Jackson School Ph.D. Program

 

Doctoral Faculty
 

For supervision of their doctoral dissertations, doctoral students should first look to the Jackson School faculty who generally work under some aspects of the four foundational fields in the JSIS Ph.D. Program. To aid them in this task, this appendix lists the core JSIS faculty by the Four Foundational Fields, highlighting some of their key works. Students are also advised to seek out additional information on the teaching and research interests of these faculty by examining their affiliations with current JSIS Academic Programs.

Further information on faculty members can also be found through their individual curricular vitae, shortened versions of which are available online at http://jsis.washington.edu/faculty/.

 

Faculty by Foundational Field

Religions, Cultures and Civilizations

States, Markets & Societies

Peace, Violence & Security

Law, Rights & Governance


 

Religions, Cultures, and Civilizations (RCC)


This field exposes students to the diversity of cultural and religious life anchored in concrete studies of world areas, histories, cultural and political movements, as well as religious institutions and practices. The main faculty members in this field include the following:

David Bachman is Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. He was chair of the China Studies Program from 1992-2003 and Associate Director of the Jackson School from 2000-2001 and 2003-2010. His research and teaching interests are Chinese Domestic and Foreign Policy, International Political Economy, Asian Politics, , International Relations, and U.S. - China Relations. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS, PVS, and LRG fields. 

• Bachman, David and Yang Dali (eds. and trans.). Yan Jiaqi and China's Struggle for Democracy (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1991)
• Bachman, David. Bureaucracy, Economy, and Leadership: The Institutional Origins of the Great Leap Forward (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991)
• Bachman, David. Chen Yun and the Chinese Political System (Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, 1985)
 

Sara Curran is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. She holds a joint appointment as the Associate Professor at the Evans School of Public Affairs, is Associate Director at the Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, and holds adjunct Associate Professor positions in the Department of Global Health and the Department of Sociology. Curran researches migration, globalization, gender, climate change and adaptation, and development. Curran employs a variety of research techniques, including qualitative field work, survey field work, regression modeling, mixed methods, and spatial and network analyses. Her research interests are in the RCC, SMS, and LRG fields.

• Curran, Sara, April Linton, Abigail Cooke and Andrew Schrank (eds.) The Global Governance of Food (London: Routledge, 2009)
 

Madeleine Yue Dong is Professor in the History Department and the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Chair of the China Studies program. Her research on Modern Chinese history focuses on social/cultural history, urban history, and gender history. Her research interests are in the RCC field.

• Dong, Madeline Yue (ed.). Major Western Scholarship on Chinese History, Vol. on Modern Chinese History (Shanghai: Guji Chubanshe, 2010)
• Dong, Madeline Yue, Tani Barlow, Uta Poiger, Priti Ramamurthy, Lynn Thomas, Alys Weinbaum. The Modern Girl Around the World: Consumption, Modernity and Globalization. (Durham: Duke University Press, 2009)
• Dong, Madeline Yue and Joshua Goldstein (eds.). Everyday Modernity in China (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2006)
• Dong, Madeline Yue. Republican Beijing: The City and Its Histories, 1911-1937 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003)
 

Kathie Friedman is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. She is also an adjunct Associate Professor in the departments of Sociology and Women Studies, and is affiliated with the Interdisciplinary PhD program in Near and Middle East Studies, the Jewish Studies Program, and the African Studies Program. Her course topics Comparative Immigration Studies, Forced Migrations, Global Diasporas, and Jewish American Women and Social Change. Her research interests are in the RCC, PVS and LRG fields.

• Friedman, Kathie. Memories of Migration: Gender, Ethnicity, and Work in the Lives of Jewish and Italian Women, New York 1870-1924 (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996)
• Friedman, Kathie, Joan Smith, Immanuel Wallerstein et al. Creating and Transforming Households: The Constraints of the World-Economy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992)


María Elena García is Associate Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and in the Comparative History of Ideas at the University of Washington. Her research and teaching focuses on human-animal relations, Indigenous politics, and violence in Latin America. Her research interests are in the RCC field.

• García, Marîa Elena. Making Indigenous Citizens: Identity, Development, and Multicultural Activism in Peru (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2005)

 

Christoph Giebel is Associate Professor of International Studies and History. His research and teaching interests concern 20th c. Viet Nam; comparative colonialism and (French and US) imperialism in (Southeast) Asia; history, historiography, and memory; and the spatial representations of the wars in Viet Nam. His research interests are in the RCC field.

• Giebel, Christoph. Imagined Ancestries of Vietnamese Communism: Ton Duc Thang and the Politics of History and Memory (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2004)

 

Gary Hamilton (ex officio) is the Associate Director of the Jackson School. He is the Henry M. Jackson Professor of International Studies. He also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Sociology. His research and teaching interests are in the RCC and SMS fields, with an area focus on Chinese societies and East Asian societies and economies.

• Hamilton, Gary, Misha Petrovic and Benjamin Senaur (eds.).The Market Makers: How Retailers Have Changed the Global Economy (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012)
• Hamilton, Gary and Robert C. Feenstra. Emergent Economies, Divergent Paths: Economic Organization and International Trade in South Korea and Taiwan (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006)
• Hamilton, Gary. Commerce and Capitalism in Chinese Societies. (London: Routledge, 2006)
• Hamilton, Gary (ed.). Cosmopolitan Capitalists: Hong Kong and the Chinese Diaspora at the end of the 20th Century (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1999)
Hamilton, Gary, Marco Orrù and Nicole Biggart. The Economic Organization of East Asian Capitalism (Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 1997)
• Hamilton, Gary and Wang Zheng. From the Soil: The Foundation of Chinese Society. A translation of Fei Xiaotong's Xiangtu Zhongguo, with Introduction and Epilogue (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992)
• Hamilton, Gary (ed.). Business Networks and Economic Development in East and Southeast Asia (Hong Kong: Centre of Asian Studies, 1991)
• Hamilton, Gary, Chang Wei-an, Jai Ben-ray, and Chen Chieh-hsuan (eds. and trans.). Zhongguo shehui yu jingji (Chinese Society and Economy). (Taipei: Lien-ching, 1990) [Chinese]
• Hamilton, Gary and Nicole Biggart. Governor Reagan, Governor Brown: A Sociology of Executive Power. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984)
 

Reşat Kasaba (ex officio) is Director of the Jackson School. He is the Stanley D. Golub Professor of International Studies. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS, and PVS fields, with an area focus on the Middle East and Turkey.

