MIDDLE EAST STUDIES PROGRAM

AUTUMN COURSE OFFERINGS
2002

MIDDLE EAST STUDIES
SLN: 8862 SISME 210 AA Introduction Islamic Civilization (5 Cr) D.Wheeler
w/NEAR E 210 AA/SLN: 8859
Other Sections Available
TTh 1:30-3:20 DEN 216
F 12:30-1:20 DEN 211
Major developments in Islamic civilization from advent of Islam in seventh century to present. Islamic history, law, theology, and mysticism, as well as the politics, cultures, and literatures of the various Islamic societies. This course is organized around two methods of studying Islamic Civilization. The first is a broad historical/sociological overview of the peoples, cultures and historic evolution of Islamic society from the advent of Islam to the modern age. In this overview, we will examine Islamic societies from Malaysia to East Africa and those in between. The second method is case study oriented. In the second half of the course we will study two cases of Islamic social circumstance: one is women and Islam, the other is Islamic fundamentalism. This is a general introductory course and know previous knowledge of Islam is assumed.

SLN: 9134 SISME 490 A Spec Stud: Women & the Family in Middle East (3 Cr) Holmes-Eber
M 1:30-4:10 PAR 206
Veiled women, harems, belly dancers, wan faces gazing from behind locked bars--these are the images of Middle Eastern women that have obsessed Western writers, journalists and travelers to the Middle East for centuries. Yet as Graham-Browne observes, much of this imagery reflects Western fantasies and fears, rather than the reality, past or present, of women’s and men’s experiences in the Middle East. This class seeks to provide a more accurate picture of the roles men and women play in the Middle East, and to understand the way in which women’s and men’s identities are created, defined, renegotiated and expressed through, perhaps, the most central cultural institution in the Middle East: the family. 

SLN: 7621 SISME 530 A Seminar in Middle East Studies ( 2 Cr/no cr) Kasaba
EC THO 111
M 3:30-5:20 THO 215
A seminar designed for Masters and Ph.D. students working on topics related to Ottoman Empire, Modern Turkey or comparative projects that include these areas. Admission with permission of the instructor.

SLN: SISME 499 A Undergrad Research (Var Cr, 1-5) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: SISME 499 B Undergrad Research (Cr/no credit) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: SISME 600 A Independent Study/Research (Var Cr, 1-10) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: SISME 700 Masters Thesis (Var Cr, 1-10) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

ANTHROPOLOGY
SLN: 1219 ANTH 100 Intro to Anthropology (5) Green
Other Sections available
MWThF 9:30-10:20 GUG 224
T 8:30-9:20 DEN 209
Everything you ever wanted to know about people: what we came from (not monkeys!); why we are shaped like we are; why gender and "racial" variations exist; why we live together in families; why there is nothing "natural" at all about love; and why we believe some of the things we do about this life and life (so most everyone hopes) after our earthly demise. Anthropology looks at things in the long-term (4 million years or so) and cross-culturally (other cultures with their own, distinctive ways of doing things).

ART HISTORY
SLN: 1441 ART H 309 B Intro to Southeast Asian Art (5) mrazek, j
$10 additional course fee required
MWF 1:30-2:50 ART 003
The history of Southeast Asian textiles is a history of the persistence of local aesthetics and the creative adaptation of foreign design patterns, aesthetics, techniques, and materials—especially Indian, Chinese, Middle-Eastern, and European—as well as cross-fertilization among the regions. This course will introduce students to the variety of Southeast Asian textiles, focusing on their local function, evaluation, uses, and experiences of textiles (on specific occasions, at specific times and places, etc.), as well as on how cultural diversity, cultural interaction, industrialization, and modernization are reflected in textiles.

SLN: 1442 ART H 309 C Early Med and Byz (5) Kartsonis
$10 additional course fee required
MWF 2:30-3:50 ART 317
Christian art and architecture of the Roman and Byzantine empires and of western Europe through the eighth century.

COMPARATIVE RELIGION
SLN: 7456 RELIG 201 AA Religions Western (5 cr) tba
Other Section available
MW: 1:30-3:5 0 EE1 105
Th: 8:30-9:20 THO 101
History of religions, concentrating on religious traditions that have developed west of the Indus. Primary attention to the Semitic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and to their ancient world background with emphasis on basic conceptual and symbolic structures.

