MIDDLE EAST STUDIES PROGRAM

SPRING COURSE OFFERINGS
2001

MIDDLE EAST STUDIES

SLN: 8500
SISME 434 A HUMAN RIGHTS & ISLAM (3 Cr) SOUAIAIA
Offered with RELIG 434 A
TTh: 2:30-3:50 SMI 120
Students will be introduced to three important declarations related to the human rights question. The concepts and principles presented in these documents will be studied during the first three to four weeks. During the second period of the quarter (the middle four weeks), emphasis will be placed on discussing whether the concepts presented in the aforementioned documents were at all addressed in the Qur’ánic discourse as well as in the textual and oral tradition of Mohammed and his “Companions, then by the later scholars during the systemization and codification of classical Islamic law. The last third of the quarter is to be devoted to the present state of affair of human rights issues in the modern Middle East. International law documents such as the constitutions of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Tunisia, Egypt, and Pakistan will be investigated.

SLN: 6878
SISME 490 A SPEC TOPICS: ISLAM & GENDER (3 Cr) HOLMES-EBER
Offered jointly with WOMEN 490 A
TTh: 11:30-12:50 PAR 322
“ISLAM AND GENDER”
Perhaps no other religion in the world has been more criticized for its patriarchal and misogynistic views on women than Islam. Yet curiously Islam is one of the fastest growing world religions, embraced by both women, as well as men, who argue that Islamic teachings are grossly misunderstood. Today within the Muslim community, men’s and women’s roles and rights are fiercely debated, indicating an immense amount of variability in interpretation and an effort to formulate a “new Islam” for the twenty-first century. This course will examine Islamic views of gender roles, both historically, and within the past few decades. We will explore the religious and social bases for laws and customs regarding women’s status and rights in Muslim countries around the world--including the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Europe and the U.S. Contrasting women’s experiences we will focus on some of the most vigorously debated issues: veiling, Muslim family law, Muslim feminist movements and women’s rights to express their own religious beliefs in both Muslim and non-Muslim countries.

SLN: 6681
SISME 590 A SPEC TOPICS (3 Cr) KURU
Offered jointly with HUM 596 B
Grads Only
W: 1:30-3:20 CMU 326
“IMPERIAL REFLECTIONS: OTTOMAN CULTURAL LEGACY”
The main purpose of this seminar is a critical review of the scholarly works on Ottoman art and art history in order to contextualize and problematize the Ottoman cultural legacy. The seminar will focus on the historical development of Ottoman architecture, calligraphy, miniature painting, book production, and text composition, and the way they function in Ottoman society.

SLN: 6879
SISME 499 A Undergrad Research (Var Cr, 1-5) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: 6880
SISME 499 B Undergrad Research (Cr/no credit) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: 6882
SISME 600 A Independent Study/Research (Var Cr, 1-10) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

SLN: 6883
SISME 700 Masters Thesis (Var Cr, 1-10) TO BE ARRANGED
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111

ARCHITECTURE

SLN: 1261 A
ARCH 251 WORLD ARCHITECTURE: NON WESTERN CULTURES (3 Cr) PRAKASH
TTh 9:00-10:20 MGH 389
Introduction to historical and contemporary built environments of non-Judeo-Christian civilizations, primarily Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, and Meso-American, as manifestations of cultural history and as responses to environmental determinants.

SLN: 8451
ARCH 498 H COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY IN ISLAMIC ARCHIT (3 Cr) SAKKAL
TTh 3:30-4:50 ARC 133
Geometry has always been part of designing and constructing buildings. In Islamic architecture, the role of geometry is manifested in numerous ways, several of which will be examined in this course. We will review two- and three-dimensional uses of symmetry, geometry, patterns, and proportion systems. We will also examine specific architectural features such as muqamas, star ribbed domes, surface decorations, the use of calligraphy in Islamic buildings. Some attention will be given to cultural, philosophical, and technical aspects of the use of geometry in the built environment throughout the Islamic world. Special emphasis will be given to the computational concepts and processes underlying geometric designs. Students will be using a new, simplified, graphics programming language, called FormWriter, throughout the course to generate two-and three-dimensional forms algorithmically without needing previous programming experience or having to write complex code.

ARCHEOLOGY

SLN: 1300
ARCHY 105 A ARCHY OF EGYPT (3 Cr) WENKE
MTWThF 10:30-11:20 JHN 123
A survey of ancient Egyptian culture history between about 6000 BC and AD 400, based on a synthesis of archaeological and textual evidence. Focuses on the origins and evolution of the Egyptian state and the elements of pharaonic religion, society, economy, art, architecture, and science.