• Kasaba, Resat. A Moveable Empire: Ottoman nomads, Migrants, and Refugees (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009)
• Kasaba, Resat (ed.). Cambridge History of Turkey, Vol. IV: Turkey in the Modern World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008)
• Kasaba, Resat. World, Empire, and Society: Essays on the Ottoman Empire (Istanbul: Kitap Yayınevi , 2005) [Turkish]
• Kasaba, Resat and Sibel Bozdoğan (eds.) Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1997)
• Kasaba, Resat, Ellis Goldberg and Joel Migdal Rules and Rights in the Middle East: Democracy, Law, and Society (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1993)
• Kasaba, Resat. Cities in the World-System (Edited) (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1991)
• Kasaba, Resat. The Ottoman Empire and the World-Economy: The Nineteenth Century (Albany: SUNY Press, 1988)
 

José Antonio Lucero is Associate Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and the Chair of the Latin American and Caribbean Studies program. Working across the fields of comparative political science and anthropology, Lucero is interested in the intersections of politics and culture, and the methods of historical institutionalism, cultural studies, and ethnography. His current research explore the cultural politics of extractive industries, Indigenous movements, and borders in the Andes and Meso-America. His research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields.

• Lucero, José Antonio. Struggles of Voice: The Politics of Indigenous Representation in the Andes (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. 2008)       • Donna Lee Van Cott,  José Antonio Lucero, and Dale Turner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous People's Politics (Oxford University Press, forthcoming) 

 

Hwasook Nam is the James B. Palais Endowed Associate Professor in Korea Studies at the Jackson School of International Studies and the Department of History. Her research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields and include labor, gender, and intellectual history of modern Korea.

• Nam, Hwasook. Building Ships, Building a Nation: Korea's Democratic Unionism under Park Chung Hee (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009)

 

Devin Naar is the Marsha & Jay Glazer Assistant Professor in Jewish Studies whose research focuses on Modern Jewish History, Sephardic Jewry, Ottoman Empire and Greece, Transnational Studies, and Urban History. His research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields. 

 

Christian Lee Novetzke is Associate Professor in the South Asia Program, the Comparative Religion Program, and the International Studies Program at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies. Professor Novetzke teaches and writes about religion, history, and culture in South Asia, as well as theoretical issues in the study of religion in general and its intersection with historiography. He works in Marathi and Hindi materials, including textual, ethnographic, and visual/filmic sources and specializes in the study of Maharashtra over the second millennium CE to the present. His research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields.

• Novetzke, Christian lee. Religion and Public Memory: A Cultural History of Saint Namdev in India (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008)

 

Noam Pianko is Associate Professor and Samuel N. Stroum Chair of Jewish Studies in the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington. In addition, he serves as the chair of the University of Washington Jewish Studies program. His research seeks to help rethink deeply internalized assumptions about Jewish nationalism and its relationship to modern political, social, and cultural trends. His research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields.

• Pianko, Noam. Zionism and the Roads Not Taken: Rawidowicz, Kaplan, Kohn (The Modern Jewish Experience) (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2010)

 

Deborah Porter is Associate Professor at the Jackson School of International Studies in the China Studies Program. Her research interests are in the RCC field and include early China, cultural studies and psychoanalysis.

• Porter, Deborah. From Deluge to Discourse: Myth. History and the Generation of Chinese Fiction (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996)

 

Ken Pyle is the Henry M. Jackson Professor of History and Asian Studies and founding president of the National Bureau of Asian Research. Pyle is the author and editor of numerous books on modern Japan and its history and currently teaches courses on modern Japanese and international history. His research interests are in the RCC and PVS fields.

• Pyle, Kenneth. Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose (New York: PublicAffairs Books, 2007)
• Pyle, Kenneth and Hellman, Donald (eds.). From APEC to Xanadu: Creating a Viable Community in the Post-War Pacific (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1997)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The Japanese Question: Power and Purpose in a New Era (Washington, D.C.: AEI Press, Second edition, 1996)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The Making of Modern Japan, new (substantially enlarged) edition (Wilmington: Houghton Mifflin, 1996)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The Japanese Question: Power and Purpose in a New Era (Washington, D.C.: AEI Press, 1992)
• Pyle, Kenneth (ed.). The Trade Crisis: How Will Japan Respond? (Seattle: Society for Japanese Studies, 1987)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The Making of Modern Japan (Lexington: Heath, 1978)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The New Generation in Meiji Japan: Problems of Cultural Identity, 1885-1895 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1969)
 

Cabeiri Robinson is Associate Professor in the International Studies, Comparative Religions, and South Asian Studies programs. She is an adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropology and affiliated faculty with the Interdisciplinary Near and Middle East Program. Her research focuses on Political Islam, Political and Legal Anthropology, Historical Anthropology, Political Violence and Armed Conflict, Human Rights and Humanitarianism, Refugees Studies, and Comparative Muslim Societies. Her research interests are in the RCC, SMS and PVS fields.

• Robinson, Cabeiri. Body of the Victim, Body of the Warrior: Refugee Families and the Kashmir Jihad (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013)

 

Clark Sorenson is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Jackson School of International Studies and Director of the Center for Korea Studies. He has adjunct appointments in Anthropology and Women’s Studies, and is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Korean Studies. His research interests are in the RCC field.

• Sorenson, Clark, Yong-Chool Ha and Hong Yung Lee (eds.). Colonial Rule and Social Change in Korea, 1910-1945 (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2013)
• Sorenson, Clark and Hyung-A Kim (eds.). Reassessing the Park Chung Hee Era, 1961-1979: Development, Political Thought, Democracy, and Cultural Influence (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2011)
• Sorenson, Clark. Over the Mountains are Mountains: Korean Peasant Households and their Adaptations to Rapid Industrialization (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1988)
 

Jonathan Warren is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology. His teaching specializations include Education, Race, Ethnicity and Nationalism, Cultural Studies, and Qualitative Research Methods. His research interests are in the RCC field.

• Warren, Jonathan. Racial Revolutions: Antiracism and Indian Resurgence in Brazil (Durham: Duke University Press, 2001)

 

Jim Wellman is Professor and Chair of the Comparative Religion Program in the Jackson School of International Studies. Teaching at the University of Washington since 2002, his areas of expertise are in American religious culture, history, politics and its relationship to foreign policy and international studies. His research interests are in the RCC and PVS fields.

• Wellman, James K. Jr. Rob Bell and a New American Christianity (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2012)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. and Clark Lombardi (eds.). Religion and Human Security: Global Perspective (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. Evangelicals vs. Liberals: The Clash of Christian Cultures in the Pacific Northwest (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. Belief and Bloodshed: Religion and Violence across Time and Tradition (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. Gold Coast Church and the Ghetto: Christ and Culture in Mainline Protestantism (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 1999)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. and William H. Swatos, Jr. The Power of Religious Publics: Staking Claims in American Society (Westport: Praeger Publishers, 1999)
 

Michael Williams is Professor in the Comparative Religion Program at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization. He is a member of the Middle East Studies Program and Adjunct Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington. His research interests are in the RCC field.

