MIDDLE EAST STUDIES PROGRAM

COURSE OFFERINGS
SUMMER QUARTER 2000

MIDDLE EAST STUDIES

INDEPENDENT STUDY (Var credits)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111
TO BE ARRANGED
SISME 600/SLN: 3556

MASTERS THESIS (Var credits)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. THO 111
TO BE ARRANGED
SISME 700/SLN: 3557

ART HISTORY

EARLY MED & BYZANT (5 Cr)
PROFESSOR: A. Kartsonis
MTWThF: 12:30-2:40, ART 317
ART H 351 A Term B /SLN: 1172
Christian art and architecture of the Roman and Byzantine empires and of western Europe through the eighth century.
The class will explore the changing artistic traditions of the Early Christian and Byzantine periods from the reign of Constantine the Great (312) to the fall of Constantinople (1453)). Emphasis will be placed on the historical, social, political, and religious factors that determined the visual and artistic expression of the sophisticated civilization of Byzantium.

COMPARATIVE RELIGION

INTRO NEW TESTAMENT (5 Cr)
PROFESSOR: M. Williams
MTWThF 12:00-2:10, THO 235
RELIG 220 A, Term A/SLN: 3491
Modern scholarly methods of research and analysis in dealing with New Testament books and their interpretation. Genres of various books (gospel, epistle, sacred history, apocalypse); problems of the relationships among author, material, and intended audience; relationships between theme and image. The students will be introduced to modern critical study of the New Testament (=NT). Though now often spoken of in the singular, as a unified document, the NT is actually a collection of what were originally individual writings composed by various early Christians over a period of many years. What is now a standardized collection took shape over several generations. This course is concerned with understanding the NT writings in their original historical settings. Students learn some of the possible circumstances and purposes for the composition of individual writings; what can be known about the authors; key themes found in various writings, and the background for these; interrelationships among NT writings, and their significance; and in general, the relation between these writings and what can be known about the social history and culture of earliest Christian movements.

HEBREW BIBLE (5 Cr)
PROFESSOR: S. Noegel
MTWThF 940-1150 SAV 249
RELIG 240 A, Term A/SLN: 3492
Offered jointly w/NEAR E 240 A
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible in English. Results of modern critical studies on the Bible and the ancient Near East. Concentrates on the meaning of Biblical records in their own time and environment. General understanding of the biblical text. (lectures)

WOMEN IN THE BIBLE (Special Topics) (5 Cr)
INSTRUCTOR: K. Winslow
MTWThF 940-1150 SAV 249
RELIG 490 A, Term A/SLN: 3494
Offered jointly w/NEAR E 496

HISTORY

THE ANCIENT WORLD (5 Cr)
INSTRUCTOR: A. Ferrill
MTWThF: 9:40-10:40, SMI 211
HIST 111 A/SLN: 2142
Origins of Western civilization to the fall of Rome.
A history of Western Civilization from prehistoric times to fall of the Roman Empire. (Lecture)

MIDDLE EAST SINCE 1789 (5 Cr)
INSTRUCTOR: A. Igmen
MTWThF: 8:30-9:30, SMI 404
HIST 463 A/SLN: 2148
Critical issues and themes in the changing Middle East, including Westernization, growth of nationalism, Arab-Israeli dispute, Iranian revolution, and the role of Islam.

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

POLITICAL ISLAM (5 credits)
PROFESSOR: R. Burrowes
MTWThF: 10:50-1:00, SMI 407
SIS 406 A, Term A/SLN: 3532
Offered jointly w/POL l S 432 A/SLN 3316
Study of resurgence, since mid-1970s, of political Islam and what has come to be called Islamic fundamentalism, especially in the Middle East. Topics include the nature and variety of political Islam today, causes and implications of the current resurgence, and comparison with previous resurgences. Offered: jointly with POL S 432. Course focuses on the revival since the mid-1970s of political Islam and what has come to be called "Islamic fundamentalism," especially in the Middle East. What are the nature and variety of political Islam today, and how does this resurgence or revival compare to those in the past? What are its causes, and what are its implications for the Islamic world as well as for the rest of the world, the U.S. included? (For example, is it a "threat" to us and our interests?) Finally, is political Islam compatible with democratic politics and international order?

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLITICAL ISLAM (5 Cr)
PROFESSOR: R. Burrowes
MTWThF: 10:50-1:00, SMI 407
POL S 432 A, Term A/SLN: 3316
Offered jointly with SIS 406 A/SLN 3532
Study of resurgence, since mid-1970s, of political Islam and what has come to be called Islamic fundamentalism, especially in the Middle East. Topics include the nature and variety of political Islam today, causes and implications of the current resurgence, and comparison with previous resurgences. Offered: jointly with POL S 432. Course focuses on the revival since the mid-1970s of political Islam and what has come to be called "Islamic fundamentalism," especially in the Middle East. What are the nature and variety of political Islam today, and how does this resurgence or revival compare to those in the past? What are its causes, and what are its implications for the Islamic world as well as for the rest of the world, the U.S. included? (For example, is it a "threat" to us and our interests?) Finally, is political Islam compatible with democratic politics and international order?