ART HISTORY

SLN: 1400
ART H 201 AA SURVEY OF WESTERN ART-ANCIENT (5 Credits) HALLETT
Other Sections available
MWF 1:30-2:20 KNE 120
TTh 10:30-11:20 ART 006
The course provides an introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Near East, the Bronze Age Aegean cultures, ancient Greece, the Hellenistic world, Etruria, and the Roman Empire down to the coming of Christianity. It also offers some preliminary training in visual analysis and a practical introduction to the critical vocabulary of art history. The content of the course is provided chiefly by the lectures, supplemented by assigned readings from the class textbook. Students are also required to participate in a weekly discussion section, which will work through a series of exercises designed to complement the lectures. These exercises are assigned in advance, and each will necessitate one hour of preparation in the School of Art Media Center. Accordingly, one hour of study in the Media Center per week is a required part of the course.

SLN: 1414
ART H 309 YB TOPICS IN ART HISTORY (5 Credits) PLATT
MW 7:00-9:20pm ART 317
"CONTEMPORARY ART AROUND THE WORLD" Art in Turkey, China, India, Cuba, South Aftica, "Biennial" exhibitions (international exhibitions). Other countries time permitting. Class members are encouraged to bring their own knowledge of international art or other countries to share with class.

SLN: 1425
ART H 509 A SEMINAR SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART HISTORY (5 Credits) KURU
Grads Only
W 1:30-3:20 CMU 326
“IMPERIAL REFLECTIONS: OTTOMAN CULTURAL LEGACY
The main purpose of this seminar is a critical review of the scholarly works on Ottoman art and art history in order to contextualize and problematize the Ottoman cultural legacy. The seminar will focus on the historical development of Ottoman architecture, calligraphy, miniature painting, book production, and text composition, and the way they function in Ottoman society.

SLN: 1427
ART H 551 A SEM IN EARLY CHRIS/MEDIEVAL ART (5 Credits) KARTSONIS
w/EURO 498 E
M 2:30 ART 312
The seminar will examine important examples of Byzantine monumental decoration from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries as known to us by surviving monuments and written sources. The interrelation of the selected systems of decoration will be examined in the context of the historical, political, religious, and aesthetic considerations that influenced their selection, and disposition within the architecture that housed them. Moreover, attention will be paid to the interpretation by the patrons who commissioned these programs, and the audiences that brought them to life in the context of the related rituals that defined and enhanced all Early Christian and Byzantine monumental decoration. Special emphasis will be placed on monuments in Italy to the 1999 Art History Seminar in Rome.

COMPARATIVE RELIGION

SLN: 6725
RELIG 426 A GNOSTICISM (5 Credits) WILLIAMS
MTWTh 10:30-11:20 THO 135
Gnosticism and Early Christianity
Impact of Gnosticism on the development of Christianity and several other religious groups of that period. Readings dating from the first through the third centuries AD. Certain forms of religious expression from the early centuries of Christianity were eventually condemned by "orthodox" Christian authorities as "heretical." Among the earliest and most interesting of these were a variety of writers and movements who considered the creator God of biblical tradition to be a "lesser god," inferior to a far more transcendent and sublime divine entity. Original writings from such movements are preserved among the works in the important "Nag Hammadi Library," a collection of writings (gospels, revelations, treatises, etc.) discovered in the later 1940's near the Egyptian village of Nag Hammadi, and we will give special attention to this collection and related sources from the period. These often contain interesting and sometimes rather elaborate mythologies about the origin of the world, the nature of the true God and the lesser god(s) of creation, the origin of evil, and the nature and destiny of humanity. At a time when there was still no fixed Christian Bible or uniform organization, such elaborate myths of origin and eschatology constituted some of the earliest attempts at a systematic articulation of Christian doctrine in relation to Jewish tradition and Greco-Roman philosophy. The Nag Hammadi collection includes other writings that do not necessarily-or at least so clearly-involve these mythologies but do exemplify interesting "alternative" Christian literatures claiming to convey "secret" revelation of one sort or another. Fundamental features of what eventually became Christian orthodoxy were shaped through controversy over such doctrines and literatures.