• Williams, Michael. Rethinking "Gnosticism": An Argument for Dismantling a Problematic Category (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996)
• Williams, Michael, Collett Cox and Martin Jaffee (eds.). Innovation in Religious Traditions: Essays in the Interpretation of Religious Change, Religion and Society (Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 1992)
• Williams, Michael. 'The Immovable Race': A Gnostic Designation and the Theme of Stability in Late Antiquity (Leiden: Brill, 1985)
• Williams, Michael (trans. and assist. ed.) and Helmut Koester(ed.): Martin Dibelius, A Commentary on the Epistle of James (11th German edition by Heinrich Greeven) (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1975)
 

Anand Yang is the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor, International Studies; Director of the South Asia Center of the Jackson School of International Studies; and a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS and LRG fields, including two current book projects: coerced Indian labor in Southeast Asia, and Chinese and South Asian labor migrations across the globe in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

• Yang, Anand, Jerry Bentley and Renate Bridenthal. Interactions: Transregional Perspectives on World History (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2005)
• Yang, Anand. Bazaar India: Peasants, Traders, Markets and the Colonial State in Gangetic Bihar, 1765-1947 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998)
• Yang, Anand. The Limited Raj: Agrarian Relations in Colonial India, Saran District, 1793-1920 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989)
• Yang, Anand (ed.). Crime and Criminality in British India (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1986)
 

Glennys Young is a Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies in the Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian Studies program. She holds a joint appointment as Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington. Her research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields. Her past research has included work on religious activism in revolutionary Russia, the communist experience of the 20th century, and societal atheism in Soviet Russia.

 • Young, Glennys. The Communist Experience in the Twentieth Century: A Global History through Sources (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011)
• Young, Glennys and Reginald E. Zelnik (eds.). Perils of Pankratova: Some Stories from the Annals of Soviet Historiography (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2005)
• Young, Glennys. Power and the Sacred in Revolutionary Russia: Religious Activists in the Village (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997)

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States, Markets, and Societies (SMS)


This field exposes students to theoretical and empirical debates about the engagement of states with their societies and with transnational actors in their historical, political, and social settings. The main faculty members in this field include the following:

Marie Anchordoguy is Professor and Chair of the Japan Studies Program at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Professor Anchordoguy specializes in the political economy of Japan and her current research is on entrepreneurship in Japan. Her research interest is in the SMS field.

• Anchordoguy, Marie. Reprogramming Japan: The High Tech Crisis Under Communitarian Capitalism (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005)
• Anchordoguy, Marie. Computers Inc., Japan's Challenge to IBM (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1989)
 

David Bachman is Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. He was chair of the China Studies Program from 1992-2003 and Associate Director of the Jackson School from 2000-2001 and 2003-2010. His research and teaching interests are Chinese Domestic and Foreign Policy, International Political Economy, Asian Politics, , International Relations, and U.S. - China Relations. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS, PVS, and LRG fields.

• Bachman, David and Yang Dali (eds. and trans.). Yan Jiaqi and China's Struggle for Democracy (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1991)
• Bachman, David. Bureaucracy, Economy, and Leadership: The Institutional Origins of the Great Leap Forward (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991)
• Bachman, David. Chen Yun and the Chinese Political System (Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, 1985)

 

Mary Callahan is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Her research and teaching interests are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields for the Jackson School PhD program, with a particular emphasis on Political Reform in Post-Junta Constitutional Myanmar. Her research has also included Asian militaries in political reform processes, the history of peace negotiations in modern Myanmar, and civil-military relations in South East Asia.  

• Callahan, Mary. Political Authority in Burma’s Ethnic Minority States: Devolution, Occupation and Coexistence (Washington, D.C.: East-West Center, 2007)
• Callahan, Mary. Making Enemies: War and State Building in Burma (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003)
 

Sara Curran is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. She holds a joint appointment as the Associate Professor at the Evans School of Public Affairs, is Associate Director at the Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, and holds adjunct Associate Professor positions in the Department of Global Health and the Department of Sociology. Curran researches migration, globalization, gender, climate change and adaptation, and development. Curran employs a variety of research techniques, including qualitative field work, survey field work, regression modeling, mixed methods, and spatial and network analyses. Her research interests are in the RCC, SMS, and LRG fields.

• Curran, Sara, April Linton, Abigail Cooke and Andrew Schrank (eds.) The Global Governance of Food (London: Routledge, 2009)
 

Angelina Godoy is Helen H. Jackson Endowed Chair in Human Rights and Director at the Center for Human Rights at the University of Washington. She is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School, Associate Professor of Law, Societies, and Justice, and Adjunct Associate Professor of Sociology. A sociologist by training, her research focuses on human rights in Central and Latin America. Godoy teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in human rights in both the Law, Societies, and Justice program and in the Jackson School of International Studies. Her research interests are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields.

• Godoy, Angelina. Of Medicines and Markets: Intellectual Property and Human Rights in the Free Trade Era (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013)
• Godoy, Angelina. Popular Injustice: Violence, Community, and Law in Latin America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006)
 

Yong-Chool Ha is Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Social Science. His primary academic interests have been comparative politics and society with a particular focus on late coming nations (Korea, Japan, Prussia, China and the Soviet Union), Soviet and Russian politics, Russian Far East Korean domestic and international politics, inter-Korean Relations and East Asian regional politics and international theories in East Asia. His research interests are in the SMS and PVS fields.

• Ha, Yong-Chool , Hong Yung Lee and Clark Sorenson (eds.). Colonial Rule and Social Change in Korea, 1910-1945 (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2013)
• Ha, Yong-Chool. Russia’s Choice at the Crossroads (Seoul: Seoul National University Press, 2006)
• Ha, Yong-Chool (ed.) Journey to Siberia (Seoul: Dong-A-Ilbo-Sa, 2001).
• Ha, Yong-Chool, Stanislaw Gomulka and Cae-One Kim (eds.). Economic Reforms in the Socialist World (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1989)
 

Gary Hamilton (ex officio) is the Associate Director of the Jackson School. He is the Henry M. Jackson Professor of International Studies. He also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Sociology. His research and teaching interests are in the RCC and SMS fields, with an area focus on Chinese societies and East Asian societies and economies.