NEAR EASTERN INTENSIVE LANGUAGE COURSES
(For Information Call (206) 543-2320)

ARABIC

Intensive Elementary Arabic (15 credits)
Instructor: TBA
Daily: 8:30-11:50am,
ARAB 401/SLN: 1089
Study of grammar, with oral and written drill and reading of simple texts. (Cannot be taken for credit if 411, 412, 413 taken.)

MODERN HEBREW
Intensive Elementary Hebrew (15 credits)
Instructor: TBA
MTWThF: 8:30-11:50
HEBR 401/SLN: 2137
Intensive study of grammar, with oral and written drill and reading of simple texts. (Cannot be taken for credit if 411, 412, 413 taken.)

UZBEK

Intensive Intermediate Uzbek (15 credits)
PROFESSOR: I Cirtautas (icirt@u.washington.edu)
Kochumkulova
MTWThF: 8:00-11:50, SWS 125
TKIC 404 A/SLN: 3810
Because this course requires 20 contact hours, students must also register for 5 credits of NEAR E 590. The department is applying for a grant that could provide some fellowship support for this course. For further information contact Professor Ilse Cirtautas (icirt@u.washington.edu).)
Allows students to complete second year Uzbek in one quarter. Reading of selected texts in Uzbek, with continuing emphasis on oral and written practice, grammar, and advanced readings. Cannot be taken for credit if 421, 422, 423 taken. Prerequisite: either TKIC 401 or TKIC 413.

COURSES ON RELIGION, CULTURE AND SOCIETY

NEAR EASTERN COURSES IN ENGLISH
(for Information Call Near East Dept. - 543-6033)
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible: Old Testament(5 credits)
PROFESSOR: S. Noegel
MTWThF: 9:40-11:50, SAV 249
NEAR E 240 A/SLN: 2822
Term A only (June 19-July 19)
Introduction to the Hebrew Bible in English. Results of modern critical studies on the Bible and the ancient Near East. Concentrates on the meaning of Biblical records in their own time and environment. Offered jointly with RELIG 240 A.

TURKIC CULTURES OF CENTRAL ASIA (Special Studies) (3-5 credits))
PROFESSOR: I. Cirtautas
To Be Arranged
NEAR E 496 A, Term B/SLN: 2824
Offered jointly w/NEAR E 596 A
History of the Turkic peoples, CE 552 to present. Emphasis on current status of Turkic peoples in Central Asia. Geographic distribution, demographic data, reactions and adaptations to changes resulting from the 1917 revolution. Turkic viewpoint on past and present developments.

NARRATIVE, HISTORY AND THE TURKISH AUTHOR (Special Studies) (3-5 credits))
INSTRUCTOR: E. Goknar
TTh: 1:10-2:50, BLM 308
NEAR E 496 B, Term B/SLN: 2824
Offered jointly w/NEAR E 596 B
An introduction to important aspects of 20th century Turkish history through English translations of two prominent contemporary Turkish writers: Adalet Agaoglu and Orhan Pamuk. Knowledge of Turkish is not required.

WOMEN IN THE BIBLE (Special Studies) (5 credits)
INSTRUCTOR: K. Winslow
MTWThF: 9:40-11:50, SAV 243
NEAR E 496 C/SLN: 2826
Term A only (June 19-July 19)
An examination of women characters portrayed in the narratives of the Hebrew Bible, and an analysis of the gender constructions represented in law codes and other genres of early Jewish texts. This course will also consider how insider/outsider motifs are created, especially as these
relate to marriage. Offered jointly with RELIG 490A.

SUPERVISED STUDY (Var credits)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 490 A/SLN: 2823

UNDERGRAD RESEARCH (Var credits)
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 499 A/SLN: 2827

INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEACH (Var credits)
GRADS ONLY
INSTRUCTOR I.D. DEN 229
TO BE ARRANGED
NEAR E 600 A/SLN: 2830

For information about registration, etc., one can call (206) 543-2320, or (outside Seattle) 1-800-543-2320, or visit www.summer.washington.edu.

All summer students pay in-state tuition fees for summer courses. Tuition this summer will be $1,173 for a full-time undergraduate (10 credits or more) and $1,821 for a full-time graduate student. There is an additional $35 application fee. Fees are subject to change.

Return to Quarterly Courses page

The Middle East Center
University of Washington
225 Thomson Hall
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
(206) 543-4227 phone
(206) 685-0668 fax
mecuw@u.washington.edu

Ellis Goldberg, Director
goldberg@uw.edu

Felicia Hecker, Associate Director
fhecker@uw.edu