SLN: 7464 RELIG 210 A Introduction to Judaism (5 cr) jaffee
MTWThF: 11:30-12:20 THO 125
This course offers a basic introduction to the history of Judaism and the variety of its historical and contemporary expressions.

SLN: 7465 RELIG 220 AA Introduction to New Testament (5 cr) WILLIAMS
Other Section available
MTWTh: 10:30-11:20 EE1 105
Th: 2:30-3:20 SMI 115
Modern scholarly methods of research and analysis in dealing with New Testament books and their interpretation. Genres of various books (gospel, epistle, sacred history, apocalypse); problems of the relationships among author, material, and intended audience; relationships between theme and image.

HISTORY
SLN: 8871 HIST 461 A Middle East 622-1300 (5 cr) bacharach
MWF: 1:30-2:50 RAI 121
Political and economic analysis of the period circa AD 600, preliminary to rise of Islam, to arrival of the Turks. Muhammad's teaching and impact; Islamization and Arabization.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
SLN: 7543 SIS 123 AA Introduction to Globalization (5 cr) SPARKE
w/GEOG 123 AA/SLN: 4197
MWF: 1:30-2:20 KNE 1:30
Provides an introduction to the debates over globalization. Focuses on the growth and intensification of global ties. Addresses the resulting inequalities and tensions, as well as the new opportunities for cultural and political exchange. Topics include the impacts on government, finance, labor, culture, the environment, health, and activism.

SLN: 7561 SIS 344 A Migration in the Global Economy (5 cr) MITCHELL
w/GEOG 344/SLN: 4277
TTh 1030-1220 SMI 405
In this course we will analyze the relationship between human mobility in the late 20th century and changes in the global economy. The course will familiarize students with research on international migration from a diversity of approaches and methods. Topics include the economic context of migration, including an examination of the economic geography of globalization, network theory, and the rise of transnational migration. We will also discuss advanced theoretical topics such as gendered migration, ethnic assimilation, contemporary citizenship and community politics.

SLN: 7566 SIS 406 YA Political Islam and Islamic Fundamentalism (5 cr) BURROWES
w/POL S 432 YA/SLN: 7081
TTh 5:30-7:50 SAV 249
Course focuses on the revival since the mid-1970s of political Islam and what has come to be called "Islamic fundamentalism," especially in the Middle East. What are the nature and variety of political Islam today, and how does this resurgence or revival compare to those in the past? What are its causes, and what are its implications for the Islamic world as well as for the rest of the world, the U.S. included? (For example, is it a "threat" to us and our interests?) Finally, is political Islam compatiPrerequisite: LING 451. Prerequisite: LING 451.ble with democratic politics and international order?

JEWISH STUDIES
SLN: 8970 SISJE 490 Spec Topics: Jews & Arabs (5 Credit) rustow
TTh: 1:30-2:50 SAV 144

LINGUISTICS
SLN: 5028 LING 453 A PHONOLOGY III (4 Credit) R. WRIGHT
TTh 1:30-2:50 SMI 311
Speech sounds, mechanism of their production, and structuring of sounds in languages; generative view of phonology; autosegmental and metrical phonology. This class introduces acoustic and auditory phonetics, and explores the techniques used in experimental phonetics and laboratory phonology. Prerequisite: LING 451.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
SLN: 7105 POL S 432 YA Middle East in North Africa (5 cr) BURROWES
Offered jointly with SIS 406 YA
TTh 5:30-7:50 SAV 249
See SIS 406 YA for course description.

NEAR EASTERN COURSES
(for Information Call Near East Dept. - 543-6033)

NEAR E 210 AA
SLN: 8859
w/SISME 210 AA
Islamic Civilization
WHEELER, D
5
TTh 1:30-3:20
SAV 216
F 12:30-1:20
DEN 211
Major developments in Islamic civilization from advent of Islam in seventh century to present. Islamic history, law, theology, and mysticism, as well as the politics, cultures, and literatures of the various Islamic societies.
Offered: jointly with SISME 210.
NEAR E 375 A
SLN: 8859
Turk People of Central Asia
CIRTAUTAS
3
TTh 1:30-2:50
SAV 213
History of the Turkic peoples, AD 552 to present. Emphasis on current status of Turkic peoples in Central Asia. Geographical distribution, demographic data, reactions and adaptations to changes resulting from the 1917 revolution. Turkic viewpoint on past and present developments.
NEAR E 495 A
SLN: 6131
Trends in the Middle East
WHEELER, D
3
TTh 3:30-4:50
Tho 234
Perspectives on cultural, political, and other aspects of Middle Eastern societies. Focuses on background complexities rather than immediate political-military confrontations. Topics vary. Offered: jointly with SISME 495.