• Hamilton, Gary, Misha Petrovic and Benjamin Senaur (eds.).The Market Makers: How Retailers Have Changed the Global Economy (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012)
• Hamilton, Gary and Robert C. Feenstra. Emergent Economies, Divergent Paths: Economic Organization and International Trade in South Korea and Taiwan (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006)
• Hamilton, Gary. Commerce and Capitalism in Chinese Societies. (London: Routledge, 2006)
• Hamilton, Gary (ed.). Cosmopolitan Capitalists: Hong Kong and the Chinese Diaspora at the end of the 20th Century (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1999)
• Hamilton, Gary, Marco Orrù and Nicole Biggart. The Economic Organization of East Asian Capitalism (Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 1997)
• Hamilton, Gary and Wang Zheng. From the Soil: The Foundation of Chinese Society. A translation of Fei Xiaotong's Xiangtu Zhongguo, with Introduction and Epilogue (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992)
• Hamilton, Gary (ed.). Business Networks and Economic Development in East and Southeast Asia (Hong Kong: Centre of Asian Studies, 1991)
• Hamilton, Gary, Chang Wei-an, Jai Ben-ray, and Chen Chieh-hsuan (eds. and trans.). Zhongguo shehui yu jingji (Chinese Society and Economy). (Taipei: Lien-ching, 1990) [Chinese]
• Hamilton, Gary and Nicole Biggart. Governor Reagan, Governor Brown: A Sociology of Executive Power. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984)
 

Sunila S. Kale is Assistant Professor in the Jackson School of International Studies. Her teaching and research focus on Indian politics and political economy, South Asia, and the political economy of development. Her research interests are in the SMS field.

• Kale, Sunila. Electrifying India: Regional Political Economies of Development (forthcoming, Stanford University Press, 2014). 

 

Reşat Kasaba (ex officio) is Director of the Jackson School. He is the Stanley D. Golub Professor of International Studies. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS, and PVS fields, with an area focus on the Middle East and Turkey.

• Kasaba, Resat. A Moveable Empire: Ottoman nomads, Migrants, and Refugees (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009)
• Kasaba, Resat (ed.). Cambridge History of Turkey, Vol. IV: Turkey in the Modern World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008)
• Kasaba, Resat and Sibel Bozdoğan (eds.) Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1997)
• Kasaba, Resat, Ellis Goldberg and Joel Migdal, eds. Rules and Rights in the Middle East: Democracy, Law, and Society (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1993)
• Kasaba, Resat. Cities in the World-System (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1991)
• Kasaba, Resat. The Ottoman Empire and the World-Economy: The Nineteenth Century (Albany: SUNY Press, 1988)
 

Sabine Lang is Associate Professor of International and European Studies at JSIS and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Departments of Political Science and Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies. She works in comparative politics with a focus on civil society, the public sphere, the nongovernmental sector, and gender politics. Her current research focuses on transnational advocacy and multilevel governance in the European Union and her research interest is in the SMS field.

• Lang, Sabine. NGOs, Civil Society, and the Public Sphere. (New York: Cambridge University Press 2012)
 

William Lavely is Director of the East Asia Center and Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and the Department of Sociology. His research and teaching interests are in the SMS field and focus on social demography and Chinese society.

 

José Antonio Lucero is Associate Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and the Chair of the Latin American and Caribbean Studies program. Working across the fields of comparative political science and anthropology, Lucero is interested in the intersections of politics and culture, and the methods of historical institutionalism, cultural studies, and ethnography. His current research explore the cultural politics of extractive industries, Indigenous movements, and borders in the Andes and Meso-America. His research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields.

• Lucero, José Antonio. Struggles of Voice: The Politics of Indigenous Representation in the Andes (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press. 2008)       • Donna Lee Van Cott,  José Antonio Lucero, and Dale Turner, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous People's Politics (Oxford University Press, forthcoming) 
 

Hwasook Nam is the James B. Palais Endowed Associate Professor in Korea Studies at the Jackson School of International Studies and the Department of History. Her research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields and include labor, gender, and intellectual history of modern Korea.

• Nam, Hwasook. Building Ships, Building a Nation: Korea's Democratic Unionism under Park Chung Hee (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009)

 

Devin Naar is the Marsha & Jay Glazer Assistant Professor in Jewish Studies whose research focuses on Modern Jewish History, Sephardic Jewry, Ottoman Empire and Greece, Transnational Studies, and Urban History. His research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields.

 

Christian Lee Novetzke is Associate Professor in the South Asia Program, the Comparative Religion Program, and the International Studies Program at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies. Professor Novetzke teaches and writes about religion, history, and culture in South Asia, as well as theoretical issues in the study of religion in general and its intersection with historiography. He works in Marathi and Hindi materials, including textual, ethnographic, and visual/filmic sources and specializes in the study of Maharashtra over the second millennium CE to the present. His research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields.

• Novetzke, Christian lee. Religion and Public Memory: A Cultural History of Saint Namdev in India (New York: Columbia University Press, 2008)

 

Robert Pekkanen is Associate Professor in the Jackson School of International Studies and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science. His major substantive areas of teaching and research are civil society, advocacy by nonprofits, grassroots local organizations, social movements, political parties, electoral systems, candidate recruitment and political representation. He maintains a keen methodological interest in comparative historical sociology, historical institutionalism, and interview methods. His research interests are in the SMS field with primary geographic focus is on Japan, but he has also published research on New Zealand and co-edited a book on US nonprofits and is co-Principal Investigator in a NSF-funded 11 country comparative research project on electoral systems.

• Pekkanen, Robert, Steven Reed and Ethan Scheiner. Japan Decides 2012: The Japanese General Election (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013)
• Pekkanen, Robert and Ellis S. Krauss. The Rise and Fall of Japan's LDP : Political Party Organizations as Historical Institutions (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2011)
• Pekkanen, Robert. Japan's Dual Civil Society: Members Without Advocates (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006)
 

Saadia Pekkanen is the founding Director of the Jackson School Ph.D. Program and the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor at the Jackson School of International Studies. She is Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science, and Adjunct Professor at the School of Law where she also teaches courses. Her areas of research interest are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields, and include international political economy, international law, space security and policy, and the international relations of Japan/Asia.

• Pekkanen, Saadia, John Ravenhill, and Rosemary Foot, eds. The Oxford Handbook of the International Relations of Asia (forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2014)
• Pekkanen, Saadia and Paul Kallender. In Defense of Japan: From the Market to the Military in Space Policy (Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2010)
• Pekkanen, Saadia. Japan's Aggressive Legalism: Law and Foreign Trade Politics Beyond the WTO (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2008)
• Pekkanen, Saadia and Kellee S. Tsai, eds. Japan and China in the World Political Economy (London; New York: Routledge, 2005)
• Pekkanen, Saadia. Picking Winners? From Technology Catch-up to the Space Race in Japan (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2003)
 

 

Kazimierz Poznanski is Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. His research and teaching interests are in the SMS field and include International political economy, Comparative economic systems, Economics of technological change, and Soviet and East European economies.