SLN: 8499
RELIG 434 A HUMAN RIGHTS & ISLAM (3 Cr) SOUAIAIA
Offered with SISME 434 A
TTh: 2:30-3:50 SMI 120 (SEE SISME 434 for course description)

SLN: 6726
RELIG 432 A RITUAL/LAW IN ISLAM (5 Credits) B. WHEELER
w/NEAR E 432 A
MWF 1:30-2:50 DEN 216
Comparative study of Islamic ritual practices and related development of jurisprudence and law. Focus on sacrifice, political and social legal theory, pilgrimage, regulation of the body, and the diversity of contemporary practices. In English.

ANCIENT & MEDIEVAL HISTORY

SLN: 4109
HSTAM 403 A ALEX THE GREAT & THE HELNSTC AGE (5 Credits) THOMAS
MWF 11:30-12:50 ART 003
Rise of Macedonia, conquest of Near East by Alexander, and division into lesser kingdoms after Alexander's death. Special emphasis on fusion of cultures and change from city-state to world-state.

HISTORY

SLN: 3974
HIST 463 A MIDDLE EAST SINCE 1789 (5 Credits) HEINRICHS
MTW 1:30-3:20 DEN 315
The cultural, intellectual, political, and social forces that affect change in the modern Middle East. A sense of the Islamic world views, how they shape the responses by Middle Easterners to the pressures of modernization and globalization. There will be lectures, occasional videos, Socratic-style discussions, and discussion groups.

HUMANITIES

SLN: 4167
HUM 596 B HUMANITIES RESEARCH SEMINAR (3 Credits) KURU
w/SISME 590 A
W 1:30-2:50 CMU 326
"IMPERIAL REFLECTIONS: OTTOMAN CULTURE LEGACY" (SEE SISME 590 A for Course Description)

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

SLN: 6817
SIS 406 YA POLITICAL ISLAM (5 Credits) BURROWES
w/POL S 432 YA
TTh 5:30-7:50 CMU 228
Political Islam and Islamic Fundamentalism
Study of resurgence, since mid-1970s, of political Islam and what has come to be called Islamic fundamentalism, especially in the Middle East. Topics include the nature and variety of political Islam today, causes and implications of the current resurgence, and comparison with previous resurgences. Offered: jointly with POL S 432. Course focuses on the revival since the mid-1970s of political Islam and what has come to be called "Islamic fundamentalism," especially in the Middle East. What are the nature and variety of political Islam today, and how does this resurgence or revival compare to those in the past? What are its causes, and what are its implications for the Islamic world as well as for the rest of the world, the U.S. included? (For example, is it a "threat" to us and our interests?) Finally, is political Islam compatible with democratic politics and international order?

SLN: 6821
SIS 460 A LAW, STATE & SOCIETY(5 Credits) WOODS
TTh 3:30-5:20 THO 235
The seminar will address the role of law and judiciaries in state-society relations in a number of cases around the world, from Brazil to India to China, with a focus on the Middle East and the U.S. It will focus on questions of judicialization of politics (including contests over power between judiciaries and other state institutions), and legal mobilization among a variety of social and political actors.
The course will focus on the development of analytical reading, writing, and speaking skills through daily assignments, presentations, and papers. Response papers will address the central argument(s) in the readings. Term Paper: Students will present research papers on specific court cases or countries not covered in class, analyzing the intersection among law, state, and society in that case.

SLN: 6827
SIS 498 C READINGS IN INTERNL STUDIES (5 Credits) WATTS
Add code required “The Politics of Human Rights”
T 1:30-3:20 THO 231

JEWISH STUDIES

SLN: 6869
SISJE 490 B SPEC TOPICS: INTRO TO TALMUD (3 Credits) GAMORAN
MW 11:30-12:50 DEN 314
No other work reflects the thought and practice of the Jewish people in late antiquity as does the Talmud. The Talmud is a book of law, but it is more. It is a book of logic and reason, of religion and ethics, of business and family relations. It deals with picayune matters and with profound issues. This course will explore the Talmud's laws concerning renting apartments, conflicting claims between neighbors and disputes between individuals and the community. We will also investigate how the Talmud was created and edited and what are its main literary characteristics. The text used in this three credit course will be an English translation of the Talmud. Two additional credits (HEBR 490) will be offered to those students who come an extra hour during the week to study the text in its original languages, Hebrew and Aramaic.