NEAR E 496 A
SLN: 6132
w/NEAR E 596 A/
SLN: 3165 (Grads only)
Special Studies: Kazakh-Kirghiz ” CIRTAUTAS 3 TTh 3:00-4:20 DEN 213
NEAR E 496 B
SLN: 8867
w/NEAR E 596 B
SLN: 8868 (Grads only)
Jerusalem, From King David to the Dome of the Rock” KURU 3 TTh 3:00-4:20
DEN 212
NEAR E 518 A
SLN: 6134
w/SCAND 518
Language Teach Method BRANDL 2 T 3:30-5:20
DEN 209
Current foreign language teaching methods and approaches. Learning and teaching strategies and techniques for the four skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) including cultural notions. Current and future trends in pedagogy and technology.
NEAR E 490 A
SLN: 6130
Supervised Study FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 499 A SLN: 6133 Undergrad Research FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 600 A SLN: 6136 Independent Study/Research
(Grads only)
FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

NEAR EASTERN LANGUAGE COURSES
(for Information Call Near East Dept. - 543-6033)

ARABIC
ARAB 411 AA
SLN: 1258
Open to All Class Levels
ELEMENTARY ARABIC SOUAIAIA
 
5 TTh 12:30-1:20
DEN 216
MWF 12:30-1:20
DEN 311
ARAB 411 AB
SLN: 1259
Open to All Class Levels
ELEMENTARY ARABIC SOUAIAIA
 
5 TTh 12:30-1:20
DEN 216
MWF 12:30-1:20
DEN 311
ARAB 411 AC
SLN: 1260
Open to All Class Levels
ELEMENTARY ARABIC SOUAIAIA
 
5 TTh 12:30-1:20
DEN 216
MWF 9:30-10:20
DEN 311
ARAB 411 Study of grammar, with oral and written drill and reading of simple texts. The first quarter of three-quarter series. By the end of the first quarter, students will be able to read and write the Arabic script/texts, converse at the Novice level, and have a good understanding of the Arabic grammar.
ARAB 421 A
SLN: 1261
Open to All Class Levels
INTERMED ARABIC SOUAIAIA
 
5 MTWThF 11:30-12:20, DEN 205
 
Reading of selected texts in standard Arabic, with continuing emphasis on grammar and syntax.
Prerequisite: either ARAB 401 or ARAB 413.
ARAB 431 A
SLN: 1262
ADVANCED ARABIC To be arranged 3 MWF 1:00-4:10
DEN 205
Focus on Arabic at the advanced level through in-depth examination of grammar, reading of selected texts, and brief surveys of some major reference materials. Prerequisite: ARAB 423.
ARAB 451 A
SLN: 8857
ADAB PROSE: JAHIZ DEYOUNG 3 TTh 10:30-11:50
PAR 313
Readings in early Arabic prose. Prerequisite: ARAB 432.
ARAB 490 A
SLN: 1263
SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 499 A
SLN: 1264
UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 600 A
SLN: 1265
INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH
(Grads only)
FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