• Poznanski, Kazimierz. Negative Globalization: Capital Expropriation in Eastern Europe (Beijing: China’s Academy of Social Sciences, 2004)
• Poznanski, Kazimierz. The Confused Reforms: Poland’s Asset Sellout (Warsaw: Publishing Cooperative, 2001)
• Poznanski, Kazimierz. The Failure of Poland’s Transition (Warsaw: Publishing and Literary Association, 2000)
• Poznanski, Kazimierz. Poland's Protracted Transition: Institutional Change and Economic Growth in 1970-1994, (The Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Series No. 98) (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996)
• Poznanski, Kazimierz (ed.). The Evolutionary Transition to Capitalism: In Search of a Paradigm (Boulder: Westview Press, 1994)
• Poznanski, Kazimierz (ed.). Stabilization and Privatization in Poland: An Economic Evaluation of the Shock Therapy Program (Boston: Kluwer Academic Press, 1993)
• Poznanski, Kazimierz (ed.). Constructing Capitalism: The Reemergence of Civil Society and Liberal Economy in the Post-Communist World (Boulder: Westview Press, 1992)
• Poznanski, Kazimierz. Technology, Competition and the Soviet Bloc in the World Market (Berkeley: University of California- Berkeley, Institute of International Studies, 1987)
• Poznanski, Kazimierz. Technical Innovations in the Market Economy (Warsaw: State Scientific Press, 1979)
 

Scott Radnitz is Associate Professor of International Studies and Director of the Ellison Center for Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington. His research interests are in the SMS and PVS fields and deal with authoritarian politics, informal networks, and identity, with an emphasis on Central Asia and the Caucasus. His book, Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-led Protests in Central Asia, was published by Cornell University Press in 2010.

• Radnitz, Scott. Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-Led Protests in Central Asia (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010)

 

Cabeiri Robinson is Associate Professor in the International Studies, Comparative Religions, and South Asian Studies programs. She is an adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropology and affiliated faculty with the Interdisciplinary Near and Middle East Program. Her research focuses on Political Islam, Political and Legal Anthropology, Historical Anthropology, Political Violence and Armed Conflict, Human Rights and Humanitarianism, Refugees Studies, and Comparative Muslim Societies. Her research interests are in the RCC, SMS and PVS fields.

• Robinson, Cabeiri. Body of the Victim, Body of the Warrior: Refugee Families and the Kashmir Jihad (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013)

 

Matt Sparke is Professor of Geography and International Studies, and Adjunct Professor of Global Health. His interests are in the SMS, PVS and LRG fields. His current research explores the ways in which the verticalization of global health initiatives has come together with the global spread of market-based governance to produce a series of geographical targeting and enclaving effects in global health practices.

• Sparke, Matt. Introducing Globalization: Ties, Tensions and Uneven Integration (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013)
• Sparke, Matt. In the Space of Theory: Postfoundational Geographies of the Nation-State (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2005)
 

Clark Sorenson is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Jackson School of International Studies and Director of the Center for Korea Studies. He has adjunct appointments in Anthropology and Women’s Studies, and is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Korean Studies. His research interests are in the SMS field.

• Sorenson, Clark, Yong-Chool Ha and Hong Yung Lee (eds.). Colonial Rule and Social Change in Korea, 1910-1945 (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2013)
• Sorenson, Clark and Hyung-A Kim (eds.). Reassessing the Park Chung Hee Era, 1961-1979: Development, Political Thought, Democracy, and Cultural Influence (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2011)
• Sorenson, Clark. Over the Mountains are Mountains: Korean Peasant Households and their Adaptations to Rapid Industrialization (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1988)
 

Nathalie Williams is Assistant Professor in South and Southeast Asian Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and in the Department of Sociology. Her research and teaching interests are in the SMS and PVS fields, and include demography, migration, armed conflict, climate change, and South and Southeast Asia.

 

Anand Yang is the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor, International Studies; Director of the South Asia Center of the Jackson School of International Studies; and a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS and LRG fields, including two current book projects: coerced Indian labor in Southeast Asia, and Chinese and South Asian labor migrations across the globe in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

• Yang, Anand, Jerry Bentley and Renate Bridenthal. Interactions: Transregional Perspectives on World History (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2005)
• Yang, Anand. Bazaar India: Peasants, Traders, Markets and the Colonial State in Gangetic Bihar, 1765-1947 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998)
• Yang, Anand. The Limited Raj: Agrarian Relations in Colonial India, Saran District, 1793-1920 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989)
• Yang, Anand (ed.). Crime and Criminality in British India (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1986)
 

Glennys Young is a Professor at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies in the Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian Studies program. She holds a joint appointment as Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington. Her research interests are in the RCC and SMS fields. Her past research has included work on religious activism in revolutionary Russia, the communist experience of the 20th century, and societal atheism in Soviet Russia.

• Young, Glennys. The Communist Experience in the Twentieth Century: A Global History through Sources (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011)
• Young, Glennys and Reginald E. Zelnik (eds.). Perils of Pankratova: Some Stories from the Annals of Soviet Historiography (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2005)
• Young, Glennys. Power and the Sacred in Revolutionary Russia: Religious Activists in the Village (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997)
 

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Peace, Violence, and Security (PVS)


This field exposes students to theoretical and foreign policy debates about global security challenges, conflicts, and violence, as well as issues of their prevention. The main faculty members in this field include the following: 

David Bachman is Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. He was chair of the China Studies Program from 1992-2003 and Associate Director of the Jackson School from 2000-2001 and 2003-2010. His research and teaching interests are Chinese Domestic and Foreign Policy, International Political Economy, Asian Politics, , International Relations, and U.S. - China Relations. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS, PVS, and LRG fields.

• Bachman, David and Yang Dali (eds. and trans.). Yan Jiaqi and China's Struggle for Democracy (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1991)
• Bachman, David. Bureaucracy, Economy, and Leadership: The Institutional Origins of the Great Leap Forward (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991)
• Bachman, David. Chen Yun and the Chinese Political System (Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, 1985)
 

Mary Callahan is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Her research and teaching interests are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields for the Jackson School PhD program, with a particular emphasis on Political Reform in Post-Junta Constitutional Myanmar. Her research has also included Asian militaries in political reform processes, the history of peace negotiations in modern Myanmar, and civil-military relations in South East Asia.