SLN: 6871
SISJE 490 D SPEC TOPICS: MOD HEBR LIT IN ENGL (3 Credits) SOKOLOFF
w/NEAR E 325 A
MW 1:30-2:50 PAR 212
How imaginative literature (fiction, poetry, and essays) illuminate the role of women in Israeli society. Small lecture/Discussion
 
MUSIC

SLN: 5362
MUSIC 512 A SEMINAR IN ETHNOMUSICOLOGY (3 Credits) ELLINGSON
ADD CODE REQUIRED (PD.3)
MUSIC,ETHNOM,SIS,SISME,SISRE,SISSA
ETHNOMUSICOLOGY & FILM
Th 2:30-5:00 MUS 058

SLN: 5189
MUSAP 589 B WORLD MUSIC LAB (Credit/no credit) MUNIR BEKEN
GRADS ONLY
$100 fee required
TO BE ARRANGED
UD & TURKISH ENSEMBLE
MUSAP 589 B - applied music (that is, performance) course. Essentially that means private lessons on a given instrument. Munir specializes in ud, but also teaches tanbur, voice, percussion, etc.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

SLN: 6373
POL S 407 YA INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT (5 Credits) MERCER
MW 4:30-6:50 SAV 313
Many forms of international conflict, including global wars, local wars, anti-regime wars, military interventions, and international crises. Several political, social, and anthropological explanations for conflicts and examination of alternative world futures. This course examines the causes of war by focusing on the individual, state, and international levels of analysis. It explores the usefulness and limitations of deterrence theory. Special attention will be paid to nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. The course also examines a range of issues from the utility of economic sanctions to the desirability of developing non-lethal weapons.

SLN: 6376
POL S 431 A MIDDLE EAST (5 Credits) BURROWES
TTh 1:30-3:20 JHN 064
International Relations in the Middle East
Study of domestic sources of foreign policy in the Middle East; politics of oil; the East-West rivalry in the arena; and conflict and collaboration among the local powers. Description. This course focuses on a number of interrelated themes: Great Power involvement in the Middle East (imperialism, the Cold War and its end, etc.); Arab-Israeli conflict and “the peace process”; inter-Arab conflict and cooperation; the external relations of Turkey and Iran; and the politics of oil and of “Islamic fundamentalism.” How are these themes related to one another and do they add up to a definable Middle East subsystem of the international system? What are the linkages between the domestic politics and external relations of states in the region? Emphasis is on the period from World War II to the present, especially the past decade, but this period will be related to the century that preceded it. Texts. Required texts are: T. Ismael, International Relations of the Middle East; I. Ibrahim, (ed.), The Gulf Crisis: Background and Consequences; and R. Freedman, (ed.), The Middle East and the Peace Process.

SLN: 6377
POL S 432 YA POLITICAL ISLAM (5 Credits) BURROWES
OFFERED JOINTLY WITH SIS 406 YA
TTh 5:30-7:50 CMU 228
Political Islam and Islamic Fundamentalism
Study of resurgence, since mid-1970s of political Islam and what has come to be called Islamic fundamentalism, especially in the Middle East. Topics include the nature and variety of political Islam today, causes and implications of the current resurgence, and comparison with previous resurgences. Offered: jointly with SIS 406. Description. This course focuses on the revival since the mid-1970s of political Islam and what has come to be called "Islamic fundamentalism," especially in the Middle East. What is the nature and variety of political Islam today, and how does this resurgence compare to those in the past? What are its causes, and what are its implications for the Islamic world as well as for the rest of the world, the U.S. included? (For example, is it a "threat" to us and our interests?) What can be said about the compatibility of political Islam and democratic politics? What are the truth and implications of the assertion that "not all Islamic revivalists are Islamic fundamentalists, and not all Islamic fundamentalists are political activists, and not all Islamic political activists are radical and prone to violence?" There are no prerequisites, although a basic course on Middle East politics, history, etc., is a good idea. Suitable for non-majors with some background in political science. Texts. J. Esposito, The Islamic Threat: Myth or Reality?; J. Beinin and J. Stork (eds), Political Islam; and J. Espositio and J. Voll, Islam and Democracy.

WOMEN STUDIES

SLN: 7526
WOMEN 490 A SPEC TOP: ISLAM & GENDER(3 Credits) HOLMES-EBER
Offered jointly with sisme 490 A
Add code required (PD 3)
TTh 11:30-12:50 THO 211 (SEE SISME 490 A for Course Description)

NEAR EASTERN COURSES
(for Information Call Near East Dept. - 543-6033)

NEAR E 325 A w/SISJE 490 D SLN: 5435 Modern Hebr Lit in English SOKOLOFF 3 MW 1:30-2:50 PAR 212

Major developments in Hebrew literature from the Enlightenment to the current Israeli literature. Examines the development of modern Hebrew thought and literary style.