HEBREW

HEBR 411 A
SLN: 4334
Open to All Class Levels
ELEMENTARY MODERN HEBREW SOKOLOFF 5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20 DEN 205
Modern Israeli Hebrew. Core vocabulary, grammar, conversational text, and oral and written communication. Excerpts from modern Hebrew prose and poetry. HEBREW 411 is the first quarter of a full year sequence of elementary modern Hebrew (HEBR 412). HEBR 413 are the second and third quarters). The students can expect to develop: --an ability to write and read both print and script, with and without vowels –an ability to participate in and understand basic conversation on everyday topics ---an ability to compose and understand simple written materials on everyday topics –a vocabulary of 500-1000 words
HEBR 414 A
SLN: 4335
ELEMENTARY BIBLICAL HEBREW NOEGEL 5 TTh 10:30-12:20 DEN 206
Offers an inductive introduction to the biblical Hebrew language. Covers the basics of Hebrew grammar while reading the stories of Joseph in the book of Genesis. No prior knowledge of Hebrew necessary.
HEBR 421 A
SLN: 4336
Open to All Class Levels
INTERMED MODERN HEBREW SOKOLOFF 5 MTWThF 10:30-11:20 DEN 213
Readings of selected texts in modern Hebrew with continuing emphasis on grammar, syntax, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: either HEBR 401 or HEBR 413.
HEBR 451 A
SLN: 4337
INTRODUCTION TO HEBREW LIT SOKOLOFF 3 MWF 11:30-12:20 DEN 213
Literary texts and analysis. Grammar, composition, and dictionary skills. Primarily modern texts-short poetry, fiction, and essays-with some selections as well from biblical passages, the liturgy, midrash, and medieval poetry. Prerequisite: HEBR 423.
HEBR 490 A
SLN: 4338
SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 499 A
SLN: 4339
UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 600 A
SLN: 4340
INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH
(Grads only)
FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

PERSIAN

PRSAN 411 A
SLN: 7154
Open to All Class Levels
ELEMENTARY PERSIAN KARIMI-HAKKAK 5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20
DEN 302
Conversation, pronunciation, and graded reading. Persian alphabet and basic sentence constructions.
PRSAN 421 A
SLN: 7155
Open to All Class Levels
INTERMED PERSIAN KARIMI-HAKKAK
 
5 MTWThF 10:30-11:20
DEN 313
Reading of simple texts with emphasis on reading and writing, conversation skills, grammar, and syntax. Builds a vocabulary of standard Persian in preparation for advanced reading and comprehension of literary texts.
Prerequisite: PRSAN 413.
PRSAN 451 A
SLN: 7156
INTRO TO PERSIAN LITERATURE KARIMI-HAKKAK 3 MF 1:30-2:50
DEN 206
Selected texts from modern and classical Persian poetry and prose. Provides insights into Iranian culture and its past and present achievements in literature. Prepares the student for a more comprehensive and critical study of Persian literature. Prerequisite: PRSAN 423.
PRSAN 490 A
SLN: 7157
SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 499 A
SLN: 7158
UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 600 A
SLN:7159
INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH
(Grads only)
FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

TURKIC

TKIC 411 A
SLN: 8200
Open to All Class Levels
ELEMENTARY UZBEK CIRTAUTAS 5 TTh 8:00-9:50 DEN 213
 
Introduction to the modern written and spoken language.
TKIC 421 A
SLN: 8201
Open to All Class Levels
INTERMED UZBEK CIRTAUTAS 3 ThF 10:30-12:20 DEN 311
 
Continuation of elementary Uzbek. Oral work, grammar, and readings in Uzbek literature. Prerequisite: either TKIC 401 or TKIC 413.
TKIC 490 A
SLN: 8202
SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 499 A
SLN: 8203
UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED

TURKISH

TKISH 411 A
SLN: 8205
Open to All Class Levels
ELEMENTARY TURKISH KURU 5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20 DEN 217
 
Introduction to modern Turkish. Pronunciation and conversation, grammar and composition, graded reading. Latin characters used throughout. (Cannot be taken for credit if TKISH 401 is taken.)
TKISH 421 A
SLN: 8206
Open to All Class Levels
INTERMED TURKISH KURU 5 MTWThF 8:30-11:50 PAR 305
 
Introduction to modern Turkish literature. Prerequisite: TKISH 413.
TKISH 490 A
SLN: 8207
SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 490 A
SLN: 8208
UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 600 A
SLN: 8209
INDEPNDNT STDY/RESEACH
(Grads only)
FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

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The Middle East Center
University of Washington
225 Thomson Hall
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-4227 phone
(206) 685-0668 fax
mecuw@u.washington.edu

Ellis Goldberg, Director
goldberg@uw.edu

Felicia Hecker, Associate Director
fhecker@uw.edu