• Callahan, Mary. Political Authority in Burma’s Ethnic Minority States: Devolution, Occupation and Coexistence (Washington, D.C.: East-West Center, 2007)
• Callahan, Mary. Making Enemies: War and State Building in Burma (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003)
 

Daniel Chirot is the Herbert J. Ellison Professor of Russian and Eurasian Studies and Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington. His teaching, research, and writing concentrate on ethnic conflict and conflict resolution, democracy and tyranny, and social change. His research interests are in the PVS field, and he has worked mostly in Eastern European and somewhat in West Africa and Southeast Asia.

• Chirot, Daniel. How Societies Change. [Completely new and revised 2nd edition.] (Thousand Oaks: Sage, 2011)
• Chirot, Daniel. Contentious Identities: Ethnic, Religious and Nationalist Conflicts in Today’s World (New York: Routledge, 2011)
• Chirot, Daniel and Clark McCauley. Why Not Kill Them All? The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006. 2nd edition, 2010)
• Chirot, Daniel and Martin Seligman (eds.). Ethnopolitical Warfare: Causes, Consequences, and Possible Solutions (Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association Press, 2001)
• Chirot, Daniel and Anthony Reid (eds.). Essential Outsiders: Chinese and Jews in the Modern Transformation of Southeast Asia and Central Europe (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1997)
• Chirot, Daniel. Modern Tyrants: The Power and Prevalence of Evil in Our Age (New York: The Free Press, 1994 – 2nd edition, Princeton University Press, 1996)
• Chirot, Daniel (ed.) The Crisis of Leninism and the Decline of the Left: The Revolutions of 1989 (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1991)
• Chirot, Daniel (ed.), The Origins of Backwardness in Eastern Europe: Economic and Political Change from the Middle Ages until the Early Twentieth Century (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989 – 2nd, 1991).
• Chirot, Daniel. Social Change in the Modern Era (San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1986)
• Chirot, Daniel and Holley Coulter (trans.), Henri H. Stahl (author). Traditional Romanian Village Communities: The Transition from the Communal to the Capitalist Mode of Production in the Danube Region (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980. 2nd edition, 2008)
• Chirot, Daniel. Social Change in the Twentieth Century (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1977)
• Chirot, Daniel. Social Change in a Peripheral Society: The Creation of a Balkan Colony (New York: Academic Press, 1976)
 

Kathie Friedman is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. She is also an adjunct Associate Professor in the departments of Sociology and Women Studies, and is affiliated with the Interdisciplinary PhD program in Near and Middle East Studies, the Jewish Studies Program, and the African Studies Program. Her course topics Comparative Immigration Studies, Forced Migrations, Global Diasporas, and Jewish American Women and Social Change. Her research interests are in the RCC, PVS and LRG fields.

• Friedman, Kathie. Memories of Migration: Gender, Ethnicity, and Work in the Lives of Jewish and Italian Women, New York 1870-1924 (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996)
• Friedman, Kathie, Joan Smith, Immanuel Wallerstein et al. Creating and Transforming Households: The Constraints of the World-Economy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992)
 

Angelina Godoy is Helen H. Jackson Endowed Chair in Human Rights and Director at the Center for Human Rights at the University of Washington. She is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School, Associate Professor of Law, Societies, and Justice, and Adjunct Associate Professor of Sociology. A sociologist by training, her research focuses on human rights in Central and Latin America. Godoy teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in human rights in both the Law, Societies, and Justice program and in the Jackson School of International Studies. Her research interests are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields.

• Godoy, Angelina. Of Medicines and Markets: Intellectual Property and Human Rights in the Free Trade Era (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013)
• Godoy, Angelina. Popular Injustice: Violence, Community, and Law in Latin America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006)
 

Yong-Chool Ha is Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Social Science. His primary academic interests have been comparative politics and society with a particular focus on late coming nations (Korea, Japan, Prussia, China and the Soviet Union), Soviet and Russian politics, Russian Far East Korean domestic and international politics, inter-Korean Relations and East Asian regional politics and international theories in East Asia. His research interests are in the SMS and PVS fields.

• Ha, Yong-Chool , Hong Yung Lee and Clark Sorenson (eds.). Colonial Rule and Social Change in Korea, 1910-1945 (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2013)
• Ha, Yong-Chool. Russia’s Choice at the Crossroads (Seoul: Seoul National University Press, 2006)
• Ha, Yong-Chool (ed.) Journey to Siberia (Seoul: Dong-A-Ilbo-Sa, 2001).
• Ha, Yong-Chool, Stanislaw Gomulka and Cae-One Kim (eds.). Economic Reforms in the Socialist World (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1989)
 

Don Hellmann is a Professor in the Jackson School of International Studies and the Department of Political Science, and Director of the Institute for International Policy (IIP). He has taken the lead in the creation of a region-wide consortium of universities and research centers devoted to cooperative research and practical initiatives regarding regional policy, technology, and development issues in the Pacific Rim. His research interests are in the PVS field, and he teaches courses on Japanese government and politics, American foreign policy as well as the international relations of Northeast Asia.

• Hellman, Donald and Kenneth Pyle (eds.). From APEC to Xanadu: Creating a Viable Community in the Post-War Pacific (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1997)
• Hellman, Donald. United States and Japan After the Cold War (Washington D.C.: American Enterprise Institute, 1992)
• Hellman, Donald and John H. Makin (eds.). Sharing World Leadership?: A New Era for America & Japan (Washington, D.C.: American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, 1989)
• Hellman, Donald (ed.). China & Japan: A New Balance of Power. (Lexington: Lexington Books, 1976)
• Hellman, Donald (ed.). Southern Asia: The Politics of Poverty & Peace (Lexington: Lexington Books, 1976)
• Hellman, Donald. Japan and East Asia; The New International Order (New York: Praeger, 1972)
• Hellman, Donald. Japanese Foreign Policy and Domestic Politics; The Peace Agreement with the Soviet Union (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1969)
 

Chris Jones is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. His research interests are in the PVS field, and his teaching focuses on NATO/Warsaw pact relations, post-Cold War security issues, and political economy of the post-Cold War era.

 

Reşat Kasaba (ex officio) is Director of the Jackson School. He is the Stanley D. Golub Professor of International Studies. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS, and PVS fields, with an area focus on the Middle East and Turkey.

