic governments in the contemporary world. The severe constraints on polities in which the task of building both democracies and functioning market economies will also be addressed. Texts. Texts for the course have not been chosen at this time.

RUSSIA, E. EUROPE, AND CENTRAL ASIA

TURKISH PEOPLE IN CENTRAL ASIA (3 credits)'
PROFESSOR: I. CIRTAUTAS
TTh: 1:30-2:50, SAV 316
SISRE 375 A/SLN: 7482
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH NEAR E 375 A
History of the Turkic peoples, AD 552 to present. Emphasis on current status of Turkic peoples in Central Asia. Geographical distribution, demographic data, reactions and adaptations to changes resulting from the 1917 revolution. Turkic viewpoint on past and present developments.

NEAR EASTERN INTENSIVE LANGUAGE COURSES
(For Information Call (206) 543-2320)

ARABIC

ELEMENTARY ARABIC (5 credits)
Instructor: A. Squaiaia
TTh: 12:30-1:20, PAR 108
MWF: 12:30-1:20 SWS 026
ARAB 411 AA/SLN: 1258
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
First quarter of three-quarter series. By the end of the first quarter, students will be able to read and write the Arabic script/texts, converse at the Novice level, and have a good understanding of the Arabic grammar. Oral/aural drills, writing drills, listening drills, lectures about the Arabic grammar and cultures.

ELEMENTARY ARABIC (5 credits)
Instructor: A. Squaiaia
TTh: 12:30-1:20, PAR 108
MWF: 12:30-1:20, PAR 206
ARAB 411 AB/SLN: 1259
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS

ELEMENTARY ARABIC (5 credits)
Instructor: A. Squaiaia
TTh: 12:30-1:20, PAR 108
MWF: 12:30-1:20, PAR 108
ARAB 411 AC/SLN: 1260
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC (5 credits)
Instructor: A. Squaiaia
MTWThF: 11:30-12:20, DEN 313
ARAB 421 A/SLN: 1261
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
First of three-quarter long series that intruduces students to Arabic. Students must take a placement exam prior to enrolling in this course or he or she should have taken ARAB 413 which is offered at he UW. Grammar lectures Reading, writing, and speaking drills Cultral information

ADVANCED ARABIC (3 credits)
PROFESSOR: T. DEYOUNG
TTh: 10:30-11:50, DEN 311
ARAB 431 A/SLN: 1262
Focus on Arabic at the advanced level through in-depth examination of grammar, reading of selected texts, and brief surveys of some major reference materials. Prerequisite: ARAB 423.

SUPERVISED STUDY (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 490 A/SLN: 1263
Special work in literary texts for graduates and undergraduates. Prerequisite: ARAB 423.

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 499 A/SLN: 1264

INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEACH (Var cr)
GRADS ONLY
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 600 A/SLN: 1265

HEBREW

ELEM MODERN HEBREW (5 credits)
PROFESSOR:
MTWThF: 9:30-10:20, ART 006
HEBR 411 A/SLN: 4280
Elementary Biblical Hebrew I
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS

ELEM MODERN HEBREW (5 credits)
PROFESSOR:
MWF: 12:30-1:20, BLM 206
TTh: 12:30-1:20, den 311
HEBR 411 B/SLN: 4281
Add Code Required
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS

INTERMED MODERN HEBREW (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: N. SOKOLOFF (naosok@u.washington.edu)
MTWThF: 10:30-11:20, PAR 120
HEBR 421 A/SLN: 4282
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
Readings of selected texts in modern Hebrew with continuing emphasis on grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: either HEBR 401 or HEBR 413.

BIBLICAL HEBREW POETRY (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: S. NOEGEL snoegel@u.washington.edu)
TTh: 10:30-12:20, DEN..*
HEBR 427 A/SLN: 4283
Explores select poetic sections of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) in conjunction with English translations and commentaries. Emphasis on close readings, the grammatical insights of textual criticism, and the interpretive strategies and agendas of the English translations. Prerequisite: HEBR 333 or HEBR 426.

HEBREW POETRY (3 credits)
PROFESSOR: N. SOKOLOFF (naosok@u.washington.edu)
MWF: 11:30-12:20, SMI 109
HEBR 454 A/SLN: 4284
HEBREW FICTION
Selections of poetry by prominent twentieth-century Hebrew poets whose texts comment or elaborate on biblical texts. Original source considered side-by-side with modern poetry, to examine ways recent literature models itself on, draws upon, and revises traditional sources. Prerequisite: HEBR 423.

SUPERVISED STUDY (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 490 A/SLN: 4285
Special work in literary texts for graduates and undergraduates. Prerequisite: HEBR 423.

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 499 A/SLN: 4286

INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEACH (Var cr)
GRADS ONLY
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 600 A/SLN: 4287

PERSIAN

ELEMENTARY PERSIAN (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: Karimi-Hakkak (karimi@u.washington.edu)
MTWThF: 9:30-10:20, BLM 201
PRSAN 411 A/SLN: 7036
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
Conversation, pronunciation, and graded reading. Persian alphabet and basic sentence constructions. Offers rudimentary conversational and reading ability with a vocabulary of about two thousand words.

INTERMED PERSIAN (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: Karimi-Hakkak (karimi@u.washington.edu)
MTWThF: 10:30-11:20, BLM 409
PRSAN 421 A/SLN: 7037
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
Reading of simple texts with emphasis on reading and writing, conversation skills, grammar, and syntax. Builds a vocabulary of standard Persian in preparation for advanced reading and comprehension of literary texts. Prerequisite: PRSAN 413.