NEAR E 403 A SLN: 5436 Mod Arabic Novel Colonialism, Nationalism and the Modern Arabic Novel DEYOUNG 3 TTh 1:30-2:50 PAR 306

Examines how representative novels from the modern canon in Arabic have both endorsed and critiqued aspects of nationalism and colonialist ideology. Recommended: NEAR E 210.

NEAR E 423 A SLN: 5437 Persian Lit in Trans KARIMI-HAKKA 3 MF 1:30-2:50 SWS B010

Designed to familiarize students with an expanding collection of works translated from Persian literature, both classical and modern, into English. Focuses on a few representative texts and offers interpretations of the culture through close readings. Prior acquaintance with Iranian culture not required.

NEAR E 432 A SLN: 5438 w/NEAR E 525 AA Ritual/Law in Islam Islamic Law WHEELER 5 MWF 1:30-2:50 DEN 216

Comparative study of Islamic ritual practices and related development of jurisprudence and law. Focus on sacrifice, political and social legal theory, pilgrimage, regulation of the body, and the diversity of contemporary practices. In English.

NEAR E 434 A SLN: 5439 Human Rights & Islam SOUAIAIA 3 TTh 2:30-3:50

Focuses primarily on the historical and philosophical background behind the development of the principles and norms of "human rights" in Western thought and in the Islamic legal and religious traditions, from the seventh century to modern day. Analyzes the role of religious as well as political, social, and economic institutions in formulating the notions of human rights.

NEAR E 496 A SLN: 5441 w/NEAR E 596 A (Grads only) Special Studies “Kazakh-Kirghiz Studies” CIRTAUTAS 3 Th 2:30-3:50 DEN 217

“KAZAKH-KIRGHIZ STUDIES" Reading of selected texts in modern literary Kazakh, with continuing emphasis on grammar, syntax and oral practice. Prerequisite: 317 or equivalent

NEAR E 525 AA w/RELIG 432 A SLN: 5443 Islam Institutions “Islamic Law” WHEELER, B 3 MWF 1:30-2:50 DEN 216 W 3:00-3:50 DEN 302

Islamic institutions of the caliphate, the sultanate, the bureaucracy, taxation, mosques, and madrasahs, as well as theories of government.

NEAR E 490 A SLN: 5440 Supervised Study FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 499 A SLN: 5442 Undergrad Research FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 600 A SLN: 5445 Independent Study/Research (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

NEAR EASTERN LANGUAGE COURSES
(for Information Call Near East Dept. - 543-6033)

ARAB
ARAB 413 AA SLN: 1247 ELEMENTARY ARABIC SOUAIAIA ALI 5 TTh 12:30-1:20 DEN 211 MWF 12:30-1:20 DEN 216
ARAB 413 AB SLN: 1248 ELEMENTARY ARABIC SOUAIAIA ALI 5 TTh 12:30-1:20 DEN 211 MWF 9:30-10:20 PAR 305

Study of grammar, with oral and written drill and reading of simple texts. (Cannot be taken for credit if 401 taken.) Prerequisite: ARAB 412.

ARAB 423 A SLN: 1249 INTERMED ARABIC SOUAIAIA 5 MTWThF 11:30-12:20 PAR 120

Reading of selected texts in standard Arabic, with continuing emphasis on grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: ARAB 422

ARAB 433 A SLN: 1250 ADVANCED ARABIC DEYOUNG 3 TTh 10:30-11:50 SWS B012

Focus on Arabic at the advanced level through in-depth examination of grammar, reading of selected texts, and brief surveys of some major reference materials. Prerequisite: ARAB 431.

ARAB 455 A SLN: 1251 Ritual/Legal Texts WHEELER, B 3 MW 10:30-11:50 DEN 217

Selected readings from well-known Islamic legal texts (furu al-fiqh) with attention to the sources of the law and methods of exegesis (usul al-fiqh). Prerequisite: ARAB 432.