• Kasaba, Resat. A Moveable Empire: Ottoman nomads, Migrants, and Refugees(Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2009)
• Kasaba, Resat (ed.). Cambridge History of Turkey, Vol. IV: Turkey in the Modern World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008)
• Kasaba, Resat and Sibel Bozdoğan (eds.) Rethinking Modernity and National Identity in Turkey (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1997)
• Kasaba, Resat, Ellis Goldberg and Joel Migdal, eds. Rules and Rights in the Middle East: Democracy, Law, and Society (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1993)
• Kasaba, Resat. Cities in the World-System (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1991)
• Kasaba, Resat. The Ottoman Empire and the World-Economy: The Nineteenth Century (Albany: SUNY Press, 1988)
 

Saadia Pekkanen is the founding Director of the Jackson School Ph.D. Program and the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor at the Jackson School of International Studies. She is Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science, and Adjunct Professor at the School of Law where she also teaches courses. Her areas of research interest are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields, and include international political economy, international law, space security and policy, and the international relations of Japan/Asia.

• Pekkanen, Saadia, John Ravenhill, and Rosemary Foot, eds. The Oxford Handbook of the International Relations of Asia (forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2014)
• Pekkanen, Saadia and Paul Kallender. In Defense of Japan: From the Market to the Military in Space Policy (Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2010)
• Pekkanen, Saadia. Japan's Aggressive Legalism: Law and Foreign Trade Politics Beyond the WTO (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2008)
• Pekkanen, Saadia and Kellee S. Tsai, eds. Japan and China in the World Political Economy (London; New York: Routledge, 2005)
• Pekkanen, Saadia. Picking Winners? From Technology Catch-up to the Space Race in Japan (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2003)

 

Ken Pyle is the Henry M. Jackson Professor of History and Asian Studies and founding president of the National Bureau of Asian Research. Pyle is the author and editor of numerous books on modern Japan and its history and currently teaches courses on modern Japanese and international history. His research interests are in the RCC and PVS fields.

• Pyle, Kenneth. Japan Rising: The Resurgence of Japanese Power and Purpose (New York: PublicAffairs Books, 2007)
• Pyle, Kenneth and Hellman, Donald (eds.). From APEC to Xanadu: Creating a Viable Community in the Post-War Pacific (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1997)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The Japanese Question: Power and Purpose in a New Era (Washington, D.C.: AEI Press, Second edition, 1996)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The Making of Modern Japan, new (substantially enlarged) edition (Wilmington: Houghton Mifflin, 1996)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The Japanese Question: Power and Purpose in a New Era (Washington, D.C.: AEI Press, 1992)
• Pyle, Kenneth (ed.). The Trade Crisis: How Will Japan Respond? (Seattle: Society for Japanese Studies, 1987)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The Making of Modern Japan (Lexington: Heath, 1978)
• Pyle, Kenneth. The New Generation in Meiji Japan: Problems of Cultural Identity, 1885-1895 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1969)
 

Scott Radnitz is Associate Professor of International Studies and Director of the Ellison Center for Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies at the University of Washington. His research interests are in the SMS and PVS fields and deal with authoritarian politics, informal networks, and identity, with an emphasis on Central Asia and the Caucasus. His book, Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-led Protests in Central Asia, was published by Cornell University Press in 2010.

• Radnitz, Scott. Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-Led Protests in Central Asia (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2010)

 

Cabeiri Robinson is Associate Professor in the International Studies, Comparative Religions, and South Asian Studies programs. She is an adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropology and affiliated faculty with the Interdisciplinary Near and Middle East Program. Her research focuses on Political Islam, Political and Legal Anthropology, Historical Anthropology, Political Violence and Armed Conflict, Human Rights and Humanitarianism, Refugees Studies, and Comparative Muslim Societies. Her research interests are in the RCC, SMS and PVS fields.

• Robinson, Cabeiri. Body of the Victim, Body of the Warrior: Refugee Families and the Kashmir Jihad (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013)

 

Matt Sparke is Professor of Geography and International Studies, and Adjunct Professor of Global Health. His interests are in the SMS, PVS and LRG fields. His current research explores the ways in which the verticalization of global health initiatives has come together with the global spread of market-based governance to produce a series of geographical targeting and enclaving effects in global health practices.

• Sparke, Matt. Introducing Globalization: Ties, Tensions and Uneven Integration (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013)
• Sparke, Matt. In the Space of Theory: Postfoundational Geographies of the Nation-State (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2005)
 

Jim Wellman is Professor and Chair of the Comparative Religion Program in the Jackson School of International Studies. Teaching at the University of Washington since 2002, his areas of expertise are in American religious culture, history, politics and its relationship to foreign policy and international studies. His research interests are in the RCC and PVS fields.

• Wellman, James K. Jr. Rob Bell and a New American Christianity (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2012)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. and Clark Lombardi (eds.). Religion and Human Security: Global Perspective (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. Evangelicals vs. Liberals: The Clash of Christian Cultures in the Pacific Northwest (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. Belief and Bloodshed: Religion and Violence across Time and Tradition (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2007)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. Gold Coast Church and the Ghetto: Christ and Culture in Mainline Protestantism (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 1999)
• Wellman, James K. Jr. and William H. Swatos, Jr. The Power of Religious Publics: Staking Claims in American Society (Westport: Praeger Publishers, 1999)
 

Nathalie Williams is Assistant Professor in South and Southeast Asian Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and in the Department of Sociology. Her research and teaching interests are in the SMS and PVS fields, and include demography, migration, armed conflict, climate change, and South and Southeast Asia.

 

Anand Yang is the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor, International Studies; Director of the South Asia Center of the Jackson School of International Studies; and a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS and LRG fields, including two current book projects: coerced Indian labor in Southeast Asia, and Chinese and South Asian labor migrations across the globe in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

• Yang, Anand, Jerry Bentley and Renate Bridenthal. Interactions: Transregional Perspectives on World History (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2005)
• Yang, Anand. Bazaar India: Peasants, Traders, Markets and the Colonial State in Gangetic Bihar, 1765-1947 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998)
• Yang, Anand. The Limited Raj: Agrarian Relations in Colonial India, Saran District, 1793-1920 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989)
• Yang, Anand (ed.). Crime and Criminality in British India (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1986)
 

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Law, Rights, and Governance (LRG)


This field exposes students to theoretical and policy debates about the causes and consequences of legal evolution, rule of law, and a broad range of governance concerns in world affairs. The main faculty members in this field include the following: 

David Bachman is Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. He was chair of the China Studies Program from 1992-2003 and Associate Director of the Jackson School from 2000-2001 and 2003-2010. His research and teaching interests are Chinese Domestic and Foreign Policy, International Political Economy, Asian Politics, , International Relations, and U.S. - China Relations. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS, PVS, and LRG fields.