INTRO PERSIAN LITERATURE (3 credits)
PROFESSOR: Karimi-Hakkak (karimi@u.washington.edu)
MF: 1:30-2:50, DEN 213
PRSAN 451 A/SLN: 7038
Prereq: PRSAN 423 or Equivalent
Selected texts from modern and classical Persian poetry and prose. Provides insights into Iranian culture and its past and present achievements in literature. Prepares the student for a more comprehensive and critical study of Persian literature. Prerequisite: PRSAN 423.

SUPERVISED STUDY (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 490 A/SLN: 7039
Special work in literary texts for graduates and undergraduates. Prerequisite: PRSAN 423.

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 499 A/SLN: 7040

INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEACH (Var cr)
GRADS ONLY
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 600 A/SLN: 7041

UZBEK

ELEMENTARY UZBEK (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: I. Cirtautas (icirt@u.washington.edu)
To be arranged
TKIC 411 A/SLN: 8060
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
Introduction to the modern written and spoken language. Cannot be taken for credit if 401 taken.

INTERMED UZBEK (3 credits)
PROFESSOR: I. Cirtautas (icirt@u.washington.edu)
To be arranged
TKIC 421 A/SLN: 8061
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
Continuation of elementary Uzbek. Oral work, grammar, and readings in Uzbek literature. Prerequisite: either TKIC 401 or TKIC 413.

INTRO UZBEK LIT (3 credits)
PROFESSOR:
To be arranged
TKIC 454/SLN: 8062
Readings from selected Uzbek writers.

SUPERVISED STUDY (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 490 A/SLN: 8063
Special work in literary texts for graduates and undergraduates. Prerequisite: either TKIC 404, TKIC 405, or TKIC 423.

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 499 A/SLN: 8064
For Turkic language and literature majors.

INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEACH (Var cr)
GRADS ONLY
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 600 A/SLN: 8065

TURKISH

ELEMENTARY TURKISH (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: S. Kuru (selims@u.washington.edu)
MTWThF: 9:30-1020, PAR 322
TKISH 411 A/SLN: 8066
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
Introduction to modern Turkish. Pronunciation and conversation, grammar and composition, graded reading. Latin characters used throughout. (Cannot be taken for credit if TKISH 401 is taken.)

INTERMED TURKISH (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: S. Kuru (selims@u.washington.edu)
MTWThF: 10:30-1120, BLM 308
TKISH 421 A/SLN: 8067
OPEN TO ALL CLASS LEVELS
Introduction to modern Turkish literature. Prerequisite: TKISH 413.

SUPERVISED STUDY (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 490 A/SLN: 8068
Special work in literary texts for graduates and undergraduates. Prerequisite: TKISH 423.

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 499 A/SLN: 8069

INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEACH (Var cr)
GRADS ONLY
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 600 A/SLN: 8070

COURSES ON RELIGION, CULTURE AND SOCIETY

NEAR EASTERN COURSES IN ENGLISH
(for Information Call Near East Dept. - 543-6033)

ISLAMIC CIVILZATION (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: D. WHEELER (wheelerd@u.washington.edu)
TTh: 1:30-3:20, DEN 216
NEAR E 210 A/SLN: 5988
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH SISME 210 A/SLN: 7463
Major developments in Islamic civilization from advent of Islam in seventh century to present. Islamic history, law, theology, and mysticism, as well as the politics, cultures, and literatures of the various Islamic societies.

TURKIC PEOPLE OF CENTRAL ASIA (3 credits)
PROFESSOR: I. Cirtautas (icirt@u.washington.edu)
TTh: 10-2:50, SAV 316
NEAR E 375 A/SLN: 5989
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH SISRE 375 A
History of the Turkic peoples, AD 552 to present. Emphasis on current status of Turkic peoples in Central Asia. Geographical distribution, demograhic data, reactions and adaptations to changes resulting from the 1917 revolution. Turkic viewpoint on past and present developments.

KAZAKH-KIRGHIZ STUDIES (Special Studies) (3 credits)
PROFESSOR: I. Cirtautas (icirt@u.washington.edu)
NEAR E 496 A/SLN: 5991
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH NEAR E 596 A
Reading of selected texts in modern literary Kazakh, with continuing emphasis on grammar, syntax, and oral practice.

KAZAKH-KIRGHIZ STUDIES (Special Studies) (3 credits)
PROFESSOR: I. Cirtautas (icirt@u.washington.edu)
To be arranged (GRADS ONLY)
NEAR E 596 A/SLN: 5994
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH NEAR E 496 A

LANGUAGE TEACH METH (2 credits)
INSTRUCTOR: K BRANDL (brandl@u.washington.edu)
T: 3:30-5:20, DEN 313
NEAR E 518 A/SLN: 5993
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH SCAN 518 A
Current foreign language teaching methods and approaches. Learning and teaching strategies and techniques for the four skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) including cultural notions. Current and future trends in pedagogy and technology.

SUPERVISED STUDY (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
NEAR E 490 A/SLN: 5990
TO BE ARRANGED

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
NEAR E 499 A/SLN: 5992
TO BE ARRANGED

INDEPEND STUDY/RESCH (Var cr)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
GRADS ONLY
TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 600 A/SLN: 5995

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The Middle East Center
University of Washington
225 Thomson Hall
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-4227 phone
(206) 685-0668 fax
mecuw@u.washington.edu

Ellis Goldberg, Director
goldberg@uw.edu

Felicia Hecker, Associate Director
fhecker@uw.edu