ARAB 490 A SLN: 1252 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 499 A SLN: 1253 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
ARAB 600 A SLN: 1254 INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

EGYPT

EGYPT 423 A SLN: 2992 READINGS IN COPTIC WILLIAMS 3 TTh 8:00-9:30 DEN 213

Readings from ancient Coptic Christian literature, with emphasis on the Nag Hammadi texts. Prerequisite: COPTC 411 or EGYPT 411

HEBREW

HEBR 413 A SLN: 3937 ELEM MODERN HEBREW SHIHADE 5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20 ART 004

Modern Israeli Hebrew. Core vocabulary, grammar, conversational text, and oral and written communication. Excerpts from modern Hebrew prose and poetry. (Cannot be taken for credit if 401 taken.) Prerequisite: HEBR 411

HEBR 423 A SLN: 3938 INTERMED MOD HEBREW SOKOLOFF 5 MTWThF 10:30-11:20 DEN 314

Readings of selected texts in modern Hebrew with continuing emphasis on grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: HEBR 422.

HEBR 426 A SLN: 3939 BIBLICAL HEBREW PROSE NOEGEL 5 TTh 10:30-12:20

Explores select prose sections of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) in conjunction with English translations and commentaries. Emphasis on close readings, the grammatical insights of textual criticism, and the interpretive strategies and agendas of the English translations. Prerequisite: HEBR 332 or 415.

HEBR 451 A SLN: 4075 INTRO TO HEBREW LIT SOKOLOFF 3 MWF 11:30-12:20 DEN 213

Literary texts and analysis. Grammar, composition, and dictionary skills. Primarily modern texts-short poetry, fiction, and essays-with some selections as well from biblical passages, the liturgy, midrash, and medieval poetry. Prerequisite: HEBR 423.

HEBR 490 A SLN: 3940 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 499 A SLN: 3941 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
HEBR 600 A SLN: 3942 INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

PERSIAN

PRSAN 413 A SLN: 6427 ELEMENTARY PERSIAN KARIMI-HAKKAK, BARLAS 5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20 ARC 025

Conversation, pronunciation, and graded reading. Persian alphabet and basic sentence constructions. Offers rudimentary conversational and reading ability with a vocabulary of about two thousand words. Prerequisite: PRSAN 412.

PRSAN 423 A SLN: 6428 INTERMED PERSIAN KARIMI-HAKKAK, BARLAS 5 MTWThF 10:30-11:20 GLD 317

Reading of simple texts with emphasis on reading and writing, conversation skills, grammar, and syntax. Builds a vocabulary of standard Persian in preparation for advanced reading and comprehension of literary texts. Prerequisite: PRSAN 422.

PRSAN 490 A SLN: 6429 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 499 A SLN: 6430 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
PRSAN 600 A SLN: 6431 INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

TURKIC

TKIC 413 A SLN: 7446 ELEMENTARY UZBEK CIRTAUTAS 5 TO BE ARRANGED

Introduction to the modern written and spoken language. Cannot be taken for credit if 401 taken.

TKIC 456 A SLN: 7447 INTRO UZBEK LIT CIRTAUTAS 3 TO BE ARRANGED

Readings from selected Uzbek writers.

TKIC 547 A SLN: 7450 OLD UIGHUR CIRTAUTAS 3 TO BE ARRANGED  
TKIC 490 A SLN: 7448 SUPERVISED STUDY   FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 499 A SLN: 7449 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH   FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKIC 600 A SLN: 7451 INDEPNDNT STDY/RESEACH (Grads only)   FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

TURKISH

TKISH 413 A SLN: 7452 ELEMENTARY TURKISH KURU HAVLIOGLU 5 MTWThF 9:30-10:20 ART 006

Introduction to modern Turkish. Pronunciation and conversation, grammar and composition, graded reading. Latin characters used throughout. (Cannot be taken for credit if TKISH 401 is taken.)

TKISH 423 A SLN: 7453 INTERMED TURKISH KURU HAVLIOGLU 5 MTWThF 10:30-11:20 GLD 436

Introduction to modern Turkish literature. Prerequisite: TKISH 422.

TKISH 490 A SLN: 7454 SUPERVISED STUDY FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 499 A SLN: 7455 UNDERGRAD RESEARCH FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-6 TO BE ARRANGED
TKISH 600 A SLN: 7456 INDEPNDNT STDY/RSCH (Grads only) FACULTY CODE: DEN 229. 1-10 TO BE ARRANGED

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The Middle East Center
University of Washington
225 Thomson Hall
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-4227 phone
(206) 685-0668 fax
mecuw@u.washington.edu

Ellis Goldberg, Director
goldberg@uw.edu

Felicia Hecker, Associate Director
fhecker@uw.edu