• Bachman, David and Yang Dali (eds. and trans.). Yan Jiaqi and China's Struggle for Democracy (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1991)
• Bachman, David. Bureaucracy, Economy, and Leadership: The Institutional Origins of the Great Leap Forward (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991)
• Bachman, David. Chen Yun and the Chinese Political System (Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies, 1985)
 

Gad Barzilai is Professor of Law, Political Science and International Studies, in the Law, Societies, and Justice Program [LSJ], Comparative, Law and Society Studies Center [CLASS], and in the Jackson School of International Studies at University of Washington. His research and teaching interests are in the LRG field and focus on comparative law, comparative politics, law and politics, politics and legal rights, law and social theories, methodologies for research of law and society, and law in Israel and the Middle East. Barzilai has published heretofore seventeen books and more than one hundred articles.


• Barzilai, Gad. Communities and Law: Politics and Cultures of Legal Identities (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003)
• Barzilai, Gad. Wars, Internal Conflicts, and Political Order (New York: State University of New York Press, 1996)
 

Mary Callahan is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Her research and teaching interests are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields for the Jackson School PhD program, with a particular emphasis on Political Reform in Post-Junta Constitutional Myanmar. Her research has also included Asian militaries in political reform processes, the history of peace negotiations in modern Myanmar, and civil-military relations in South East Asia.

• Callahan, Mary. Political Authority in Burma’s Ethnic Minority States: Devolution, Occupation and Coexistence (Washington, D.C.: East-West Center, 2007)
• Callahan, Mary. Making Enemies: War and State Building in Burma (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003)
 

Patrick Christie is a Professor in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and in the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs. His research and teaching interests are in the LRG field and include social feasibility of ecosystem-based management and marine protected areas, integrated coastal management, marine protected area impacts on coral reef fisheries and fishing communities, participatory research, and qualitative social research methods.

• Christie, Patrick et al. (eds.) Taking Care of What We Have: Participatory Natural Resource Management on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua (Ottawa: International Development Research Centre, 2000)

 

Sara Curran is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. She holds a joint appointment as the Associate Professor at the Evans School of Public Affairs, is Associate Director at the Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, and holds adjunct Associate Professor positions in the Department of Global Health and the Department of Sociology. Curran researches migration, globalization, gender, climate change and adaptation, and development. Curran employs a variety of research techniques, including qualitative field work, survey field work, regression modeling, mixed methods, and spatial and network analyses. Her research interests are in the RCC, SMS, and LRG fields.

• Curran, Sara, April Linton, Abigail Cooke and Andrew Schrank (eds.) The Global Governance of Food (London: Routledge, 2009)
 

Kathie Friedman is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. She is also an adjunct Associate Professor in the departments of Sociology and Women Studies, and is affiliated with the Interdisciplinary PhD program in Near and Middle East Studies, the Jewish Studies Program, and the African Studies Program. Her course topics Comparative Immigration Studies, Forced Migrations, Global Diasporas, and Jewish American Women and Social Change. Her research interests are in the RCC, PVS and LRG fields.

• Friedman, Kathie. Memories of Migration: Gender, Ethnicity, and Work in the Lives of Jewish and Italian Women, New York 1870-1924 (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996)
• Friedman, Kathie, Joan Smith, Immanuel Wallerstein et al. Creating and Transforming Households: The Constraints of the World-Economy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992)
 

Angelina Godoy is Helen H. Jackson Endowed Chair in Human Rights and Director at the Center for Human Rights at the University of Washington. She is Associate Professor of International Studies at the Henry M. Jackson School, Associate Professor of Law, Societies, and Justice, and Adjunct Associate Professor of Sociology. A sociologist by training, her research focuses on human rights in Central and Latin America. Godoy teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in human rights in both the Law, Societies, and Justice program and in the Jackson School of International Studies. Her research interests are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields.

• Godoy, Angelina. Of Medicines and Markets: Intellectual Property and Human Rights in the Free Trade Era (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013)
• Godoy, Angelina. Popular Injustice: Violence, Community, and Law in Latin America (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006)
 

Saadia Pekkanen is the founding Director of the Jackson School Ph.D. Program and the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor at the Jackson School of International Studies. She is Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science, and Adjunct Professor at the School of Law where she also teaches courses. Her areas of research interest are in the SMS, PVS, and LRG fields, and include international political economy, international law, space security and policy, and the international relations of Japan/Asia.

• Pekkanen, Saadia, John Ravenhill, and Rosemary Foot, eds. The Oxford Handbook of the International Relations of Asia (forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2014)
• Pekkanen, Saadia and Paul Kallender. In Defense of Japan: From the Market to the Military in Space Policy (Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2010)
• Pekkanen, Saadia. Japan's Aggressive Legalism: Law and Foreign Trade Politics Beyond the WTO (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2008)
• Pekkanen, Saadia and Kellee S. Tsai, eds. Japan and China in the World Political Economy (London; New York: Routledge, 2005)
• Pekkanen, Saadia. Picking Winners? From Technology Catch-up to the Space Race in Japan (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2003)
    
 

Matt Sparke is Professor of Geography and International Studies, and Adjunct Professor of Global Health. His interests are in the SMS, PVS and LRG fields. His current research explores the ways in which the verticalization of global health initiatives has come together with the global spread of market-based governance to produce a series of geographical targeting and enclaving effects in global health practices.

• Sparke, Matt. Introducing Globalization: Ties, Tensions and Uneven Integration (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013)
• Sparke, Matt. In the Space of Theory: Postfoundational Geographies of the Nation-State (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2005)
 

Anand Yang is the Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor, International Studies; Director of the South Asia Center of the Jackson School of International Studies; and a Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington. His research interests are in the RCC, SMS and LRG fields, including two current book projects: coerced Indian labor in Southeast Asia, and Chinese and South Asian labor migrations across the globe in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

• Yang, Anand, Jerry Bentley and Renate Bridenthal. Interactions: Transregional Perspectives on World History (Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2005)
• Yang, Anand. Bazaar India: Peasants, Traders, Markets and the Colonial State in Gangetic Bihar, 1765-1947 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998)
• Yang, Anand. The Limited Raj: Agrarian Relations in Colonial India, Saran District, 1793-1920 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989)
• Yang, Anand (ed.). Crime and Criminality in British India (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1986)

 

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JSIS Ph.D. Program
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
jsisphd@uw.edu

Director, Ph.D. Program
Saadia M. Pekkanen
(206) 543-6148
smp1@uw.edu

Ph.D. Program Administrator
John Charlton
jcharltn@uw.edu

Ph.D. Program Committee
Resat Kasaba (ex officio)
Sabine Lang
Wolfram Latsch (ex officio)
Christian Lee Novetzke
Saadia Pekkanen
Scott Radnitz
James Wellman